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Looking Back at Lewis and Clark
The American Thinker ^ | September 3, 2012 | David M. Lenard

Posted on 09/03/2012 3:00:50 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

.......The Lewis and Clark expedition was filled with men who were exactly what McCunn was not: men who, like Drouilliard, didn't blink in the face of extreme danger. These frontiersmen could not only survive, but thrive, in an environment which was almost inconceivably dangerous to urbanized Americans today with our risk-phobic, pantywaist frappuccino culture. Drouilliard was the kind of guy you could drop in the middle of a remote jungle with nothing but a pocketknife, and return five years later to find that he had become emperor of his own mini-state, and taken several native wives. Drouilliard and the rest didn't need WiFi or hand sanitizer or organically grown phosphate-free arugula: they just did what needed to be done.

What a difference from today, where the handwringing of nervous housewives ("God forbid little Jimmy should encounter peanut traces in his food") dominates our daily existence, and the liberal imperative of nanny-state overregulation promises the illusion of lives lived in perfect safety and perfect comfort, without risk or suffering or even unpleasantness. Self-sufficiency is anathema to this mentality, but the Lewis and Clark expedition was self-sufficient to an almost unbelievable degree: they not only hunted their own food, but, when necessary, built their own boats; sewed their own clothes; and when it was too cold to travel, built their own forts -- not once, but twice.

In our modern republic, where large segments of our population compete to be declared helpless victims so they can receive government handouts, one cannot help but think that little Jimmy might benefit from being sent out with Drouilliard: "Here's a musket, son -- now go kill that deer, and don't miss, because if you do, there's a strong possibility you might starve."

(Excerpt) Read more at americanthinker.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: american; exceptionalism; resourceful; survival

1 posted on 09/03/2012 3:00:58 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Hard economic times may lie ahead where such skills may be necessary. Little Johnny with the peanut allergy may not survive.


2 posted on 09/03/2012 3:13:33 AM PDT by BipolarBob (Biden: "HOPE and CHAINS for all 57 states".)
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To: BipolarBob

300,000-350,000 on hemo-dialysis that is costing (mostly taxpayers) $72,000 per year not counting the meds. That’s over $21 billion a year that might be tempting for a death panel.


3 posted on 09/03/2012 3:18:36 AM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
I read Stephen Ambrose's Undaunted Courage - based on these journals - several years ago. It is a stunning story. Merriweather Lewis was 28 years old wheh the trip began.
4 posted on 09/03/2012 3:23:20 AM PDT by tx_eggman (Liberalism is only possible in that moment when a man chooses Barabas over Christ.)
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To: tx_eggman
.......Merriweather Lewis was 28 years old wheh the trip began.

Now, 26 year-olds brace themselves for the daunting challenge of paying for their own health insurance.

5 posted on 09/03/2012 3:29:06 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Sacajawea was of remarkable help to the expedition, but the peaceful presence of a “woman” by the indians was actually overshadowed by the frequent demonstration by Lewis of the remarkable air rifle of Austrian origin he carried with him and protected at all costs. It was a high caliber repeating air rifle with a capacity of, I think, 22 rounds. It astonished the indians during the entire journey and did more to prevent attacks than the presence of Sacajawea did. Here is a link for an exhaustive discussion of the technology of the weapon:

http://www.beemans.net/lewis-assault-rifle.htm


6 posted on 09/03/2012 3:55:17 AM PDT by givemELL (Does Taiwan eet the Criteria to Qualify as an "Overseas Territory of the United States"? by Richar)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Good article. Reminds me of a camping trip I went on a few years back when my kids were in scouting. Some of the men complained constantly. The night was too cold, the drinking water was too warm, the hike was too long, too many mosquitoes, on and on. When it came time to collect firewood, they’d drag a couple of skinny sticks over to the pile and consider themselves too exhausted to do anything else for the night. When it was time to go home though, they couldn’t get their vehicles loaded fast enough!


7 posted on 09/03/2012 4:08:37 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

“Now, 26 year-olds brace themselves for the daunting challenge of paying for their own health insurance.”

And the very tough decision of Adroid or Iphone.p


8 posted on 09/03/2012 4:25:16 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Encourage all of your Democrat friends to get out and vote on November 7th, the stakes are high.)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Our forebears had “something” that is sadly lacking today.....


