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Governor Mark Dayton says anti-tax attitude is killing progress
pioneer press ^ | 9-13-12 | billy salisbury

Posted on 09/13/2012 5:50:09 AM PDT by TurboZamboni

Count on Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton to swim against the tide.

As Republicans call for tax cuts and few Democrats advocate more government spending, Dayton says we need to pay higher taxes to meet public needs.

"This unwillingness to pay taxes ... is going to be the death of this country if it's not corrected," the Democratic governor said Wednesday, Sept. 12, in a speech at the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

A leading Republican tax policymaker quickly pounced on Dayton's statement, saying tax increases would drive jobs out of Minnesota.

"It's not that we're taxing too little. It's that the government is spending too much," said House Taxes Committee Chairman Greg Davids, R-Preston.

Dayton said the federal and state governments are heading for fiscal cliffs because of their unrealistic tax policies.

(Excerpt) Read more at twincities.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; News/Current Events; US: Minnesota
KEYWORDS: business; dayton; googleyes; marx; mn; profits; tax; taxes
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good old Marx Dayton...trying his best to make us Illinois or California.
1 posted on 09/13/2012 5:50:18 AM PDT by TurboZamboni
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To: TurboZamboni

Minnesota residents say Governor Mark Dayton is killing them with taxes.

FUMD


2 posted on 09/13/2012 5:52:43 AM PDT by TruthInThoughtWordAndDeed (Yahuah Yahusha)
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To: TurboZamboni
" Governor Mark Dayton says anti-tax attitude is killing progress "

Governor ? that's a irresponsible and reckless statement to say.

It's the anti-business attitude and over taxation of the government is what is hurting progress.
3 posted on 09/13/2012 5:54:47 AM PDT by American Constitutionalist (The fool has said in his heart, " there is no GOD " ..)
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To: TruthInThoughtWordAndDeed

At least he’s an honest Democrat, he want’s to make everyone pay more for more and more government spending. I bet he doesn’t cut the pay of his precious public employee unions though.

Reminds me of something Dave Barry said about the 1984 presidential election.

Walter Mondale was nominated and immediately announced that if elected, the first thing he would do is jack up everyone’s taxes. This proved so popular among voters that nobody voted for him except him and his wife (and we’re not so sure about his wife).


4 posted on 09/13/2012 5:55:30 AM PDT by TurboZamboni (Looting the future to bribe the present)
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To: TurboZamboni

Yes, boys and girls, the Governor Mark Dayton really IS this stupid. He never appears to have learned: “It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.”


5 posted on 09/13/2012 5:56:31 AM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: TurboZamboni

No Mark, YOUR SPENDING PRIORITIES have killed positive results!

Note: I use the term “positive results” due to the liberals bastardization of the term “progress”


6 posted on 09/13/2012 5:57:16 AM PDT by G Larry (Progressives are Regressive because their objectives devolve to the lowest common denominator.)
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To: TurboZamboni

This is why the Democratic Party is single greatest domestic threat to the United States since the founding of the Confederacy. Dayton and the rest of the Democrats are squandering resources with their decadence and dependency schemes, inhibiting productive capitalism with taxes, regulations and attitude and are impoverishing America


7 posted on 09/13/2012 5:58:48 AM PDT by allendale
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To: American Constitutionalist
>>It's the anti-business attitude and over taxation of by the government is what is hurting progress.<<
8 posted on 09/13/2012 5:59:16 AM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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To: TurboZamboni
"Our legacy is going to be that we were not willing to raise revenues for what we know we need," the governor said.

Well, the one thing that nobody wants to realistically address is: What we really need, rather than what we think we need or what we merely want. A lot of those so-called "needs" are merely "wants" to appease some demographic group.

Perhaps we should make a list of our needs, starting with police and fire protection, and go from there.

9 posted on 09/13/2012 5:59:47 AM PDT by Real Cynic No More
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To: TurboZamboni
trying his best to make us Illinois or California.

R/R ought to campaign there and ask the voters that very question.

