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Open Season on Salt: What the Science on Hypertension Really Shows
Scientific American ^ | September 26, 2012 | Melinda Wenner Moyer

Posted on 09/27/2012 11:15:25 PM PDT by neverdem

Shedding pounds may be a better way to promote cardiovascular health than avoiding the saltshaker

The latest news reports about salt are enough to make a parent ponder a household ban on pizza and cold cuts. A study published last week in Pediatrics found that children eat, on average, 3.4 grams of sodium daily—more than twice the amount recommended for adults by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). News outlets, including the Associated Press and USA Today, explained that, according to the study, the quarter of American kids who eat the most sodium are twice to three times as likely to develop high blood pressure as the quarter who eat the least. The take-home message from these stories is clear: kids need to cut down on salt or they will suffer serious health consequences.

It's a compelling argument. Problem is, it may be wrong.

The study that these articles reference, which was published by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), did not actually find a statistically significant association between salt intake and blood pressure in kids. And the doubling or tripling of risk described by some outlets isn't an accurate portrayal of the findings either. As lead author Quanhe Yang explained to Scientific American in an interview, high salt intake doubles the odds that kids have hypertension or pre-hypertension (and again, this doubling is not statistically significant), but odds and risk are two very different things. "I am not sure the best way to convert this odds ratio into a risk ratio," Yang says, but if he had to guess, the risk would probably be lower than the odds.

Yang's study does provide compelling insights. It shows that among obese or overweight children, increased salt intake is linked to higher blood pressure, an association that is statistically significant. Scientists have long known that obesity increases hypertension risk in adults and kids, but the CDC's study suggests that being overweight might also make kids more sensitive to salt's blood-pressure-boosting effect.

Still, the kids' blood pressure changes were not huge: The overweight children who ate the most sodium—an average of about 4.6 grams per day—had an average systolic blood pressure (the top number in the blood pressure ratio) of 112.8 millimeters of mercury (mmHg), whereas those who consumed the least—an average of 2.3 grams of sodium—had an average systolic pressure of 109 mmHg. (The two groups’ average diastolic pressures, the bottom number in the ratio, were the same.) In other words, among overweight and obese kids, a doubling of sodium intake was associated with a 3 percent increase in systolic blood pressure. This difference may not be clinically significant for individuals, because "systolic blood pressure changes from minute to minute" by as much as 5 mmHg, says Michael Alderman, a professor emeritus at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and editor in chief of the American Journal of Hypertension.

An average systolic blood-pressure difference of 3 percent could, however, have consequences for overall public health. But Yang says that it's impossible to tell from his study whether eating more salt actually causes blood pressure to rise. "This is a cross-sectional study; we cannot say anything about causality," he explains. Although he and his colleagues tried to control for potentially confounding variables, it's possible that kids who eat more salt also have other habits that predispose them to high blood pressure. (For instance, research suggests that children who eat lots of salt also drink lots of soft drinks, which are associated with blood pressure increases, too.) Indeed, research doesn't always support the notion that salt causes high blood pressure: A large, multicenter study known as INTERSALT compared urinary sodium levels—an accurate indicator of prior sodium consumption—with hypertension in more than 10,000 people in 1988 and found no statistically significant association between them. In fact, the population that ate the most sodium had a lower median blood pressure than the population that ate the least.

What about the implication that kids would be better off if they simply cut back on their salt intake? Governmental organizations including the CDC and IOM advocate for population-wide salt reduction, but some researchers question the science behind these policies. "Cutting back on salt does reduce blood pressure, but it may not reduce the risk of dying early," explains Katarzyna Stolarz-Skrzypek, a cardiologist at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Poland.

In a 2011 study published in JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association, Stolarz-Skrzypek and her colleagues compared the urinary sodium levels of 3,681 people with their risk of dying over the course of eight years. They found, surprisingly, that the more sodium their subjects ate, the less likely they were to die. In particular, the death rate among those eating the least sodium was 4.1 percent, but it was only 0.8 percent among avid salt consumers.