9 posted on 09/03/2012 4:44:53 AM PDT by Minutemen ("It's a Religion of Peace")
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To: Minutemen

Man became “domesticated” in 1964 when the Beatles came over with their long hair and have been “feminized” ever since. :-)


10 posted on 09/03/2012 4:56:33 AM PDT by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: SamAdams76
The camping trip I'll never forget was my last Boy Scout summer camp (20 years ago). One of the kids tried to stash some junk food in his tent and ended up with a raccoon sitting on the foot of his cot at about 2am, snacking on his Oreos.

I ended up with Jerry in my tent for the rest of the night, sobbing loudly that he wanted to go home and get away from the horrible raccoon. I don't think I got any sleep for the rest of the night. Ugh!

11 posted on 09/03/2012 5:15:08 AM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: tx_eggman
I read Stephen Ambrose's Undaunted Courage - based on these journals - several years ago. It is a stunning story

One of the most enjoyable books I read
12 posted on 09/03/2012 5:34:50 AM PDT by uncbob
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To: Stonewall Jackson

Raccoons are cool to pet.


13 posted on 09/03/2012 5:51:53 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (let me ABOs run loose, lew (or is that lou?))
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To: Stonewall Jackson

At scout camp this summer, one of our boys decided he needed to puke...inside his sleeping bag. That was a mess like nothing I’d ever seen before. He spent most of the day in the infirmary sleeping off a fever. To his credit, he never once asked to go home even though he only lived 10 minutes away. I purposely never called his parents because he never asked me too.


14 posted on 09/03/2012 6:05:07 AM PDT by cyclotic (People who live within their means are increasingly being forced to pay for people who didn't.)
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To: givemELL

While he was impressive, a tribe looking at the L&C group would not have known about that rifle. They would see a woman and baby and prevented many untold attacks. Not to mention her translation help.


15 posted on 09/03/2012 6:20:22 AM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: cyclotic
I would say that the worst experience I ever had at summer camp was the year it rained the entire week. It was almost a constant rain from the time we got there on Sunday until we left Saturday morning.

Many of the activities were cancelled, the fish weren't biting, and we weren't able to complete our archery, astronomy, and rocketry merit badges.

It was quite depressing.

16 posted on 09/03/2012 6:25:27 AM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: HiTech RedNeck; Stonewall Jackson
Raccoons are cool to pet.

I was living at the AFRH in DC (I still keep my room paid for, but live away from it...), and was asked to be the "game warden". My job was to feed the Mallards, and wash down the decks from the 100+ Canadian Geese that live there. The Home has a golf course, which is a buffet to them, and the fishing ponds make for a good refuge from the foxes and raccoons.

The raccoons found me to be an easy touch. I kept my RV down there as a "smoke shack", since my cigars aren't welcome in the home. One evening, a young raccoon paid me a visit. He was gimpy on his left front leg, but could still use it to pick up the Cheerios that I gave him. You can see them in the bottom pic. The ducks are mom and five little ones, that I first saw when newly hatched. The building in the RV pic is the Protestant Chapel at the Home. The Lincoln cottage is nearby.

Another evening, I left some dinner scraps for him. He ate for a couple of minutes, then left. 30 minutes (or so) later, here he comes back with three more. I am standing in the doorway, watching, when a mom with two little ones walked right out by my feet.

I am on the road in my RV now, visiting family and friends in NC, and I miss seeing all of my "friends"!


17 posted on 09/03/2012 7:19:29 AM PDT by WVKayaker (I'm more than happy to be Obama's "enemy of the week" - Sarah Palin)
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To: autumnraine

They would see a woman and baby and prevented many untold attacks. Not to mention her translation help.

I have read that, to the Indians, a woman traveling with a group of men was an indication that it was NOT a war party.

Often such traveling groups were attacked anyway.


18 posted on 09/03/2012 8:01:39 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Tyrannies demand immense sacrifices of their people to produce trifles.-Marquis de Custine)
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To: Stonewall Jackson

***I would say that the worst experience I ever had at summer camp was the year it rained the entire week***

http://www.lyrics007.com/Spike%20Jones%20Lyrics/Hello%20Mother,%20Hello%20Father%20Lyrics.html

Hello muddah, hello faddah,
Here I am at Camp Granada.
Camp is very entertaining,
And they say we’ll have some fun if it stops raining!


