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Britishisms and the Britishisation of American English
BBC News ^ | 27th September 2012 | Cordelia Hebblethwaite

Posted on 09/27/2012 5:23:43 AM PDT by the scotsman

'There is little that irks British defenders of the English language more than Americanisms, which they see creeping insidiously into newspaper columns and everyday conversation.

But bit by bit British English is invading America too.'

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS:
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1 posted on 09/27/2012 5:23:45 AM PDT by the scotsman
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To: the scotsman

I watch BBC America all the time.


2 posted on 09/27/2012 5:28:14 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: the scotsman

My favorites are “bender” and “sod off.”


3 posted on 09/27/2012 5:31:49 AM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (Laws against sodomy are honored in the breech.)
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To: the scotsman

I sometimes hear the word “gormless” in British TV and movies, but I have yet to meet anyone who knows what “gorm” is.


4 posted on 09/27/2012 5:43:49 AM PDT by jimtorr
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To: the scotsman

I cringe when I hear “went missing” yech


5 posted on 09/27/2012 5:45:46 AM PDT by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: the scotsman

I always liked “Going pear shaped” for something that’s turning out disastrously.


6 posted on 09/27/2012 5:46:53 AM PDT by Strategerist
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To: the scotsman

We’ve been using Britishisms since Sean Connery became 007. We thought it would help when chatting up the birds. It didn’t.


7 posted on 09/27/2012 5:47:10 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: the scotsman
But bit by bit British English is invading America too

Guilty as charged!

My personal favorites are bloody and wanker.

As in: Obama is a bloody socialist wanker!

8 posted on 09/27/2012 5:48:56 AM PDT by MamaTexan (I am a Person as Created by the Laws of Nature, not a person as created by the laws of Man)
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To: the scotsman
Our entire frigging language is a “Britishism” :)

I don't see the point of complaining about a few new words.

After all, we could have all been speaking German.. if a few things had turned out different (as the myth goes)

However, I will agree on this: “Bespoke” is unbearably pretentious

9 posted on 09/27/2012 5:50:34 AM PDT by SoftwareEngineer
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To: MamaTexan
As in: Obama is a bloody socialist wanker!

Oh, I say. Jolly good old thing. Carry on.

10 posted on 09/27/2012 5:50:41 AM PDT by N. Theknow (Kennedys=Can't drive, can't ski, can't fly, can't skipper a boat, but they know what's best for you.)
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To: SoothingDave

Brilliant ping.


11 posted on 09/27/2012 5:51:01 AM PDT by secret garden (Why procrastinate when you can perendinate?)
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To: the scotsman

This thread has me chuffed.


12 posted on 09/27/2012 5:52:29 AM PDT by Disambiguator
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To: the scotsman

I try and use the words “chancer” and “likely lad” every chance I get.


13 posted on 09/27/2012 5:57:27 AM PDT by PGR88
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To: the scotsman

Meh, the Brits need to stop getting their knickers in a twist over the Americanization of britishisms...
British English is hugely influenced by FRENCH, thanks to William the Conqueror...so it’s the French who should be pissed...


14 posted on 09/27/2012 5:58:42 AM PDT by matginzac
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To: matginzac

another one is “told him off”


15 posted on 09/27/2012 6:00:40 AM PDT by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: Strategerist
I've always been partial to the British version of"you're pulling My leg" which is a look of disbelief followed by "pull the other one!"

CC

16 posted on 09/27/2012 6:06:32 AM PDT by Celtic Conservative (Q: how did you find America? A: turn left at Greenland)
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To: the scotsman

A British friend of mine once used the expression “I’m going to take a whiz around”. I had to explain that it had quite a different meaning in this country.


17 posted on 09/27/2012 6:08:33 AM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: the scotsman
Years ago I was in a pub somewhere in the Midlands and an enchanting redheaded lass came in. She was just chattering away. After a few moments I realized every other word coming out of her mouth was a curse word. Somehow it didn't sound as vulgar with a British accent.