10 posted on 09/13/2012 6:00:40 AM PDT by jersey117
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To: allendale

“Tax reduction thus sets off a process that can bring gains for everyone, gains won by marshalling resources that would otherwise stand idle—workers without jobs and farm and factory capacity without markets. Yet many taxpayers seemed prepared to deny the nation the fruits of tax reduction because they question the financial soundness of reducing taxes when the federal budget is already in deficit. Let me make clear why, in today’s economy, fiscal prudence and responsibility call for tax reduction even if it temporarily enlarged the federal deficit—why reducing taxes is the best way open to us to increase revenues. “

—President John F. Kennedy, Economic Report of the President, anuary 1963

If only more of today’s leaders thought like JFK.


11 posted on 09/13/2012 6:01:07 AM PDT by TurboZamboni (Looting the future to bribe the present)
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To: TurboZamboni

Virginia didn’t raise taxes and we have a surplus.

Just sayin’.


12 posted on 09/13/2012 6:01:15 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If you really want to annoy someone, point out something obvious that they are trying hard to ignore)
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To: TurboZamboni

We got one of these a-hole Governors here in Connecticut as well. These scum can’t think outside of the tax tables.


13 posted on 09/13/2012 6:04:11 AM PDT by raybbr (People who still support Obama are either a Marxist or a moron.)
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Dayton said the federal and state governments are heading for fiscal cliffs because of their unrealistic tax policies.

No bitch...

The federal and state governments are heading for fiscal cliffs because of their unrealistic communist policies.

14 posted on 09/13/2012 6:04:52 AM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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To: American Constitutionalist

I guess it all depends on what you mean by “progress”.

If you’re a leftist, “progress” is bigger government, more control over the people, and more collectivism.

If you’re a conservative, “progress” means increasing the standard of living for, and increasing the liberty of, all people.


15 posted on 09/13/2012 6:05:28 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working fors)
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To: TurboZamboni
—President John F. Kennedy, Economic Report of the President, January 1963...If only more of today’s leaders thought like JFK.

Yeah, well he was a Democrat. Look what happened to him in 1964.

16 posted on 09/13/2012 6:06:59 AM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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To: MasterGunner01

Same old argument from the left, we need to increase taxes....how about this, we control spending.

Note, I am not saying do away with programs, I am saying that no new programs are needed and those already on the books are probably too expensive but they can be controlled by just denying increases. Flat spending and taxes increasing on inflated dollars will mean these programs attrit down and the drain the budgets will be eliminated.

If we also decide to eliminate the completely superfluous programs, the strain on budgets will go down quicker IMO. Government just seems to want to expand without bounds and that has become the mantra of the left.

Here is one more idea, if you are here illegally, you get NADA. We go back to the old program wherein immigrants had sponsors and if they could not make their way, their sponsors paid their “benefits”.


17 posted on 09/13/2012 6:07:58 AM PDT by Mouton (Voting is an opiate of the electorate. Nothing changes no matter who wins..)
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To: TurboZamboni

Increasing revenues is never the goal of leftist taxation policy, no matter what they say.

The goal is the worst form of covetousness - not the wanting of what someone else has, but the wanting of someone else NOT TO HAVE IT.


18 posted on 09/13/2012 6:08:12 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working fors)
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To: MrB
If you’re a conservative, “progress” means increasing the standard of living for, and increasing the liberty of, all people.

Yes, but if you're a conservative you should damn well better know that "progressives" are Marxists.

19 posted on 09/13/2012 6:10:07 AM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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To: TurboZamboni

Go across your eastern border to Wisconsin, Minnesotans. We are correcting this kind of thinking in our politicians.


20 posted on 09/13/2012 6:11:55 AM PDT by freemama
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To: ROCKLOBSTER

—President John F. Kennedy, Economic Report of the President, January 1963...If only more of today’s leaders thought like JFK.
Yeah, well he was a Democrat. Look what happened to him in 1964.

One small correction, that was november 63. Of course then in came the Great Society ideas of that jerk from Texas.

Kennedy was also in favor of reduced or eliminated tariffs. He noted the correlation between higher tariffs and reduced trade. I wrote a paper about this in school in 62 prasing his idea but then again that was at a time Economics was actually taught and studied.


21 posted on 09/13/2012 6:12:39 AM PDT by Mouton (Voting is an opiate of the electorate. Nothing changes no matter who wins..)
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To: ROCKLOBSTER
Thank you for the correction.


