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2012 SAT Reading Scores Lowest Since 1972
NPR ^ | 09/24/2012 | EYDER PERALTA

Posted on 09/24/2012 7:54:27 PM PDT by SeekAndFind

NPR's Claudio Sanchez brings us this bit of bad academic news: The class of 2012 scored the lowest average SAT reading score since 1972. A bit of good news is that math scores were up.

Claudio filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Writing, too, is down nine points since the SAT introduced a writing section in 2006. The average score in math was 514 out of 800, five points higher than it was 40 years ago.

"Just under 1.7 million high school seniors took the test. Nearly half were racial or ethnic minorities. A fourth did not grow up speaking English at home. Asians outscored White, Black and Latinos. But overall, according to the College Board which commissions the SAT's, 6 in ten test takers are not prepared for college level work. Experts say this is a clear indication that academically, high schools are just not rigorous enough."

In a press release, College Board President Gaston Caperton said these scores should be a "call to action to expand access to rigor for more students."

"Our nation's future depends on the strength of our education system. When less than half of kids who want to go to college are prepared to do so, that system is failing," he said.

And, as we've reported, this kind of news just keeps coming. In Sept. 2011, we reported that the reading scores were already in bad shape then. And, last month, we reported that according to the ACT , just "25 percent of high schoolers who took the test are college ready."



TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: college; education; sat

1 posted on 09/24/2012 7:54:30 PM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Doesn’t make sense since they redid the scoring. I wonder if they take that into consideration. For example, they have to write an essay now.


2 posted on 09/24/2012 7:55:58 PM PDT by napscoordinator (GOP Candidate 2020 - "Bloomberg 2020 - We vote for whatever crap the GOP puts in front of us.")
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To: napscoordinator

It’s simple. The teachers just need more money. /s


3 posted on 09/24/2012 8:01:50 PM PDT by Right Brother
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To: SeekAndFind

Asserting that reading scores in 1972 were as low as today’s is ridiculous. There is no way in hell.


4 posted on 09/24/2012 8:04:45 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: skeeter
Asserting that reading scores in 1972 were as low as today’s is ridiculous. There is no way in hell.

I'd love to compare the raw scores. If, in 1972, 85 correct out of 140 gave you a score of 450, and now, if 80 correct out of 140 gives you a score of 450, that, to me, doesn't mean the scores are equivalent. They might call 80 out of 140 an 800. Maybe I shouldn't give them any ideas.

(My numbers are just illustrative, not based upon actual scoring, other than the fact that they "recentered" the results several years ago so that fewer correct answers are now needed to get scores that are equivalent to those on tests administered before the "recentering.")

5 posted on 09/24/2012 8:18:08 PM PDT by TruthShallSetYouFree (When the Obama poster fades, the portrait of Che Guevara beneath it shows through.)
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To: skeeter
Comparisons between this SAT and a 1972 SAT are pure baloney.

There is a 200 point increase awarded in the baseline score in each of both math and verbal that did not exist in 1972.

In normalized terms SAT scores have declined every year since 1978. The basis point increase is not the only change that makes year-over-year comparisons difficult: the penalty for guessing has been lowered, a subjective (essay) section worth 800 points has been added, and the scaling (i.e.curve) is constantly being "improved," to, as Michael Mann might say "hide the decline."

Everybody who has taught undergrads in the last 40 years has noticed this; it's even obvious in our top math, science, and engineering students.

6 posted on 09/24/2012 8:27:28 PM PDT by FredZarguna (Spontaneous demonstrators with RPGs. Sure.)
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To: TruthShallSetYouFree; skeeter

The test was “renormed” in the 90s, which effectively raised scores by about 150 points in total on the verbal and math.

The College Board i spart of the ed establishment, and they have been lying for a long time to cover up the failure of government schools and our highly trained education professionals.