19 posted on 09/03/2012 8:04:51 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Tyrannies demand immense sacrifices of their people to produce trifles.-Marquis de Custine)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

Probably later in the century, but remember that this was the first expedition. Not the pioneers. I think a lot of people get the time periods blurred. While there was some spanish, some French, some older vikings, this was the first AMERICANS and the other groups weren’t a threat to the land/territory. And at that point, neither were the Americans.

At the turn of the 19th century (late 1700’s to 1805 or so), the central plains Indians did not have contact with Americans. Obviously.

So for THIS time period, they did not see them as a war party and did not attack. 50 to 60 years later, once people started coming and claiming land, yes.


20 posted on 09/03/2012 9:43:15 AM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Merriweather Lewis was a great-great++++ uncle or cousin or some such thing to me. Not sure of the connection. But he produced a very interesting list of descendents and was also connected to the Washington/Jefferson bunch.


21 posted on 09/03/2012 10:28:08 AM PDT by EggsAckley ("There's an Ethiopian in the fuel supply!")
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To: WVKayaker
Many years ago (about 25 or so), a raccoon was severely injured when he stuck his face into the power transformer on the pole behind my parents' house. The blast blinded him and the fall broke one of his legs, but the game warden caught him and took him to Bernheim Forest, a local nature preserve.

The folks at Bernheim were able to set his leg and then sent him to another preserve, over near Lexington, which specializes in caring for disabled wildlife. They kept him in his own enclosure so that the other raccoons would not be able to take advantage of his blindness and steal his food. He ended up living for many more years and was a big hit with the visitors.

22 posted on 09/03/2012 11:35:57 AM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
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To: autumnraine

No doubt.

The air rifle was pulled out when needed, it was openly demonstrated, and the word spread in advance. For the time it was a spectacular bit of technology and it presaged Rooseveltian thoughts that it is good to “walk softly and carry a big stick”. Sacajawea and the baby certainly “walked softly” and the air rifle was available when needed.


23 posted on 09/03/2012 12:09:06 PM PDT by givemELL (Does Taiwan eet the Criteria to Qualify as an "Overseas Territory of the United States"? by Richar)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I read the journals. What I remember most is the entry that read, to the effect, “Today we covered a disappointing 19 miles.”


24 posted on 09/03/2012 12:14:42 PM PDT by Crawdad
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To: givemELL

I do not dispute the level of admiration the legend of his rifle would have created, I just hate it when people play down the brilliance of including her in the trip.


25 posted on 09/03/2012 12:21:18 PM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: autumnraine

There was no putdown at all. Ever, by anyone. I know of no one, ever, who has been critical of the choice of Sacajawea as a guide as having been nothing but an excellent choice. It is fact.

There is a great lack of general knowledge regarding the unusual technology L and C had with them in terms of the extraordinary rifle, and it has been simply added to already well known facts of the expedition, including the central role played by Sacajawea. The rifle is new technology not generally recognized as having been present and contributory to the success of the expedition.


26 posted on 09/03/2012 12:28:00 PM PDT by givemELL (Does Taiwan eet the Criteria to Qualify as an "Overseas Territory of the United States"? by Richar)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3077140/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/families-trace-lewis-clark-links/


27 posted on 09/03/2012 12:34:28 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: Crawdad
“Today we covered a disappointing 19 miles.”

Imagine.

28 posted on 09/03/2012 1:02:04 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: lonestar

From your link:

“The bicentennial celebration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Pacific Ocean has spurred interest in the descendant project, which was launched in 1999.

“They’ve been coming out of the woodwork,” Hargrove said.

Indeed, the 200-year commemoration has led to a broader interest in genealogy among Americans.

“It has absolutely rekindled interest in family history,” said Carol Bronson, executive director of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation in Great Falls, Mont. “People want ownership of the story, and then they feel a part of it.”


29 posted on 09/03/2012 1:04:39 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: tx_eggman

Great book.


30 posted on 09/03/2012 1:10:02 PM PDT by Madame Dufarge
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

“Hargrove” has since moved to TX and is a friend.


31 posted on 09/03/2012 1:25:12 PM PDT by lonestar (It takes a village of idiots to elect a village idiot.)
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To: lonestar

Bump!


32 posted on 09/03/2012 11:57:56 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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