22 posted on 09/13/2012 6:17:55 AM PDT by American Constitutionalist (The fool has said in his heart, " there is no GOD " ..)
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To: ROCKLOBSTER

Funny thing, that “progressive” moniker -

when fascism became “unfascionable” in the late thirties and early forties, the fascist supporters here in America started calling themselves “progressives”, then when that label came to be understood for what it was, they became “liberals”, and now they’re “progressives” again.

A “Progressive” promotes “progress”, but only if that “progress” is toward more centralized control and less individual liberty.


23 posted on 09/13/2012 6:24:03 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working fors)
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To: raybbr

Just had to pay $4.15 for gas today and I was thinking about our Governor and the illegals with library cards. My friends will not come back to CT and I told them, “h$ll, you are paying $8 for Lukoil and your complaining about $4?” We had a laugh but it really was not funny.


24 posted on 09/13/2012 6:26:01 AM PDT by cameraeye (A happy kaffir!)
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To: Mouton

Exactly what has been the positive impact of the free trade policies of the last 20 years? The standard of living of the average household has declined. The US industrial infrastructure has been gutted and our enemy China is becoming a world power thanks to outsourcing of our manufacturing. The value of the dollar has declined and we have run massive trade deficits. How has this free trade with mercantilist nations helped the average citizen or contributed to our economic strength?


25 posted on 09/13/2012 6:29:26 AM PDT by Soul of the South
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To: TurboZamboni
This unwillingness to pay taxes ... is going to be the death of this country

No, unwillingness to let the government control everything is the heart and soul of this country.

26 posted on 09/13/2012 6:38:54 AM PDT by libertylover (The problem with Obama is not that his skin is too black, it's that his ideas are too RED.)
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To: TurboZamboni

Dayton says we need to pay higher taxes to meet public needs.

How about we get really specific here about needs, Mark baby.

I might remind you of the 40% Federal deficit, which means of every Federal dollar coming into MN, at least 40% is borrowed bucks.

What that means is you and yours are in the hole before you even start your budget negotiations, and that is why revenue is not the solution you leftists think it is. There is already way too much “revenue” floating around. Revenue that is borrowed bucks, is in reality NOT revenue at all is it? It is on the other side of the ledger.

Until we get a handle on expenditures, Government does not
deserve a dime increase in so called revenue. So now maybe
you will understand the “people’s” antagonism to tax increases.

...but I doubt you will ever understand!


27 posted on 09/13/2012 6:39:47 AM PDT by wita
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To: TurboZamboni

YEs, killing progress by keeping greedy politicians from further looting the pockets of the productive in society to buy the votes of the parasites, unions, and various other progs who support the kenyan marxist pig.


28 posted on 09/13/2012 6:40:30 AM PDT by Neoliberalnot (Marxism works well only with the uneducated and the unarmed.)
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To: TurboZamboni

nothing new, they’ve been out there spewing that “Grover Norquist is Public Enemy #1” for some time now.


29 posted on 09/13/2012 6:45:26 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Soul of the South

Why not cut out a lot of the pork by doing a historical analysis of all the current pork as opposed to the past pork to determine how much has been added over the years and then see what we can really get by on? When every classroom has a new computer for every kid ever year and the police cars are always new or only 2 yrs old you have a problem. Now I know those items are generally paid for by local taxes, however many grants are given by the federal government too. We are already taxed to death paying income taxes, property taxes, sales taxes, fuel taxes, toll fees, inspection / registration fees on autos, high leisure item taxes, oil disposal taxes, Spanish American War taxes...so WHAT THE HE’LL are they saying we don’t enough taxes for. America needs a reset button. Liberals want everyone ELSE to pay THEIR share.


30 posted on 09/13/2012 6:46:41 AM PDT by jsanders2001
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To: ROCKLOBSTER

November 22, 1963


31 posted on 09/13/2012 6:48:03 AM PDT by jsanders2001
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To: TurboZamboni

Like California, Minnesota businesses are fleeing the high taxes and moving to lower tax states. Neighboring South Dakota has no state income tax and lower business taxes and is benefiting from Minnesota’s high taxes.


32 posted on 09/13/2012 6:54:58 AM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: Mouton
Here's a simple idea: cut out duplicate public benefits and agencies! You'd get immediate savings.

For example, on the national level, how many departments and agencies are ministering to the American Indians on their reservations? If you said the Bureau of Indian Affairs, you'd be naming only one of 17! What do these other 16 do that is so important? We should pare them to one and get rid of the duplication (and excess government drones).

