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Memo to greens: Maybe grocery bags should be disposable for a reason
Townhall.com ^ | August 17, 2012 | ERIKA JOHNSON

Posted on 08/18/2012 7:17:49 AM PDT by Kaslin

From the Property and Environment Research Center, here’s a thought-provoking little vid about why we should all think a little more deeply about the unintended consequences of even our best intentions before we push for government fiat to make them a reality. The environmental movement in particular tends to be a big fan of forcing society to comply with what they deem to be virtuous behavior via government crackdown. The EPA is constantly justifying it’s many regulations by claiming that they’re only safeguarding the public’s health and welfare — for instance, that the costs of their clean-air regulations are trumped by the fact that they could be saving the lives of asthma-prone infants. But if saving lives is our ultimate goal, it looks like the eco-trendy set, in pushing for more plastic grocery-bag bans, may inadvertently be perpetuating a policy that could be causing a rise in food-borne illnesses. Maybe it’s actually a good idea to dispose of the materials with which we transport our raw foods — just something to think about.

Foodborne Illness & Plastic Bag Bans


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: duplicate; goodolddays; greens; grocery; plastic; plasticbags; publichealth

1 posted on 08/18/2012 7:17:49 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

I use my plastic grocery bags in my kitchen trashcan after I remove the groceries. If I don’t have those to use, I will have to spend money to buy plastic bags for my trash, which will also end up in landfills. So where is the benefit?


2 posted on 08/18/2012 7:25:23 AM PDT by GnL
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To: Kaslin

My Mother worked in a local dairy as a kid washing glass milk bottles. She had horror stories of milk bottles being returned with dead mice, having obviously been used as urinals and even used to store kerosene and thus would never buy milk in glass bottles only in single use sealed cartons. When I see people at the grocery store now buying organic milk at double the price of regular milk and paying a $2 deposit on the returnable glass bottle, I think of my Mother’s stories.


3 posted on 08/18/2012 7:26:31 AM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: Kaslin; momtothree

It makes sense to not reuse bags that have had raw meat packages in them. Reusing bags that held fresh fruit and vegetables would be less of a problem, and of course sealed containers like cans would not contaminate anything. If they can be recycled for remanufacturing in a sanitary process, then let the recyclers knock themselves out. People worry about their getting loose in the outdoors. Maybe they could be harvested for bulking material in building and manufacturing. Pollution is simply a resource out of place.


4 posted on 08/18/2012 7:33:34 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (let me ABOs run loose, lew (or is that lou?))
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To: The Great RJ

Why when my cats catch a mouse I always put them in milk bottles....

Anyhow, these vessels are machine washed today. So long as anything like a mouse was removed before cleaning I wouldn’t see reason to worry. If people want the bottles let them have them.


5 posted on 08/18/2012 7:37:19 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (let me ABOs run loose, lew (or is that lou?))
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To: Kaslin
Maybe it’s actually a good idea to dispose of the materials with which we transport our raw foods — just something to think about.

They don't think. They fantasize.
6 posted on 08/18/2012 7:39:01 AM PDT by aruanan
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To: Kaslin

id offer an opinion that if you took the environmental costs of producing, vending, washing, etc. the cloth bags the green want us to use, is far greater than that spent producing plastic grocery bags.....just sayin


7 posted on 08/18/2012 7:42:53 AM PDT by camle (keep an open mind and someone will fill it full of something for you)
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To: Kaslin

I make them double bag my groceries with plastic.


8 posted on 08/18/2012 7:46:34 AM PDT by Boardwalk
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To: The Great RJ

When I was kid, we had to pay extra for a dead mouse in our milk bottle. Dead mouse milk mixed with Bosco was a family favorite.


9 posted on 08/18/2012 7:56:06 AM PDT by Krankor
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Why when my cats catch a mouse I always put them in milk bottles....

How do you get the cat through that little hole?


10 posted on 08/18/2012 7:57:06 AM PDT by Iron Munro ("Jiggle the Handle for Barry!")
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To: Kaslin

Once again libtards get their way and screw up society even more... one generation’s mindless ignorant libtards demand the marketplace provide plastic bags “to save the ‘twees’”, which is then followed by the next generation of libtards who demand they harm the environment.

One generation’s mindless ignorant libtards demand government force the marketplace to provide toilets that hold only 2.4 gallons of water rather than 3.2 gallons in order to “save our water”, which results in most housholds having to flush twice to remove the waste from an average 12-year old “sitting”. Result: 4.8 gallons > 3.2 gallons... once again, brilliant libtard demands result in more societal harm than good.

One generation’s mindless ignorant libtards demand that society begin drinking more water which in turn results in... (gasp) more plastic bottles in the land fill. Next generation’s “resolution”: Tax people drinking the bottled water.

Exactly HOW MUCH LONGER are the American people going to continue walking down this mindless ignorant libtard path of destruction?! Just amazing...


11 posted on 08/18/2012 8:04:38 AM PDT by Common Sense 101 (Hey libs... If your theories fly in the face of reality, it's not reality that's wrong.)
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To: Kaslin

Dead mouse in the milk bottle. Sorta like the dead worm in the tequila bottle. Except I reckon the worm had more fun :)


12 posted on 08/18/2012 8:15:00 AM PDT by upchuck ("Definition of 'racist:' someone that is winning an argument with a liberal." ~ Peter Brimelow)
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To: GnL
Cabinet Door Trash Bag Holders


13 posted on 08/18/2012 8:15:46 AM PDT by Iron Munro ("Jiggle the Handle for Barry!")
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To: Kaslin

It is easy to manufacture plastic bags made from various corn/vegetable based oils which decompose in landfills after a few years.