One factor behind this strange trend is that low-salt diets do more than just lower blood pressure. "Cutting sodium can cause other physiological changes such as increased resistance to insulin, which can set the stage for diabetes and increase the risk of death from heart disease," Stolarz-Skrzypek says. "Too little sodium can also increase sympathetic nerve activity, which raises the risk of heart attacks, and boost the secretion of aldosterone, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland that is bad for the cardiovascular system." A 2011 review published by the Cochrane Collaboration, an international, independent, not-for-profit research organization funded in part by the World Health Organization, concluded that low-salt diets are associated with "increases in some hormones and lipids, which could be harmful if persistent over time."

Looked at another way, the CDC study suggests that parents of overweight and obese kids should focus on weight loss, not salt reduction. Multiple studies in both adults and children suggest that weight has a bigger effect on blood pressure than salt does, and once kids reach a healthy weight, eating too much salt may not cause problems. Plus, going from obese to an appropriate weight reduces not only blood pressure but also the risk for conditions such as cancer, depression and type 2 diabetes. Shedding pounds isn't easy, but considering that an estimated 75 percent of our sodium intake comes from store-bought processed foods rather than what is added during cooking or at the dinner table, cutting back on salt isn't either—and ultimately, doing so may not be as beneficial for us as we think it is.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; Testing
KEYWORDS: diabetes; hypertension; salt; type2diabetes
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1 posted on 09/27/2012 11:15:31 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: austinmark; FreedomCalls; IslandJeff; JRochelle; MarMema; Txsleuth; Newtoidaho; texas booster; ...
FReepmail me if you want on or off the diabetes ping list.
2 posted on 09/27/2012 11:20:40 PM PDT by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem

Just wow. Thanks for posting this!!


3 posted on 09/27/2012 11:28:59 PM PDT by MarMema (eh.)
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To: neverdem

These people don’t realize that kids need a lot if they expect them to be strong and sharp-minded.

I’m sure my refusal to eat vegetables when I was a kid affected my development.


4 posted on 09/27/2012 11:31:48 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: neverdem
The real problem is not "salt" but chemical salt, 99% sodium chloride. The Creator's salt (from the sea) is 85% sodium chloride and 15% of a full compliment of minerals. Those other mineral are needed for the body to handle the intake of sodium chloride properly. When those other minerals are stripped out of the Creator's salt, trouble starts. This is true for so many things. Caffeine is a good example. If you take pure caffeine from a pill, it can be bad, but if you use caffeine from coffee, there are many other "things" in the coffee that prevent the caffeine from be harmful if in it's pure form.

So, if you like salt, use natural sea salt and don't worry about it.

As always, when man screws around with what the Creator has created, bad "stuff" happens.

5 posted on 09/27/2012 11:41:50 PM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: MrDem

Could you elaborate on caffeine and coffee?


6 posted on 09/27/2012 11:44:59 PM PDT by wastedyears (The First Law of Heavy Metal: Not all metal is satanic.)
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To: neverdem
Cutting back on sodium would require cutting back on processed foods and greater concern with the diet. Obviously keeping the blood pressure at a reasonable level is only part of good health.
7 posted on 09/27/2012 11:55:12 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: neverdem

BOOKbump


8 posted on 09/27/2012 11:55:39 PM PDT by S.O.S121.500 (That Kenyan muzzy bastard is not my president. ENFORCE the Bill of Rights.)
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To: MrDem

“Creator’s” salt. Now that’s funny.


9 posted on 09/27/2012 11:58:17 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Whatever a homosexual union might be or represent, it is not physically marital. - F.Cardinal George)
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To: wastedyears
Read this:

"Although organic coffee as a whole food may be therapeutic, caffeine in isolation can be quite toxic. The natural blend of polyphenol antioxidants (including chlorogenic acids), bioflavonoids, vitamins and minerals in coffee beans all work together to help neutralize the harsher effects of the caffeine2. There are literally thousands of different natural chemical compounds in your brew, and science now suggests the synergy between them can pack a nice nutritional punch. With all of these compounds, you might wonder if there are any that have undesirable health effects. Yes, there are. But as I mentioned earlier, these are more concerning if ingested in isolation, as opposed to being consumed as part of the whole food."