33 posted on 09/13/2012 6:59:41 AM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: AppyPappy

“Virginia didn’t raise taxes and we have a surplus.”

Florida just reported that it also has a surplus.


34 posted on 09/13/2012 7:02:17 AM PDT by sergeantdave (The FBI has declared war on the Marine Corps)
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To: TurboZamboni

Well it certainly does throw a stick in the spokes of the wheel of Progressivism!!


35 posted on 09/13/2012 7:02:31 AM PDT by mo (If you understand, no explanation is needed. If you don't understand, no explanation is possible.)
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To: MasterGunner01
Yes, boys and girls, the Governor Mark Dayton really IS this stupid. He never appears to have learned

He's not stupid at all, look where he is. The people who voted for him OTO are really stupid and probably extremely lazy as well. Looters who plunder and squander like Dayton don't get elected by accident. They get elected because the represent the attitudes of the majority of the voters (plus some fraud) in their respective districts.

36 posted on 09/13/2012 7:31:12 AM PDT by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: TurboZamboni

We already have 25% of our labor force not paying taxes because they aren’t working.

If we don’t fix the structural issues in the economy including restoring import tariffs, nobody will be paying taxes and government won’t haven any money or credit left.


37 posted on 09/13/2012 7:42:01 AM PDT by DannyTN
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To: TurboZamboni

We already have 25% of our labor force not paying taxes because they aren’t working.

If we don’t fix the structural issues in the economy including restoring import tariffs, nobody will be paying taxes and government won’t haven any money or credit left.


38 posted on 09/13/2012 7:42:12 AM PDT by DannyTN
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To: TurboZamboni
Dayton says we need to pay higher taxes to meet public needs.

If those in need of "public funds" don't get them, they'll move elsewhere.

39 posted on 09/13/2012 7:48:43 AM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Congrats to Ted Kennedy! He's been sober for two years now!!)
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To: wita

Public “needs” like Vikings stadium,Gopher stadium,Saints stadium, etc...


40 posted on 09/13/2012 8:03:32 AM PDT by TurboZamboni (Looting the future to bribe the present)
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To: sergeantdave

The leftards here would say those states don’t have the “quality of life” MN does...and then cite all the theatre and sports events.( that most people cannot afford to take their family to.)


41 posted on 09/13/2012 8:11:07 AM PDT by TurboZamboni (Looting the future to bribe the present)
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To: TurboZamboni

Minnesota? Illinois? Wisconsin suggests a new type of Governor.


42 posted on 09/13/2012 8:18:09 AM PDT by stocksthatgoup (Wealth = Net Worth ///// Income = Net Work)
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To: Soul of the South

The free trade policies should never have been considered as the basis for firms to outsource US production. In fact as multinationals began this move, it should have been stopped. The idea of no tarriff policies are simply to ensure we could sell domestically made US goods abroad free from local protectionism and visa versa. At the time of Kennedy, there were little foreign manufactured goods imported and we were basically energy independant.

Firms, both domestic and foreign owned, decided to take advantage of the benefit of cheaper foreign labor and you have what we got now. The flip side was consumers are able to obtain lower cost goods, during the 60s and 70s.

As far as NAFTA goes which I believe you are addressing, there was amble argument against it, primarily from none other than Ross Perot who saw the danger.

In the end, it all comes down to dollars, who is spending them, who is collecting taxes, and whom is making profits. There is no easy solution. We could easily raise tariffs upon all imported goods and what happens? We support local labor and production and raise prices for consumers. That is what laisse faire is all about.


43 posted on 09/13/2012 8:18:23 AM PDT by Mouton (Voting is an opiate of the electorate. Nothing changes no matter who wins..)
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To: TurboZamboni
Dayton, the department store heir, lamented the passing of the view of his father's generation that people who were doing better financially should pay more taxes.

"Now people want to make more money and pay less taxes or no taxes or get a rebate," he said.

Why the nerve of some people! Wanting to make more money and pay less in taxes!

44 posted on 09/13/2012 8:26:51 AM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Congrats to Ted Kennedy! He's been sober for two years now!!)
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To: Mouton

The founding fathers viewed “free trade” as the ability to trade with any nation without being restricted by the national government, not the absence of tariffs and quotas. In fact the federal government was funded almost 100% by high tariffs throughout the 19th century. Not only did high tariffs and quotas fund the national government, they allowed US industry to develop and flourish without being undercut by European producers.