7 posted on 09/24/2012 8:29:52 PM PDT by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: achilles2000

Old New New
Verbal Math
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8 posted on 09/24/2012 8:37:27 PM PDT by jwalsh07 (.)
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To: SeekAndFind

I recently got an iced tea at a 7-11. Price was $2.02. I gave the kid a twenty and two cents. Kid looked flummoxed. He had to enter the data into the register to realize that I was due $18 in return.


9 posted on 09/24/2012 8:40:48 PM PDT by Rembrandt (Part of the 51% who pay Federal taxes)
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To: achilles2000

Normed in 1996. For instance a 1992 math score of 480 would be equivalent to a 2012 score of 514. Of course thw difficulty of the materialnow is easier than back in the day. English scores are even worse. America is in a world of hurt.


10 posted on 09/24/2012 8:41:41 PM PDT by jwalsh07 (.)
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To: achilles2000

Mean SAT score for all schools was 491 which would be the equivalent of 410 in 1992. Time to norm again.


11 posted on 09/24/2012 8:51:29 PM PDT by jwalsh07 (.)
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To: FredZarguna
"Everybody who has taught undergrads in the last 40 years has noticed this; it's even obvious in our top math, science, and engineering students." >

I just started teaching high school biology and physical science after a mid-life career change. I'm appalled at what I'm seeing. Of the incoming freshmen in our urban parochial school, about half have reading levels below 5th grade. Some of the conduct issues are a learning impediment and stress me out. What really breaks my heart though is seeing these high school age kids who cannot extract meaning from a textbook to save their lives. I don't know how on earth I'm going to teach them anything resembling the content standard when they read on such a low level.

High school rigor is only part of the problem. The bigger issue is that they are not learning what they need at lower levels. These are failures of elementary education which never really get addressed.

12 posted on 09/24/2012 8:52:54 PM PDT by Think free or die
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To: SeekAndFind

The SAT was ‘recentered’ in 2002 because the original scale was based on male, white, Ivy league scores. The PDF titled “The Recentering of
SAT® Scales and Its Effects
on Score Distributions and
Score Interpretations” is located here: http://professionals.collegeboard.com/profdownload/pdf/200211_20702.pdf
and it explains why SAT was ‘recentered in 2002’. But here’s a quote:

“The testtaking
population was no longer mostly restricted to a
selective self-selected group of students applying to Ivy
League colleges and other prestigious Eastern colleges.
World War II had changed the role of women. The GI
Bill had expanded educational opportunity. College
Board member colleges had gone from 44 to 350
between 1941 and 1961, nearly a nine-fold increase.
Many of these new colleges came from the South and
the West. Scholarship programs had also expanded
opportunity. These increases in educational opportunity
resulted in changed populations and presented scaling
problems for the 1941-42 scales.”


13 posted on 09/24/2012 8:59:43 PM PDT by ransomnote
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To: Rembrandt
Price was $2.02. I gave the kid a twenty and two cents. Kid looked flummoxed. He had to enter the data into the register to realize that I was due $18 in return. <

Did you get the wide-eyed question, "Did you do that...in your head?"

14 posted on 09/24/2012 9:10:43 PM PDT by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA; Ignorance on parade.)
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To: Think free or die
If you have conduct issues in a parochial school, the public school must be a combat zone.

I was never interested in religious education, and my parents weren't either, so I was in public school until 8th grade. After the first year of Junior High, I'd had enough. I literally learned NOTHING in an entire year; the place was a friggin' zoo. We had ARMED security in each wing and on every floor of that place -- and this was in 1967. After the Easter Break, a ninth grader came into a votech class and shot his girlfriend and the shop teacher who tried to reason with him. I can't even imagine what goes on there now. I do know that in the last ten years or so that I've been following the school it has never come in higher than 480 in theTribune Reviews PA school district rankings. Two of those years it was not even on the list (came in lower than #500.)

I couldn't believe how different the Catholic School was. It goes without saying the nuns were punitive and nasty. But you could actually learn there...