I have several Brits that work in my office. When they speak they seem to get extra credit. It's seems that their accent gives them an automatic increase of 10 points in their IQ. When we Southerners speak people automatically take away 10 points.

18 posted on 09/27/2012 6:12:07 AM PDT by Gamecock (We don't come to Christ to be born again; rather, we are born again in order to come to Christ. RCS)
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To: yldstrk

Yep...our cousins across the pond do have some great phrases...
How about “I’m fagged...”!?


19 posted on 09/27/2012 6:17:43 AM PDT by matginzac
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To: Gamecock

not in my book, I can’t stand the British accent, it seems vainglorious to my ear, I would way rather hear a southern accent


20 posted on 09/27/2012 6:17:51 AM PDT by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: the scotsman

Bloody Hell!


21 posted on 09/27/2012 6:19:03 AM PDT by AFreeBird
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To: the scotsman; cripplecreek
Since my mother is from England, I have been speaking British phrases before they were cool!

Such as:

Bloody Hell, Sod Off!

Do not paint the toilet that colour! It will clash with the colour of the lift outside!

22 posted on 09/27/2012 6:19:23 AM PDT by KC_Lion ( Wherever I find myself standing, I forever stand with Israel.)
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To: cripplecreek

I definitely use Britishisms. We get a lot of English tv as they get American tv and it’s only natural that the language expands. Most of my English friends don’t even notice when I use a “Britishism” so I’m not sure why this professor is getting all upset.


23 posted on 09/27/2012 6:21:34 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: KC_Lion

My great-grandfather was a soldier in the British army. He brought the word “bloody” and “ducks” (or “duckie”) to the family about a 100 years ago. We are still use them.


24 posted on 09/27/2012 6:23:21 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: N. Theknow
Oh, I say. Jolly good old thing. Carry on.

See? I don't even mind being called an 'old thing' as long as it's done with a British accent!

(Um...you did use a British accent, didn't you?)

LOL!

25 posted on 09/27/2012 6:24:47 AM PDT by MamaTexan (I am a Person as Created by the Laws of Nature, not a person as created by the laws of Man)
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To: the scotsman

I’m gobsmacked and knackered.


26 posted on 09/27/2012 6:25:17 AM PDT by Natufian (t)
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To: KC_Lion

I’ve owned several Limey bikes.
Does that count ?


27 posted on 09/27/2012 6:26:24 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: the scotsman

What wanker wrote this?


28 posted on 09/27/2012 6:26:41 AM PDT by dfwgator (I'm voting for Ryan and that other guy.)
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To: Gamecock

One thing I’ve learned here in NYC, Gamecock: be very careful when you hear a “refined” British accent. English con men are all over this city using that accent to swindle provincial New Yorkers out of their lives. I know of about 4 personally. I hear that accent and I want their birth certificates and arrest record before I even talk to them!


29 posted on 09/27/2012 6:26:41 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: Gamecock

And how many times has the English woman in the office been asked to record the company’s off-hours phone message?

Southerners probably don’t many such requests.


30 posted on 09/27/2012 6:29:04 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Strategerist

I love “pear-shaped.” I don’t use it myself but it really sums up a lousy situation perfectly.


31 posted on 09/27/2012 6:29:19 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: MamaTexan

“Bloody” is a lot worse in British, than it is in American...


32 posted on 09/27/2012 6:29:41 AM PDT by Little Ray (AGAINST Obama in the General.)
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To: Gamecock
It's seems that their accent gives them an automatic increase of 10 points in their IQ. When we Southerners speak people automatically take away 10 points.

Some folks can pull of the southern accent thing. I'm from CT so I think I am a decent judge of how Yankees perceive the southern dialect.

Barry Farber can pull it off.

Haley Barbour cannot.

Bill Clinton can pull it off (unfortunately).

Zell Miller cannot.