In fact, in my area Western NY, most of the grocery bags are of this type.

As one who spent 26+ years in the printing business I can tell you the recycled paper process is very toxic to the environment but that never stopped the greens because their real goal, along with most liberals, is to depopulate the planet of humans.


14 posted on 08/18/2012 8:15:46 AM PDT by Wurlitzer (Nothing says "ignorance" like Islam!)
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To: Kaslin

Recieved this e-mail last week. Its a long read but rather entertaining

Being Green

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.
The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”
The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”
She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.
Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.
But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.
Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.
But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.
We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.
But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.
Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.
But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.
Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana . In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.
But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.
We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.
But we didn’t have the green thing back then.
Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.
But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?


15 posted on 08/18/2012 8:36:22 AM PDT by Gettin Betta
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To: Kaslin

When I was younger we used paper bags. They decompose, can be recycled and are much more practical for groceries since they stand up by themselves and hold a lot more.


16 posted on 08/18/2012 8:44:28 AM PDT by Former Proud Canadian (Obamanomics-We don't need your stinking tar sands oil, we'll just grow algae.)
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To: Gettin Betta

OMG...using paper bags as book covers, takes me back!!! They were also much stronger than the book covers you could buy.

Now that memory brings me to another....my sticker book, and trading stickers w/ my friends!

I will take a moment to relish in my memories. Thanks =).


17 posted on 08/18/2012 10:00:25 AM PDT by NoGrayZone (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: GnL

The plastic bags around here always tear or have holes in the bottoms so you can’t reuse them anymore. I can go through about two dozen before I find one that doesn’t have holes so I can use it for the litter box.


18 posted on 08/18/2012 10:17:04 AM PDT by bgill
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To: NoGrayZone

And we could draw on or decorate them any way we wanted to.

Today, the schools don’t require book covers so the books end up destroyed at the end of the year. More tax dollars down the drain.


19 posted on 08/18/2012 10:19:01 AM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill
"And we could draw on or decorate them any way we wanted to."

And boy, did we! Also decorated them w/ my stickers, especially the scratch and sniff ones. Some of those were just plain fun.

J.B.-n-J.V......2gether 4 eva, lol.

20 posted on 08/18/2012 10:24:25 AM PDT by NoGrayZone (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: Kaslin

Save The World

Do Not Use Plastic Bags To Carry These Grocery Items Home


21 posted on 08/18/2012 12:53:10 PM PDT by Iron Munro ("Jiggle the Handle for Barry!")
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To: Kaslin

Plus, you have to put your garbage in some plastic bag before it goes to your garbage can. Most people re-use their plastic shopping bags for that. If you don’t get plastic shopping bags, you just have to spend money on garbage bags, which cost you extra money.


22 posted on 08/18/2012 1:04:19 PM PDT by Uncle Miltie (You didn't build that. The private sector is doing fine. We tried our plan and it worked.)
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To: Kaslin; All

Every complex problem has a simple solution ... that is wrong. Simple solutions are attractive because any fool can see what they are supposed to do. It is much more difficult to see the unintended consequences of their implementation.


23 posted on 08/18/2012 1:09:12 PM PDT by marktwain
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To: camle
id offer an opinion that if you took the environmental costs of producing, vending, washing, etc. the cloth bags the green want us to use, is far greater than that spent producing plastic grocery bags.....just sayin

Cost is a very honest indicator of how much total energy is used. True green costs less, not more. But this isn't really about the environment, it's about leftists trying to force you to buy less stuff. Driving up the cost via government regulation is a brutally effective method.

24 posted on 08/18/2012 2:29:45 PM PDT by Reeses (An optimist believes the Republicans nominated their best. A pessimist knows they did.)
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To: Iron Munro
Why when my cats catch a mouse I always put them in milk bottles....

>> How do you get the cat through that little hole?


25 posted on 08/18/2012 4:17:07 PM PDT by a fool in paradise (Only Obama put a dog on the roof of his mouth. Dogs are friends, not food.)
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To: Former Proud Canadian

The plastic grocery bags came about out of recycled plastic milk gallon jugs.

Ecofreaks told us they were better for us than the paper bags. Then they changed their minds.

I use the paper bags for trash at home and carry them to the dumpster. I agree, they should decompose better than plastic.


26 posted on 08/18/2012 4:18:51 PM PDT by a fool in paradise (Only Obama put a dog on the roof of his mouth. Dogs are friends, not food.)
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This made me of littering in general. I am very well traveled. Nobody I have ever known anywhere in the US litters. There are exceptions, people with boats in the south always sink there beer bottles, not because they want to litter, but to eliminate evidence from the boat. I have seen campers here and there ditch beer bottles for the same reason. When I have seen people littering intentionally in the city, it has always been latinos, which may be a cultural thing, as I’ve been many places in Mexico and Central America where the streets looked like landfills. In the US, the more slummy areas in big cities tend to be trash recepticles. Also I remember driving from Louisiana to Texarkana Arkansas, and I remember a wall of garbage starting exactly at the Arkansas state line.


27 posted on 08/18/2012 4:51:25 PM PDT by dsrtsage (One half of all people have below average IQ. In the US the number is 54%)
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