Anyway, having taught undergrads for around a decade in the 1980's the decline was clearly visible over that period. I never used my Physics PhD and have been considering teaching math and/or science as a retirement option. The kicker: my Alma Mater wants (minimum) $30K for a teaching certification. But that's another story ...

15 posted on 09/24/2012 9:17:36 PM PDT by FredZarguna (Spontaneous demonstrators with RPGs. Sure.)
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To: Think free or die
If you have conduct issues in a parochial school, the public school must be a combat zone.

I was never interested in religious education, and my parents weren't either, so I was in public school until 8th grade. After the first year of Junior High, I'd had enough. I literally learned NOTHING in an entire year; the place was a friggin' zoo. We had ARMED security in each wing and on every floor of that place -- and this was in 1967. After the Easter Break, a ninth grader came into a votech class and shot his girlfriend and the shop teacher who tried to reason with him. I can't even imagine what goes on there now. I do know that in the last ten years or so that I've been following the school it has never come in higher than 480 in theTribune Reviews PA school district rankings. Two of those years it was not even on the list (came in lower than #500.)

I couldn't believe how different the Catholic School was. It goes without saying the nuns were punitive and nasty. But you could actually learn there...

Anyway, having taught undergrads for around a decade in the 1980's the decline was clearly visible over that period. I never used my Physics PhD and have been considering teaching math and/or science as a retirement option. The kicker: my Alma Mater wants (minimum) $30K for a teaching certification. But that's another story ...

16 posted on 09/24/2012 9:20:06 PM PDT by FredZarguna (Spontaneous demonstrators with RPGs. Sure.)
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To: FredZarguna

Public schools were a combat zone when I graduated in the 90s.


17 posted on 09/24/2012 9:35:04 PM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: SeekAndFind
Check out the Breitbart report of the same story.

Obama's America: Student Reading SAT Scores Hit Record Lows

Neither story mentions the impact of immigration, legal and illegal. They just mention that somehow we have all these students who can't speak English.

18 posted on 09/24/2012 9:40:01 PM PDT by kabar
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To: Think free or die
By 2019 half of the children 18 and under will be minorities as classified by the USG. Blacks and Hispanics have the highest school drop out rates. They also have the highest out of wedlock birthrates, 71% and 50% respectively. Is it any wonder that national SAT reading scores are down?

We are not the same country we were in 1972 when one in 21 was foreign born. Today it is one in 8, the highest it has been in 90 years. Demography is destiny.

19 posted on 09/24/2012 9:47:54 PM PDT by kabar
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To: Think free or die

Yep, I teach eighth graders. If I had my way - we’d spend all our time reading and getting the kids to read quickly and well.

Most have difficulty reading.


20 posted on 09/24/2012 11:45:26 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: FredZarguna
"If you have conduct issues in a parochial school, the public school must be a combat zone."

Most of the kids are refugees from the public schools, so it carries over. The school system is so short of money due to legal costs and declining enrollment that they are reluctant to expel students who probably should be expelled. It's not fair to the kids who are there to learn. There is administrative support at my school, but we are asked to work incrementally in addressing the problem children, so it will take some time to sort out some of the issues. You can be sure I'm documenting a lot of what is going on. I spend way too much time on writing up infractions and monitoring detentions when I should be teaching.

I wouldn't consider working in our urban public school system. It's not worth the risk. There aren't enough security officers (money) and the administration is notorious for not backing teachers in disciplinary matters. It's really tough for the public schools to get rid of troublemakers, and they have a boatload of them.

21 posted on 09/25/2012 2:40:08 AM PDT by Think free or die
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To: kabar
"By 2019 half of the children 18 and under will be minorities as classified by the USG. Blacks and Hispanics have the highest school drop out rates. They also have the highest out of wedlock birthrates, 71% and 50% respectively. Is it any wonder that national SAT reading scores are down? "

We have a lot of immigrant families in our school 'family'. I don't know the statistics, but many of them are from Africa, especially Eritrea lately. My experience with them is that many of the immigrant students work their backsides off, and they are seldom my troublemakers. The problems are usually with the kids whose families have lived here for generations, and who have become part of that troubled urban minority culture. The Hispanic students are a mixed bag. Most of them don't cause me trouble apart from the girls being very sociable and chatty in class. Some of them lack language skills, which may reflect not speaking English at home and among friends.