Mounting Evidence Suggests Coffee May Actually Have Therapeutic Health Benefits

And this: Royal Society of Chemistry - Chemistry in every cup"

10 posted on 09/28/2012 12:01:01 AM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: neverdem
Shedding pounds may be a better way to promote cardiovascular health than avoiding the saltshaker

And, once again, health science has boiled down to:

"lose some weight, lardo!"

11 posted on 09/28/2012 12:04:34 AM PDT by verum ago (Note to self: check the date, stupid!)
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To: Jeff Chandler

Well you can call it the Earth Mother’s salt then... :)


12 posted on 09/28/2012 12:04:50 AM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: MarMema; wastedyears; MrDem; All
Dietary sodium intake and cardiovascular mortality: controversy resolved?

I searched "sodium intake" and "insulin resistance" at PubMed. Note the links in the right sidebar, although I haven't checked them. I just had to get some confirmation of the insulin resistance claim.

13 posted on 09/28/2012 12:06:59 AM PDT by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem

A little bit of salt is fine, and in fact necessary. Too much salt is deadly. Shake that shaker more than 3 or 4 times on a plate, have a happy heart attack. Dear old Dad had to be paddle-shocked back to life at the age of 53, and he always said it was his heavy use of the salt shaker throughout his life that really messed up his heart. He changed a lot of eating habits and lived well for another 20 years but then slowed down quite a bit his last few.


14 posted on 09/28/2012 12:08:06 AM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: MrDem

That’s a great post right there.

One thing that always cracked me up was how bread companies use bleached flour (ie., flour with all the nutrients bleached out) and then fortify the bread by adding back the vitamins! I always check the label for “unbleached flour”.


15 posted on 09/28/2012 12:13:19 AM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard
A little bit of salt is fine, and in fact necessary. Too much salt is deadly.

It sounds like drinking alcohol. Both abstainers and heavy drinkers have shorter lives on average. It's what they mean when they write J or U shaped mortality curves. Check the link in comment# 13.

16 posted on 09/28/2012 12:22:19 AM PDT by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: Lancey Howard
A little bit of salt is fine, and in fact necessary. Too much salt is deadly.

But once again, you are talking about pure sodium cloride and not real salt in it's natural form. That is like saying "a little bread is ok but a lot of bread is bad", without making any distinction because nutritionally dead and harmful Wonder bread and a full bodied, healthy whole grain bread.

17 posted on 09/28/2012 12:34:49 AM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: MrDem

Precisely my point.


18 posted on 09/28/2012 12:38:53 AM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: neverdem

Very interesting.
My doctor has said, use all the salt you want, just use the purest form.
She likes sea salt.


19 posted on 09/28/2012 12:45:38 AM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: neverdem

Salt improves the flavor of food. Better flavor results in eating more. Eating more equals weight gain.


20 posted on 09/28/2012 12:48:34 AM PDT by monocle
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To: neverdem

Salt improves the flavor of food. Better flavor results in eating more. Eating more equals weight gain.


21 posted on 09/28/2012 12:48:42 AM PDT by monocle
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To: neverdem; Hardraade

Thanks, neverdem. I don’t have diabetes myself, but my best friend does. I am trying to learn as much about it as I can. Please sdd me to your list.


22 posted on 09/28/2012 12:49:03 AM PDT by MestaMachine (obama kills and bo stinks)
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um. add


23 posted on 09/28/2012 12:49:57 AM PDT by MestaMachine (obama kills and bo stinks)
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To: neverdem

I’ll be 63 this November; 5’ 11” tall, 178 lbs and have had the same weight + or - 5 lbs for the last 15 to 20 years. Don’t exercise, don’t jog, don’t do any of that pointless, idiot blood producing crap. Do work pretty hard every day at something constructive. Walk a lot every day, job required it when I was working and now the farm requires it in retirement. Eat enough to get by, never pig out, don’t see the point in it. Love my salt and probably use a lot more than most folks, I am the guy that puts more salt on salted peanuts and salts his salad. I think the secret to staying healthy is keeping busy, use your mind and body every day, at my age some things take a bit longer (more brain, less brute force)but the work still gets done to my satisfaction.
Haven’t seen a Dr. in about 30 years and feel damn good.