I have worked in the US apparel industry from the 1970’s to the present. Textiles and apparel have been hit hard by the policies put in place by the free trade movement of the early 1990’s. CAFTA and WTO did much more damage to the US apparel industry than NAFTA. In fact the admission of China to the WTO, eliminating quotas and dramatically reducing tariffs while the Chinese pursued mercantilist trade policies, was probably the largest contributing factor to the gutting of the US manufacturing sector.

In opening up our markets, while not realizing 100% reciprocity and not punishing cheating (i.e. currency manipulation, transshipments, intellectual property violations, direct government subsidies of exports and capital to expand production in export industries, and exploitation of human capital) we essentially put our industry into an untenable position. Add to that increasing regulatory burdens on domestic firms, the increasing exploitation of industry by parasitic tort attorneys, and the equity markets shift from financing long term investment to short term speculation and we had the perfect storm to dramatically dismantle in less than 2 decades an industrial infrastructure that had been built over 150 years.

My experience in the apparel business was free trade served initially to boost margins of the domestic companies that shifted from manufacturing in the USA to importing. Companies such as Hanes, Levi, Warnaco, VF, Philips Van Heusen eliminated hundreds of thousands of lower middle class factory jobs by shifting to an contract import model. They did not lower consumer prices. Instead they increased profits and redeployed those profits to consolidate the industry through acquisitions.

The Chinese government collaborated with these companies by financing the construction of factories to supply the importers. Throughout the 1990’s and early 2000’s the Chinese government would fund construction and equipping of textile factories with interest free loans and a 15% rebate paid to the company for goods exported from China. At the same time, low labor costs were sustained by the government supporting peasant migration from rural areas to the cities. With these incentives, investment flowed into the construction of Chinese factories while the US factories were being dismantled. Rural textile towns in the southeastern US went from thriving middle class communities to high unemployment economic wastelands. This in turn resulted in burgeoning social welfare costs which were passed to the taxpayers. The story was similar in many other assembly industries employing relatively unskilled labor.

A century ago the big Wall Street banks invested in hard assets - railroads, ships, factories and buildings. These were long term investments in productive infrastructure which contributed to economic development and growing the national wealth. Today, Wall Street seems to engage in short term financial manipulation, churning stocks in nanoseconds or creating exotic financial instruments for which it is difficult to ascertain real value. A railroad locomotive, a factory, an airplane, or a ship have real tangible value and a productive life of decades yet Wall Street is loath to invest capital in these types of assets within the US. As a result the government has stepped in to provide capital to developing industries, with poor results (Solyndra for example). The dearth of investment capital to finance hard assets for small and medium size companies is a major economic issue which receives almost no recognition in the media or political world, yet solving the problem is essential to restoring America’s industrial might. It has only been 3 years since we were in an environment where a bank would loan a individual with a tenuous job and poor credit history hundreds of thousands of dollars to purchase a house with no money down. That same bank would not finance the purchase of several hundred thousands of dollars worth of equipment for a rapidly growing small business, even with a note secured by the assets and with a substantial down payment.

I would like to see the US exit all of the current tariff agreements and move to a flat % tax rate on all imports (manufacturing, agriculture and energy) equal to the corporate income tax in place. If the corporate tax rate is 35%, we should have a 35% tariff. If it is 15%, we should have a 15% tariff. Consider that a fee for access to the market as well as an appropriate leveling of the playing field for US companies competing with government subsidized factories. Obviously we also need to have regulatory and tort reform as well to restart investment in US manufacturing and domestic energy production.

To “fix” the investment equation, we need to reinstate Glass Steagall, in order to separate speculative investment banking from what should be more conservative retail banking thereby eliminating “too big to fail” taxpayer funded bailouts from the system. We cannot have a healthy economy, with efficient allocation of capital, when the bankers are protected from risk by the government. Finally, we need to return to sound fiscal policies at all levels of government and refocus the Federal Reserve on fighting inflation and preserving a strong dollar.


45 posted on 09/13/2012 9:07:32 AM PDT by Soul of the South
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To: The Great RJ

Dang right we are, BUT SD still gets more Federal money than from its own citizens, which means the budget is out of balance by 40% of the total of Federal monies received.