22 posted on 09/25/2012 2:45:45 AM PDT by Think free or die
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To: SeekAndFind

Nearly half were racial or ethnic minorities...


I’m shocked! How could this possibly be? I’m simply shocked I tell ya’.


23 posted on 09/25/2012 2:50:12 AM PDT by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: JCBreckenridge
"Yep, I teach eighth graders. If I had my way - we’d spend all our time reading and getting the kids to read quickly and well. Most have difficulty reading."

We're spending 3 weeks on introductory chapters in our science classes. They should take about a week. I suspect a large number of the kids will fail the chapter test on Thursday. There simply aren't enough days in the year to teach at this pace. For our next chapter, I'm considering reading the chapter aloud in class and pulling it apart as we go. Asking them to read seems fruitless for all but the honors students. They need to practice, but even with all the pre-reading exercises and supplementary worksheets, many just aren't getting it. They copy homework off their buddies at lunch, skip the reading, and think they can get by with hearing a little bit of stuff in class. It just doesn't cut it in science. I understand now why this science position has been a revolving door for years. Trying to teach the freshmen and sophomores their required science component is very challenging on every level.

24 posted on 09/25/2012 2:51:51 AM PDT by Think free or die
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To: Think free or die

Some of them lack language skills, which may reflect not speaking English at home and among friends.


If you live around them like I do you will revise your statement to read:

“Some of them lack language skills, which will reflect the fact that they ALWAYS speak Spanish at home and among friends and have no inclination to assimilate into the American society.”


25 posted on 09/25/2012 2:57:39 AM PDT by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: Think free or die

IMO poor reading and math pedagogy are sabotaging the learning of other than the top quartile of our children, who can figure things out for themselves. (A swarm of nuns teaching phonics could have given most of those kids you are seeing a sound reading foundation by the third grade.)

However, the low performance of the majority of students helps to pull down the standards and expectations for all, which contributes to a lower level of learning for nearly all students.


26 posted on 09/25/2012 3:54:18 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: SeekAndFind
I've heard that at least twice in the past that SAT scores have arbitrarily been raised across the board so as to obscure the fact that the government education system is failing.
I've hot to find confirmation of that.
27 posted on 09/25/2012 4:10:35 AM PDT by Amagi (Chief Justice John Roberts is a traitorous weasel.)
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To: napscoordinator

The writing portion is an entirely new section, separate from reading. We used to have math and reading. Now it is math, reading and writing with a possible score of 2400.


28 posted on 09/25/2012 5:10:13 AM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
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To: Rembrandt

At my house we call that the “change game”. My kids and I get a kick out of it. My wife thinks we are mean.


29 posted on 09/25/2012 5:17:02 AM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
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To: SeekAndFind

Sat scores lowest since 1972, teachers’ salaries to follow accordingly. (Not!)


30 posted on 09/25/2012 5:49:40 AM PDT by ThePatriotsFlag
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To: SeekAndFind

Sat scores lowest since 1972, teachers’ salaries to follow accordingly. (Not!)


31 posted on 09/25/2012 5:49:40 AM PDT by ThePatriotsFlag
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To: ThePatriotsFlag

RE: teachers’ salaries to follow accordingly. (Not!)

In America, Teacher’s salaries rise in INVERSE proportion to test scores (and the latter seldom go up).


32 posted on 09/25/2012 5:55:41 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
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To: jwalsh07

“Normed”, eh?

“Idiocracy”, here we come.

Seriously, though, the dumbing down is intentional, but don’t forget the training of “elites”.