24 posted on 09/28/2012 1:13:15 AM PDT by 5th MEB (Progressives in the open; --- FIRE FOR EFFECT!!)
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To: MrDem

I agree with you on salt, but ironically bread is the reverse of what you said. Bread, grains, most especially wheat, have far more anti-nutrients than nutrients, and nothing in them that can’t be gotten from healthier foods. So eating a whole wheat bread is actually dangerous to your immune system, digestive system, everything as the toxins do leak into the bloodstream from the gut. And the white dead wonder style bread? It has LESS ANTINUTRIENTS and is really only empty starch (still contains gluten and can wreak havoc in any body). So white bread is better by being the lesser of the two evils! It really stands everything we are taught on its head.


25 posted on 09/28/2012 1:31:01 AM PDT by Yaelle
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To: Yaelle

Good point and I agree that wheat and gluten is not good. Some even say that the wheat of today has been genetically modified over the past 100 years and that is the real problem. The bread that our ancestors ate was healthy.


26 posted on 09/28/2012 2:16:18 AM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: verum ago

in reading that book Salt, sort of a history through salt, it was pointed out that in previous eras, Europeans and Americans ate FAR more salt than nowadays.

Yet...no hypertension epidemic.

It’s...not...the....salt.


27 posted on 09/28/2012 4:10:15 AM PDT by ConservativeDude
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To: neverdem

-——weight has a bigger effect on blood pressure than salt does-—

If we consider the heart as a pump and the body as pipes, the above statement seems rudimentary. As the quantity of piping increases,the total fluid friction on piping walls increases necessitating the pump to increase pressure. If the pressure remained constant, the increased friction would result in a decrease in flow rate.

The problem is mechanical and fluid dynamics.


28 posted on 09/28/2012 4:27:10 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Present failure and impending death yield irrational action))
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To: 5th MEB

that is an excellent post


29 posted on 09/28/2012 4:29:05 AM PDT by ConservativeDude
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To: neverdem

I love salt, and I eat a lot of it. My blood pressure is what would be considered normal for a person in their twenties, and I’m in my sixties.


30 posted on 09/28/2012 4:31:55 AM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: neverdem

The salt content of your blood stream is regulated by the adrenal gland not how much you ingest. If you take in excess salt it will just be excreted out until it reaches the level dictated by the adrenal gland.


31 posted on 09/28/2012 4:51:22 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Obama loved the poor so much, he created millions more.)
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To: BuffaloJack

——The salt content of your blood stream is regulated by the adrenal gland——

That sir is a very interesting statement. I would wonder if the gland regulates or attempts to regulate intake by creating a salt craving if intake is too low?

I crave salt and sometimes the craving is greater than other times. It is always greater than my wife. There seems no relation to salt intake and blood pressure in my case.


32 posted on 09/28/2012 5:02:26 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Present failure and impending death yield irrational action))
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To: bert

The adrenal gland does influence your salt cravings.


33 posted on 09/28/2012 5:05:11 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Obama loved the poor so much, he created millions more.)
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To: neverdem

It is Blacks and females that suffer the most.


34 posted on 09/28/2012 5:06:20 AM PDT by ravenwolf
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To: bert

Of course nothing is to say that the craving for salt imposed by the adrenal gland is proper. The adrenal gland might just have something wrong and it’s calling for too much.


35 posted on 09/28/2012 5:06:45 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Obama loved the poor so much, he created millions more.)
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To: MrDem
"Well you can call it the Earth Mother’s salt then... :)"

So if I eat some of the Earth Mother's poison ivy, that will be good for me too? After all, it's natural.

36 posted on 09/28/2012 5:10:16 AM PDT by HangThemHigh (Entropy's not what it used to be.)
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To: BuffaloJack

——The adrenal gland might just have something wrong ——

: )

In a self regulating mechanical system feedback loops around to tweak the various inputs. In the absence of some measurable negative effect, the input demand can reasonably be assumed to be positive tweaking of the system. That’s what I assume. You have provided me with a thought for the regulator device.