NOT good, and literally every state in the Union accepting federal money, is in precisely the same situation.


46 posted on 09/13/2012 9:19:45 AM PDT by wita
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To: DannyTN

We already have 25% of our labor force not paying taxes because they aren’t working.

Not to mention the 47% that are working, (we think) and don’t pay federal income taxes because of tax law. No skin in the game and they are NOT paying their fair share.


47 posted on 09/13/2012 9:29:36 AM PDT by wita
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To: Soul of the South

How we ever agreed for China to fall under the auspices of GATT never ceased to amaze me. A long ago dead person one time told me when I was a lad, we are going to sell rope to our enemies with which they will hang us. I guess your long diatrob underscores his commentary.

I have a problem applying how things worked in the 18th 19th and the very early part of the 20th century to today’s world though. Yes we did fund our government through tarriffs and excise taxes. Yes, tariffs, and quotas, supported US industry. We were a growing nation at that time and pretty much self sufficient. That is not the case today.

I agree we should never have allowed companies to move their production off shore as a consequence of our trade agreements. We did it unfortunately and now the question becomes can we put the genie back in the bottle.

NAFTA was just a hemispherical agreement in furtherance of the road we cut for ourselves.

You also correctly note in that we did nothing to punish cheating like currency manipulations, intellectual theft or out right fraud.

I like you idea of applying a corporate tax rate import fee. It would do two things...raise revenue and decrease imports. Of course consumer costs would go up but I believe the trade off of higher costs verses a lowered trade deficit, support for domestic manufacturing and a lower fiscal deficit far outweigh the costs.


48 posted on 09/13/2012 1:54:25 PM PDT by Mouton (Voting is an opiate of the electorate. Nothing changes no matter who wins..)
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To: Mouton

Having been involved in both domestic and offshore manufacturing for over 35 years, in most cases US manufacturing can be competitive with 10% to 20% of Asian costs, if all costs are accurately calculated and the US operation is efficiently managed. Asian quality is difficult to manage and company’s often accept inferior materials or assembly in order to get a better price. Compare apples and apples, plus insist that quality standards will be maintained and the factory will eat the total cost of customer returns and you suddenly improve the cost equation by 5-10%.

Companies often don’t fully allocate actual (not theoretical) transportation costs, administrative overhead costs, and most don’t calculate the higher inventory investment for Asia imports or the real cost of late deliveries. Typically product development costs are also higher due to the need to base PD people in Asia or fly them back and forth. Make sure all of the indirect costs are properly allocated to the imports and the cost equation can improve by another 10%.

Finally, there is the cost to the US taxpayer of supporting imports - the services of customs, the Navy protecting the sea lanes, port construction, harbour dredging, the Coast Guard, as well as maintaining the internal infrastructure used by imports (roads, bridges, airports). If domestic production pays for the use of these services via a 35% corporate tax rate and the Asian factories get a free ride, domestic companies are at a tremendous disadvantage. Assessing a import fee equal to the corporate tax rate would seem to be an equitable way of insuring imports, not the taxpayer, should pay for these very real costs. None of the costs of maintaining the import infrastructure should be born by the taxpayer, they should be covered by the users of the infrastructure and services.

Based on how the import supply chain typically deals with rising raw materials on energy and commodities I estimate if we assess a 35% tax rate on imports about 50% of the increase will be passed to the consumer and the other15% will be absorbed in the supply chain or subsidized by the government of the exporting nation. The real economic benefits to the USA will be higher revenue to the treasury as well as real economic incentives (not direct government subsidies) to make existing US manufacturing more efficient and for Wall Street to make investments in domestic manufacturing.

Finally, the government should take a very aggressive approach with respect to non-tariff barriers and subsidies of exports by foreign governments. If we know the Chinese government is rebating 15% of the value of exports to a factory, the US government should assess an additional 15% tariff on imports of that class of goods. If intellectual property laws are being flagrantly violated, imports of that class of goods should be embargoed until the violations subsist. If other nations apply non tariff fees to US goods coming into the country, say a container fee or customs fees, we should be reciprocal in the assessment of these fees.


49 posted on 09/13/2012 4:09:04 PM PDT by Soul of the South
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To: American Constitutionalist

Just jivin ya. I knew what you meant.


50 posted on 09/13/2012 6:49:47 PM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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