James Carville is in his own universe.
33 posted on 09/27/2012 6:32:46 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana ("I have a new zest for life!"--Calvin from Las Vegas)
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To: the scotsman

This article is spot on!


34 posted on 09/27/2012 6:34:25 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: the scotsman
Two Countries separated by a “Common Language”...
35 posted on 09/27/2012 6:34:45 AM PDT by ThomasPaine2000 (Peace without freedom is tyranny.)
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To: KC_Lion

Top Gear is a great source of British insults.

On the other hand, they use a fair number of American insults.


36 posted on 09/27/2012 6:35:19 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: the scotsman

Remember that British cooking show “Two Fat Ladies” or something?

They were simmering some onions, but they called it “suffering.” I kind of dug that — I bet if I was sitting in a hot pan of butter, I’d be suffering too.

Regards,


37 posted on 09/27/2012 6:35:49 AM PDT by VermiciousKnid (Sic narro nos totus!)
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To: Dr. Sivana

Haley Barbour’s accent even makes Southerners cringe.


38 posted on 09/27/2012 6:38:30 AM PDT by A. Patriot (Re-electing Obama is like the Titanic backing up to hit the iceberg again.)
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To: VermiciousKnid

I never heard “suffering” although I was a fan of the 2 Fat Ladies. I have heard “sweating” onions but we use that here in the good ole USA.


39 posted on 09/27/2012 6:39:32 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
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To: the scotsman

Instead of saying something is expensive I hear people say it is “pricey”. Where did that come from?


40 posted on 09/27/2012 6:40:44 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: miss marmelstein

Nope, it wasn’t sweating -— I’ve heard and used that one for years. However, I DID only hear the “suffering” thing just the once, but it was enough to stick in my mind.

Regards,


41 posted on 09/27/2012 6:42:05 AM PDT by VermiciousKnid (Sic narro nos totus!)
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To: the scotsman

My favorite...I mean favoUrite Brittishism is “dodgy”, particularly when talking about a person. It expresses a vague, but strong feeling that something is not quite right about an individual better than any “American” word.


42 posted on 09/27/2012 6:42:29 AM PDT by Above My Pay Grade
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To: the scotsman
Good thread .. end of !


(but behave in here .. you're surrounded by armed bastards !)

43 posted on 09/27/2012 6:44:41 AM PDT by tomkat
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To: MamaTexan

“What the Bloody Hell?!” has become my recent favorite expletive. And I frequently tell our annoying dog to “bugger off!”


44 posted on 09/27/2012 6:49:20 AM PDT by reegs
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To: Disambiguator

Not me! It has me ticked off!

Where did that come from? :]


45 posted on 09/27/2012 6:49:26 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: secret garden

I’ve been using “brilliant” so long, I don’t even consider the British influence any longer!


46 posted on 09/27/2012 6:50:33 AM PDT by reegs
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To: the scotsman

I hearing a lot more “Spot on!”lately. I think it is an Anglicism, with Americans in recent decades preferring “exactly right” or “dead on.” I have in the last few years heard a few (not many) Americans use “queue” instead of “wait in line.”


47 posted on 09/27/2012 6:51:23 AM PDT by untenured
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To: the scotsman
“Gone Bodmin” from Doc Martin is my favorite. I also rather liked the show “Wisdom,” but it was canceled.
48 posted on 09/27/2012 6:51:50 AM PDT by Excellence (9/11 was an act of faith.)
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To: KC_Lion

My husband’s mother was British, and he also spent part of his childhood in England. One word he says that drives me crazy is ‘drawings’, referring to his artwork, but he pronounces it: drawERings.


49 posted on 09/27/2012 6:53:44 AM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: the scotsman
Just remembered something Mr Ditter hear all the time on the weather channel and the news stations. They use the term “hunker down”. We hate to be told we need to hunker down, where did that come from. People in Texas never said that.
50 posted on 09/27/2012 6:54:39 AM PDT by Ditter
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