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142nd Anniversary of Gen. Lees death
Canda Free Press ^ | October 12, 2012 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 10/12/2012 11:00:08 AM PDT by BigReb555

America mourned the death of Gen. Robert E. Lee on Wednesday, October 12, 1870 and Friday, October 12th marks the 142nd anniversary of his death.

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: anniversary; confederate; dixie; union; virginia; wandl
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Every year, the Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia presents a lecture and special events commemorating the Washington College presidency of Robert E. Lee on the anniversary of his death.

On Monday, October 8, 2012, the college chapel will present a book signing beginning at 10:30 am, followed by an Address at 12:15 pm in the auditorium. A program commemorating the 142th anniversary of Lee's death will feature Jeffry D. Wert, speaking on "Lee and the Rebirth of an Army: From Seven Days to Gettysburg." See details at: http://www.wlu.edu/x56830.xml

America mourned the death of Gen. Robert E. Lee on Wednesday, October 12, 1870 and Friday, October 12th marks the 142nd anniversary of his death.

Robert E. Lee, son of Light Horse “Harry” Lee of Revolutionary War fame and Anne Hill Carter Lee, distinguished himself as an exceptional officer and combat engineer in the United States Army for 32 years and Commanded the legendary Army of Northern Virginia for the Confederacy during the War Between the States. He was also a top honored student at the United States Military Academy at West Point where he would serve as Superintendent in 1852.

General Lee died at his home at Lexington, Virginia at 9:30 AM on October 12, 1870. His last great deed came after the War Between the States when he accepted the presidency of Washington College, now Washington and Lee University. He saved the financially troubled college and helped many young people further their education. Returning home from a church meeting, Robert E. Lee sat at the supper table and was about to say grace. The general could not say a word and slumped down in his chair. It was believed that he had a stroke.

His condition seemed hopeless when a doctor told him, "General, you must make haste and get well---Traveller--- has been standing too long in his stable and needs exercise." Lee could only shake his head as he knew he would never again ride his beloved horse.

The rains and flooding were the worse of Virginia's history on the day General Lee died. On Wednesday, October 12, 1870, in the presence of his family, Lee quietly passed away.

The church bells rang as the sad news passed through Washington College, Virginia Military Institute and the town of Lexington. School Cadet's carried the remains of the old soldier to Washington Chapel where he lay in state and would be buried.

Memorial meetings were held throughout the South and as far North as New York. At Washington College in Lexington eulogies were delivered by: Reverend Pemberton, Reverend W.S. White--Stonewall Jackson's Pastor and Reverend J. William Jones. Former Confederate President Jefferson Davis brought the eulogy in Richmond, Virginia. Lee was also eulogized in Great Britain.

“Duty, then is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more; you should never wish to do less”---Robert E. Lee.

The War Between the States Sesquicentennial, 150th Anniversary, runs 2011 through 2015. The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans joins the nation in remembering this historic time in our nation’s history. See information at: http://www.150wbts.org/

Gen. Douglas MacArthur once said, “Old soldier’s don’t die; they just fade away”!

Let’s not allow the memory of our nation’s heroes to fade away!

1 posted on 10/12/2012 11:00:10 AM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

I understand your wanting to carry the torch for whatshisname, but your writing is just not that good for you to post it twice.


2 posted on 10/12/2012 11:19:37 AM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: BigReb555

Stopped by Vicksburg last week. They’re having a re-enactment in a week or so...may be this weekend. I was told the re-enactors will stay in character and at night you can go into the camps and talk with them. If I could afford it I’d take a tour of all the battlegrounds. I’ve been to a few. Shiloh is the most emotional for me.

As for mourning the death of Lee, I still mourn.


3 posted on 10/12/2012 11:22:43 AM PDT by Terry Mross
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To: BigReb555

My favorite Lee story, as told by the National Geographic:

Lee, the epitome of the image of the noble, chivalric cavalier, accepted the loss of the quest for Southern independence with extraordinary grace. With so much of the South wantonly destroyed, he, more so than the vast majority of embittered and vengeful Southerners, knew that the war ended with much more than Northern victory and reunification.

Through victory an entirely new social order was to be established that would alter the relationship between the races forever. Unlike so many other Southerners, Lee embraced the new order. After peace had been achieved through unconditional surrender, the South became a vast, heavily occupied military zone with black Union soldiers seemingly everywhere.

One Sunday at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, a well-dressed, lone black man, whom no one in the community—white or black—had ever seen before, had attended the service, sitting unnoticed in the last pew.

Just before communion was to be distributed, he rose and proudly walked down the center aisle through the middle of the church where all could see him and approached the communion rail, where he knelt. The priest and the congregation were completely aghast and in total shock.

No one knew what to do…except General Lee. He went to the communion rail and knelt beside the black man and they received communion together—and then a steady flow of other church members followed the example he had set.

After the service was over, the black man was never to be seen in Richmond again. It was as if he had been sent down from a higher place purposefully for that particular occasion.

Today, and deservingly so, Lee is honored throughout the country. Only Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln exceed him in monuments and memorials.


4 posted on 10/12/2012 11:30:54 AM PDT by Lee'sGhost (Johnny Rico picked the wrong girl!)
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To: BigReb555

God bless Robert E. Lee, a true gentleman.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xvIU6VQAWpo&feature=related


5 posted on 10/12/2012 11:40:44 AM PDT by NTHockey (Rules of engagement #1: Take no prisoners)
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To: Lee'sGhost
Nice story, although the earliest known appearance of it, from 1905, puts a rather different spin on things:
"NEGRO COMMUNED AT ST. PAUL'S CHURCH," CONFEDERATE VETERAN, 13 (AUGUST 1905): 360. "Col. T. L. Broun, of Charleston, W. Va., writes of having been present at St. Paul's Church, Richmond, Va., just after the war when a negro marched to the communion table ahead of the congregation. His account of the event is as follows:

Two months after the evacuation of Richmond business called me to Richmond for a few days, and on a Sunday morning in June, 1865, I attended St. Paul's Church. Dr. Minnegerode [sic] preached. It was communion day; and when the minister was ready to administer the holy communion, a negro in the church arose and advanced to the communion table. He was tall, well-dressed, and black. This was a great surprise and shock to the communicants and others present. Its effect upon the communicants was startling, and for several moments they retained their seats in solemn silence and did not move, being deeply chagrined at this attempt to inaugurate the "new regime" to offend and humiliate them during their most devoted Church services. Dr. Minnegerode [sic] was evidently embarrassed.

General Robert E. Lee was present, and, ignoring the action and presence of the negro, arose in his usual dignified and self-possessed manner, walked up the aisle to the chancel rail, and reverently knelt down to partake of the communion, and not far from the negro. This lofty conception of duty by Gen. Lee under such provoking and irritating circumstances had a magic effect upon the other communicants (including the writer), who went forward to the communion table.

By this action of Gen. Lee the services were conducted as if the negro had not been present. It was a grand exhibition of superiority shown by a true Christian and great soldier under the most trying and offensive circumstances."


6 posted on 10/12/2012 11:57:14 AM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("More weight!"--Giles Corey)
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To: Lee'sGhost

He ain’t being honored round these parts, (New Jersey). Happy to know he’s still dead.


7 posted on 10/12/2012 12:01:37 PM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: jmacusa

Was that necessary?


8 posted on 10/12/2012 12:04:53 PM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard
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To: BigReb555
A truly inspiring gentleman--still revered in Ohio, generations after his death. My great uncle had pictures of General Grant & General Lee on the wall of his smoking room, when I was a boy, with the huge picture of Lee the more prominent, even though Grant was from the neighboring Southern Ohio County.

Thank you for reminding us of this noble Virginian, from a family that contributed so very much to the very existence of American Independence.

William Flax

9 posted on 10/12/2012 12:12:10 PM PDT by Ohioan
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd
Is the whole article necessary? Venerating a man responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of Americans in the worst war this nation ever fought?
10 posted on 10/12/2012 12:15:58 PM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: jmacusa

Perhaps one should remember that General Lee did not start that war. Like millions of others, he was drawn into it by several factors not under their control. Like the others, Robert E. Lee was fighting for what he believed in and that was and is an acceptable endeavor for that time. In my opinion, your comment is caustic, ill advised and belligerent. That being said, I suspect that Robert E. Lee, had he heard it, would defend your right to say it and forgive you for having done so.

He, sir, was a gentleman.


11 posted on 10/12/2012 12:24:25 PM PDT by tenthirteen
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To: jmacusa
I'm with you: he was an officer of the United States, sworn to defend our country and its Constitution. Had he continued to serve the United States, the war would have ended years and hundreds of thousands of casualties earlier.

He chose to use his talents to betray his country and to prolong the death and suffering of millions. I don't mourn his death - I mourn the irreplaceable men, Northern and Southern, lost because of his treason.

12 posted on 10/12/2012 12:24:49 PM PDT by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: jmacusa
You have a very strange interpretation of history. Virginia did not seek the War; Lee did not seek the War. Lee only invaded the North, in 1962, as a tactical measure, after Virginia had been under bloody attack for many months.

You completely beg the Constitutional questions--still unresolved;--and thus which side--if either--caused the bloodshed.

General Grant, the Union General who received Lee's eventual surrender, venerated Lee even at that time--and personally interposed himself, to prevent a mean spirited plan to go after Lee, thereafter.

Your mean spirited comments do not serve any Conservative purpose, in today's very dicey times. We need to pull together to fight the current attempts to subvert what still remains of American principles in Washington.

William Flax

13 posted on 10/12/2012 12:30:44 PM PDT by Ohioan
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To: Chainmail; jmacusa

Did either of you once post under the name Reagan Man? He was the biggest Lee-hater on this board.


14 posted on 10/12/2012 12:36:04 PM PDT by Fiji Hill (Deo Vindice!)
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To: Ohioan

I thought Joshua Chamberlain accepted Lee’s surrender.


15 posted on 10/12/2012 12:36:53 PM PDT by mortal19440
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To: jmacusa
So the Civil War, and every casualty it incurred...Is Robert E. Lee's fault?

Thats simply not logical.

16 posted on 10/12/2012 12:38:51 PM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard
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To: mortal19440

Grant accepted the surrender, and returned to Lee’s Army, their personal arms. There are photos of the event in the history books.


17 posted on 10/12/2012 12:41:08 PM PDT by Ohioan
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To: Fiji Hill
Nope. Just don't respect a man who violates his oath and takes up arms against his nation.

I wouldn't call myself a "Lee hater". I just don't respect the guy and I am not inclined to venerate his memory.

18 posted on 10/12/2012 12:41:19 PM PDT by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: Chainmail

Lee WAS defending the Constitution.

Of course now we’re all slaves. How’s that working for y’all in Joisy?


19 posted on 10/12/2012 12:42:21 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Chainmail; jmacusa
Did either of you have ancestors in the civil war?

I had four, all fought for the union, one of which fought in nearly every major battle in the eastern theatre and was WIA.

And I still have no problem whatsoever honoring General Lee as a gentleman of deep conviction, faith, fortitude, and military brilliance. He did not take up arms for Virginia willy-nilly -- his decision was the result much thought and prayer. He did his duty according to his own conscience, and nothing less.

20 posted on 10/12/2012 12:47:42 PM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard
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