Those kids that “stand out” from the crowd will be selected for special indoctrination in elitist thinking and will actually be educated to be part of the power structure.


33 posted on 09/25/2012 5:56:05 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: Think free or die
Anecdotal information is not indicative of what is happening in this country. The nation’s immigrant population (legal and illegal) reached 40 million in 2010, the highest number in our history. The U.S. immigrant population has doubled since 1990, nearly tripled since 1980, and quadrupled since 1970, when it stood at 9.7 million. Of the 40 million immigrants in the country in 2010, 13.9 million arrived in 2000 or later making it the highest decade of immigration in American history, even though there was a net loss of jobs during the decade. Growth in the immigrant population has primarily been driven by high levels of legal immigration. Roughly three-fourths of immigrants in the country are here legally. With nearly 12 million immigrants, Mexico was by far the top immigrant-sending country, accounting for 29 percent of all immigrants and 29 percent of growth in the immigrant population from 2000 to 2010.

We are creating a permanent underclass in this country primarily populated by blacks and Hispanics. And they just happen to be the fast growing segment of the population. US competitiveness in the global economy will continue to decline and we have a growing dependence upon government. 57% of immigrant headed households with children are on at least one major welfare program.

34 posted on 09/25/2012 7:18:45 AM PDT by kabar
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To: napscoordinator

In the local school district, all kids have to take the SATs. All of them.

if this is common practice, then no wonder the scores are in the toilet.

The SATs need to be reserved for likly four-year college applicants.

When I was young only the kids with college aspirations took it.

Comparing apples and oranges.

I wonder why the Education Establishment are doing this?

Perhaps to make the SAT useless.


35 posted on 09/25/2012 7:26:41 AM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Think free or die

Sit down - invest the time if you can get it done - see if you can’t have the folks that need help start earlier or late.

Otherwise it just ends up having to be the college students who flunk out that you spend time teaching reading. I did that for years. At least I’m a history teacher and I can justify it.

If you spend a month on nothing but reading - the kids will end up progressing faster once they get over the hump. Please trust me on this.


36 posted on 09/25/2012 11:58:00 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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To: JCBreckenridge
"If you spend a month on nothing but reading - the kids will end up progressing faster once they get over the hump. Please trust me on this."

I'm already planning on beefing up the literacy side of my lessons. I can't skip science for a month, but I will look at some ways to help them with their science reading. I'm coaching them on how to read a textbook, using the headings, drilling vocab, etc. I can see I'll need to do more of that, as well as spending more time on reviewing homework. There is a lot that they just don't understand.

I ask for student volunteers to read aloud when we have a class prayer before every lesson. It gives me insight into their reading levels. Very sad in many cases.

37 posted on 09/25/2012 4:38:18 PM PDT by Think free or die
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To: SeekAndFind

And that’s even taking into consideration the dumbing-down of the SAT tests over the last couple of decades. How stupid are the kids?


38 posted on 09/25/2012 4:51:11 PM PDT by MayflowerMadam
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To: SeekAndFind

The dumb downing of America’s school kids is working!!! Soon, a brand new level of stupid, hands stuck out. 47% my hip pockets. It will be 75% by the time these kids grow up. But, then again, by then, America will be a third world nation. Uganda will be richer than the USA.


39 posted on 09/25/2012 4:59:53 PM PDT by RetiredArmy (The Scriptures clearly tell us we are in the last days, the end times. Christ is the only answer!)
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To: Think free or die

I teach history and I’ve tutored Chemistry, Physics, Math, Biology, etc.

I spend most of my time drilling vocabulary and teaching my students Greek and Latin. That’s what they used to do for scientists back in the day. Far from it being a ‘dead’ or ‘useless’ language - you can’t really understand science without being able to break down the terms.

I have some materials if you want/need some help with this. Good luck. Keep fighting the good fight. I had quite a few skeptical parents my first year - but after the end of the year - I had enough converts that they’ve left me alone since.


40 posted on 09/25/2012 8:18:07 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
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