Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

How to follow the money in rare-coin collecting
Market Watch ^ | 6 Sep 2012 | David B. Wilkerson

Posted on 09/06/2012 6:26:16 AM PDT by shove_it

Edited on 09/06/2012 6:28:35 AM PDT by Admin Moderator. [history]

This 1898 Liberty Head Half-Dollar is an example of a coin that received one grade and, upon resubmission, earned a higher grade and thus a higher market value.

CHICAGO (MarketWatch) Coin dealer James DiGeorgia saw it for just a moment a rare Roman gold coin he found extremely desirable but he hesitated before deciding to buy it.


(Excerpt) Read more at marketwatch.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: coin; coins; goldsilver; rarecoins

1 posted on 09/06/2012 6:26:18 AM PDT by shove_it
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: warsaw44

ping


2 posted on 09/06/2012 6:28:23 AM PDT by warsaw44
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: shove_it

can someone explain how it can be re-submitted to receive a higher grade on the coin.
Are there some questionable coin grading houses?


3 posted on 09/06/2012 6:49:37 AM PDT by conservativesister
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: conservativesister

I seem to remember the same thing happening in the baseball card trading hobby. That is why I am so hesitant to get into collectables.


4 posted on 09/06/2012 6:59:00 AM PDT by catfish1957 (My dream for hope and change is to see the punk POTUS in prison for treason)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: conservativesister

Grading is subjective, of course. In the earlier years of third party grading services, some firms tended to grade a coin on the conservative side. So, sometimes it pays to crack open the earlier slabs and see if the coin will get a better grade.


5 posted on 09/06/2012 6:59:32 AM PDT by Freedom4US
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Freedom4US
Grading is subjective, of course.

“An objective theory … does not permit the separation of ‘value’ from ‘purpose’ …” -- Ayn Rand

6 posted on 09/06/2012 7:11:34 AM PDT by OldNavyVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: conservativesister
Coin grading in highly subjective and every grader has an opinion. For that reason putting much trust in a fine shade of grading is a waste of time.
If I buy a coin I don't care whether it's been graded or not, I'm going to make my own judgment of what it's worth and pay accordingly and for that reason I'll bust any coin out of those fancy grading holders.
7 posted on 09/06/2012 7:13:47 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: count-your-change

I agree, grading is *very* subjective. Start with commoner coins where grade differences don’t affect the value so extremely. If you know how to grade accurately, you can sometimes buy “sleepers” from amateur dealers. Wear is only one factor. Some coins are not fully struck on one or both sides. Can you tell the difference between wear or a flat strike? How averse are you to nicks and rubs? How consistent is the patina? Has the coin been cleaned? Any rim damage or repaired holes? Beware of counterfeits or doctored dates and mint marks.

The photo grading guides are great for learning to evaluate many American coin patterns, but you have to develop your own sense of grade for foreign coins. The best way to learn grading is going to shows and thumbing through hundreds or thousands of coins in the trays. A quality 5x and 10x magnifying glass is a must. I even use a 30x stereo microscope to evaluate some coins — you can see the porosity of the metal!


8 posted on 09/06/2012 11:12:05 AM PDT by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: TexasRepublic; count-your-change
FRiends, do you think there are enough of us coin collectors on FR for a Coin Collecting ping list?
9 posted on 09/06/2012 8:49:42 PM PDT by warsaw44
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: warsaw44

I truly have no idea as the subject is not frequently discussed. My coin interests are very narrow, Morgan dollars, and only those of better quality.


10 posted on 09/06/2012 9:12:52 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: warsaw44

I would join the ping list if you end up having one!

We sell coins at auction....about 6-8/year. Have a small collection; but it’s truly fun to see, hold, photograph, and sell some of those that I will never be able to afford...LOL!


11 posted on 09/06/2012 9:16:39 PM PDT by garandgal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: garandgal

You run a coin auction company?? If so, we should talk. I’ve things I want to sell.

I once asked a group on a silver ping list ( if I recall correctly ) and there seemed to be heavy interest in a CC ping list.

But I don’t know how to run a ping list or even how to post an article on FR. Every time I have posted I’ve either screwed it up or not put it in the right place...

But the idea of fellow conservatives here on FR discussing coins, collecting, investments and the market really sounds great.


12 posted on 09/07/2012 10:44:01 AM PDT by warsaw44
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson