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To: montag813
it means "of" -- like in Poland many surnames end in "ski" which makes the word an adjective. Slavic languages don't have "of", but use these endings

So Warszawski means of Warsaw for example

In the Czech and Slovak republics the 'ski' is replaced with 'ova' as in Russia

And in russia and poland there is the ending "icz" like Romanowicz which means the same

In Scotland and Ireland you have the prefix "Mac" or "Mc"

Strangely I've found that among Eastern and Central Europeans they don't have very common surnames like Smith among the English (smith of course being derived from an occupation) since they name themselves after places of origin mostly.

In Poland the commonest surname is Smith = Kowalski :), but it's not as prevalent as Smith in England.

6 posted on 10/04/2012 11:42:30 PM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Cronos

A most popular Russian surname is Kuznetsov translated as “of Smith” following your own theory.


7 posted on 10/05/2012 12:47:25 AM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: Cronos

Don’t forget the Anglo-Norman Fitz- (son of) as in Fitzgerald. (The nordic -son is too obvious to mention...)


9 posted on 10/05/2012 5:24:58 AM PDT by Moltke ("I am Dr. Sonderborg," he said, "and I don't want any nonsense.")
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