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Watch That Last Step, It's a Doozy
The American Thinker ^ | September 22, 2012 | Daren Jonescu

Posted on 09/22/2012 2:16:51 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

As any mature radical will tell you, the great advantage of a gradual unraveling, as opposed to the more colorful sudden insurrection, is that in the latter case, everyone knows what is happening and, if so inclined, may resist, whereas the former method is akin to the stealthy burglar who steals your jewels while you sleep. You might wake up and carry on with your life for days before realizing you have lost your prized possessions and family heirlooms. And by then it is too late.

......One invaluable tool in the radical's belt, however, is sometimes overlooked. This is the natural human weakness--on display every day, everywhere--for breaking a long process into its discernible stages, and then judging the significance of each stage relative to the whole, so that each stage appears less noteworthy than the preceding ones, as the growing whole proportionately diminishes each new part. This tendency of our thinking can prevent us from recognizing all sorts of gradual developments, both positive and negative. It allows us to observe incremental changes in our bodily condition over time without ever deducing that we have developed a serious illness, for example.

In the modern political context, this phenomenon helps to explain the blank stares or rolling eyes one meets when talking to people about the multifaceted catastrophe -- economic, social, and moral--that looms just ahead of the Western world on its present path. "What are you getting all worked up about?" is a typical response, and a sure sign you are witnessing the psychological weakness in question. You, looking at the whole process, see an ever-expanding threat. They, focused only on the discrete stages -- each one seeming smaller than the last, compared to the whole -- see ever-shrinking dots against an amorphous gray background. "What's the big deal?"

(Excerpt) Read more at americanthinker.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Editorial; Government
KEYWORDS: froginpot; marxist; socialism
This is a well written piece - an invaluable tool to help those who don't get it, get it.

Share it, so those who need it will see it.

1 posted on 09/22/2012 2:17:03 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

It put into context, why people aren’t storming Washington.


2 posted on 09/22/2012 2:21:48 AM PDT by lulu16 (May the Good Lord take a liking to you!)
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To: Travis McGee; familyop

A ping about boiling frogs.


3 posted on 09/22/2012 2:30:16 AM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum)
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To: lulu16; Tainan; All

Another good article for sharing:

“Why I’m Not a Libertarian”

“........The problem lies in the fact that Mises says society exists primarily for purposes of production, and must essentially create law to result in the maximum protection thereof. When Mises reduces civilization to production, every ounce of romance is lost, every bit of glory stripped, and every ounce of patriotism defiled.

If our ancestors died so that we could experience wealth, I suppose there’s some quasi-goodness in that. But if all for which civilization exists is luxury — not for defending justice in the name of God, the triumph of good over evil, nor other high ideals — then not only is their sacrifice cheapened, but it is almost a waste. Mises’ work makes virtue and vice distinguishable only by outcome, and makes the tragic hero merely tragic; it entirely circumvents the wisdom of Madison, who said that justice is the sole aim of government, and that should justice not be pursued, liberty would be lost. Mises didn’t revere our Founding Fathers; he intended to establish a new form of society, antithetical to our founding principles and Christianity.

Consider, further, what Mises’ philosophy implicitly declares about practicality. In making subjectively defined pleasurable cooperation the chief measure of morality, libertarianism proclaims that virtue needn’t be heeded when she beckons men to suffer, that justice is not the end of government, but the means. Will our chaplains call soldiers to fight valiantly, providing a mathematical formula which explains how the greater pleasure will be achieved on the whole? Mises says such calculations would be absurd, yet how else could one argue to a truly praxeologically minded society? Are we dogs, begging at Pleasure’s table for scraps of food, rolling and sitting, wagging and lifting the paw only on Her command? Or do we suffer in dignity, even should Pleasure retract her scraps? Doesn’t true pleasure come from something higher — a call to duty, the rallying cry to honor, to immortality, to heaven? Mises’ civilization defends nothing of the sort; it lowers man’s gaze from the sky to the barren desert sand, and confuses the human soul with that of a logical ape’s.

One may of course say that men, living under a libertarian government, aren’t necessarily bound to fight simply for the reasons the government says they fight; we say they can fight in the name of family, or friends, or even in the name of God. But subjectivity is a poor banner under which to die, a foundation comprising anything but the meaningful. Yes, men may individually stand for meaningful things: as Bastiat reasoned, the state’s refusal to subsidize farming doesn’t imply that it is against grain. But grain is very different from unalienable rights. Grain doesn’t need a firm metaphysical foundation for farming to exist; unalienable rights require a specific Deity. And while I wouldn’t for one second infer that the state must form its own religion, religious principles are the foundation for any meaningful system of law, a common discernment between what is right and what seems right, regardless of whether or not what’s right is pleasurable. One can only wonder how long justice can possibly last when men are swindled, with statistical calculations and empty promises, into trampling the rights of others to find jobs, to balance the distribution of wealth and joy, or to promote happiness for their particular race........”

http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/09/why_im_not_a_libertarian.html


4 posted on 09/22/2012 2:58:19 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Rust never sleeps, nuff sed


5 posted on 09/22/2012 3:35:29 AM PDT by ronnie raygun (bb)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
“Why I’m Not a Libertarian”

Libertarians are needed to fill the gap that was evacuated when the Dems kept movinf left. Except for the Rpubs also moving left 9although at a slightly slower pace), the Libertarians would have to be the majority party in order to fill the gap.

6 posted on 09/22/2012 5:35:21 AM PDT by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

The coming election will tell if our society finally has finished its descent in to the abyss of socialism and is comfortable and willing to adopt mediocrity and corruption in exchange for what made this nation great. In my humble opinion this will be “The Mother of all Elections” deciding the direction and fate of this nation.

If you don’t have time for politics, don’t worry, politicians will love you for it, as it gives them a better chance to cheat and steal from you. If our current economic and financial conundrum hasn’t taught you enough, chances are better than good that you are either a slow learner or the gates are down and no train is coming and probably never will.


7 posted on 09/22/2012 5:48:22 AM PDT by saintgermaine
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Same way Satan works in your life and in the denigration of a culture.


8 posted on 09/22/2012 6:31:19 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
This is simply the "salami slice" technique. No individual slice is worth getting upset about, but before you know it, you've reached the bellybutton at the end of the salami, and there's nothing left.
9 posted on 09/22/2012 6:31:26 AM PDT by JoeFromSidney ( New book: RESISTANCE TO TYRANNY. Buy from Amazon.)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

“is akin to the stealthy burglar who steals your jewels while you sleep.”

I’ve heard someting like this before but it goes “It will came like a thief in the night”.


10 posted on 09/22/2012 6:33:10 AM PDT by fella ("As it was before Noah, so shall it be again")
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