Maybe, maybe not, but it is grist for the mill


37 posted on 09/28/2012 5:15:49 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Present failure and impending death yield irrational action))
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To: bert

So, we need to eat more greasy food to lubricate the artery walls, right? Lower the friction coefficient? Then, the blood will just slide right through.


38 posted on 09/28/2012 5:16:52 AM PDT by tnlibertarian (Government's solution to everything: Less freedom.)
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To: 5th MEB

“I think the secret to staying healthy is keeping busy, use your mind and body every day”

Good advice, another way to stay healthy is to come from a long line of healthy parents, g/parents/gg/parents etc.


39 posted on 09/28/2012 5:24:10 AM PDT by Holly_P
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To: MrDem

Yep.


40 posted on 09/28/2012 5:25:54 AM PDT by EternalVigilance (If your only choice is evil, you've either died and gone to hell, or you're a Republican.)
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To: neverdem

bttt


41 posted on 09/28/2012 5:26:01 AM PDT by Scotswife
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To: tnlibertarian

Strangely believe it, when I resumed eating butter and bacon and such, my numbers improved. There might be something to what you say.

Growing older though seems to be a major factor in friction increase.


42 posted on 09/28/2012 5:37:07 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Present failure and impending death yield irrational action))
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To: HangThemHigh
So if I eat some of the Earth Mother's poison ivy, that will be good for me too? After all, it's natural.

What asinine response. Please go take a few reading comprehension courses.

43 posted on 09/28/2012 5:40:58 AM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: ConservativeDude
a history through salt, it was pointed out that in previous eras, Europeans and Americans ate FAR more salt than nowadays.

It was not today's processed salt that has all of the minerals stripped out of it.

44 posted on 09/28/2012 5:43:40 AM PDT by MrDem (Founder: Democrats for Cheney/Palin 2012)
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To: bert

Bacon and butter are okay per Atkin’s, right? Did you cut out any carbs at the same time? Since being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last year, I have been working on changing my diet, but there is just an overload of information, much of it conflicting. I’ve done pretty good by lowering my carb intake, particularly bread at night. Alas, I believe I may have had my last piece of pizza.


45 posted on 09/28/2012 5:46:25 AM PDT by tnlibertarian (Government's solution to everything: Less freedom.)
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To: tnlibertarian

yes..... decrease in carbs has made a big difference. I’m type 2 diabetic.

Decreasing carbs + exercise has produced weight loss that lowered Body Mass Index that is <30 and I feel much better. My WII chides me to set a goal of 22...... tough goal.

The nightly heart burn from carbs is also dissipated/gone.

Re: information..... there is a lot.

I took part in a diabetic drug trial with intensive attention. I went every week to report my daily blood sugar readings and have blood drawn. That process made me aware of the effect of carbs on both a macro and a micro level. It was very interesting and informative. I will never know if I had the drug or a placebo, but I had three months of fantastic free health care.


46 posted on 09/28/2012 5:59:46 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Present failure and impending death yield irrational action))
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To: Lancey Howard

I am 71 have always used salt LIBERLEY. BP 110/59. No health problems other than Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis which has nothing to do with diet or blood pressure.


47 posted on 09/28/2012 6:51:09 AM PDT by Coldwater Creek (He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadows of the Almighty Psalm 91:)
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To: MrDem

Yes, there is a lot of evidence that what we have done to wheat has made it worse for us.


48 posted on 09/28/2012 8:44:42 AM PDT by Yaelle
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To: neverdem

I have eaten loads of salt all of my life and my BP has always been on the low side. So low it was almost undetectable in my teens and 20s.


49 posted on 09/28/2012 10:34:16 AM PDT by TigersEye (dishonorabledisclosure.com - OPSEC (give them support))
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To: BuffaloJack; bert; tnlibertarian

Look up “negative feedback loop” or “negative feedback inhibition.” I can’t think of a hormone that doesn’t behave according to it.

Type 1 diabetics have lost it regarding insulin and glucose homeostasis. They require exogenous insulin.

Insulin resistance in type 2 diabetics requires more endogenous insulin or insulin sensitizing drugs for glucose homeostasis. They can get worse to the point where they require exogenous insulin.


50 posted on 09/28/2012 11:34:03 AM PDT by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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