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To: Mrs. Don-o
Anyone who know anything about bacterial evolution (adaptation, if you must) knows that restricting treatment to a single antibiotic is a guaranteed recipe for selecting strains that are immune to that antibiotic.

Any individual bacterium that develops immunity to a single antibiotic will rapidly propagate.

It is hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of times less likely for a bacterium to simultaneously have genetic mutations that provide immunity to two different antibiotics.

6 posted on 08/14/2012 12:39:10 PM PDT by null and void (Day 1303 of our ObamaVacation from reality - Heroes aren't made Frank, they're cornered...)
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To: null and void
You might try internet archive
16 posted on 08/14/2012 1:18:39 PM PDT by 1raider1
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To: null and void

I blame the FDA. It shouldn’t take 20 years to get a new antibiotic approved, especially if it is a slight variation on an existing molecule. We can and should “evolve” new antibiotic defenses at least as rapidly as our microbial adversaries evolve defenses against what we are already throwing at them.


35 posted on 08/14/2012 3:20:20 PM PDT by Stirner
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