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30 more Britishisms used by Americans
BBC News ^ | 17th October 2012 | BBC News

Posted on 10/17/2012 3:54:15 AM PDT by the scotsman

'The Magazine's recent article about the Britishisation of American English prompted readers to respond with examples of their own - here are 30 British words and phrases that you've noticed being used in the US and Canada.'

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Canada; Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: britishisms; english; language
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1 posted on 10/17/2012 3:54:18 AM PDT by the scotsman
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To: the scotsman

‘chav’ and ‘numpty’ are 2 I haven’t heard at all


2 posted on 10/17/2012 4:00:55 AM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: the scotsman

Words travel fast across the Pond, eh wot?


3 posted on 10/17/2012 4:07:40 AM PDT by Ken H
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To: the scotsman

There is one that isn’t popular........ thank goodness.

After he was shot dead, they took Travon to hospital.


4 posted on 10/17/2012 4:16:34 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Present failure and impending death yield irrational action))
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To: bert
"To hospital" has been aroung a long time. It's used by the doctor character in the 1940's era Western film She Wore a Yellow Ribbon.
5 posted on 10/17/2012 4:23:40 AM PDT by GreenLanternCorps ("Barack Obama" is Swahili for "Jimmy Carter".)
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To: the scotsman

Sorry to take issue with ya,Scotsman (well,take issue with the BBC that is) but I can only see one or two that are used here.And being a huge,longtime,fan of Britcoms and British drama I’m more familiar with these words than are most Yanks.Most Yanks (not including Osama Obama,obviously) have great respect for Britain but that doesn’t cause us to use your words.Canadians,OTOH,use many of *our* words....”gas”...”bucks”...”soccer” among quite a few others.


6 posted on 10/17/2012 4:33:38 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Ambassador Stevens Is Dead And The Chevy Volt Is Alive)
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To: the scotsman

Its like the difference between Russian and Belarussian. Except for minor differences in spelling they are same!

Only buggers and dafts speak the Queen’s English!


7 posted on 10/17/2012 4:34:09 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: the scotsman

I’ve noticed a couple more. One that has been appearing here on FR is “spot on”. Another started being used by the media in disappearance cases a few years ago; “went missing”.


8 posted on 10/17/2012 4:35:17 AM PDT by TangoLimaSierra (To the left the truth looks like Right-Wing extremism.)
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To: Gay State Conservative

A Canadian speaks proper Queen’s English. Of course then the greatest Canadian poet is a francophone of Irish descent named Emile Nelligan. One of the poets maudit who want mad and lost his talent!


9 posted on 10/17/2012 4:37:29 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: the scotsman

For later


10 posted on 10/17/2012 4:37:48 AM PDT by Codeflier (Bush, Clinton, Bush, Obama - 4 democrat presidents in a row and counting...)
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To: the scotsman

"Rule No. 1: NO POOFTERS!"

11 posted on 10/17/2012 4:44:00 AM PDT by Old Sarge (We are officially over the precipice, we just havent struck the ground yet...)
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To: nuconvert

Both very popular (in the former case, Scots use ‘ned’ or ‘neds’) and numpty or numptie is very popular.

I use both myself.


12 posted on 10/17/2012 4:44:39 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: the scotsman

I’m off to fetch a bit of tea.


13 posted on 10/17/2012 4:47:21 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: the scotsman

Outside of movies and the occasional Monty Python show, I only recognized about 4 or 5 of these words.


14 posted on 10/17/2012 4:51:03 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Obama loved the poor so much, he created millions more.)
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To: the scotsman

Knock me up sometime, we’ll share a fag.


15 posted on 10/17/2012 4:54:16 AM PDT by Ignatz (Winner of a prestigious 1960 Y-chromosome award!)
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To: nuconvert

“chav” is actually a British term for “white trash” or urban hick.


16 posted on 10/17/2012 4:57:29 AM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish

10-15 years ago, ‘chav’ was an almost exclusively southern term. Up here in the north (Lancashire), the terms we used to describe these types were ‘scallies’ or ‘townies’, but these have generally fallen out in favour of ‘chav’


17 posted on 10/17/2012 5:05:56 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: bert

I’ll know when American language has been thoroughly anglicised when I see the term ‘burgled’ instead of ‘burglarized’. Seeing as British newspapers like ‘The Daily Mail’, ‘The Guardian’ and to a lesser extent, ‘The Daily Telegraph’ are getting increasingly popular with American readers online, I can see this happenening...


18 posted on 10/17/2012 5:09:17 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: the scotsman

I see “muppet” means stupid person. No wonder Dems insist on subsidizing them.


19 posted on 10/17/2012 5:09:24 AM PDT by all the best (`~!)
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To: the scotsman; stylecouncilor; windcliff

A bit of a sticky wicket, what? That’s dodgy.


20 posted on 10/17/2012 5:14:19 AM PDT by onedoug
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To: the scotsman

The BBC is a bunch of wankers.


21 posted on 10/17/2012 5:20:13 AM PDT by matt1234 (As Obama sowed in the Arab Spring, so he is reaping in the Arab Fall.)
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To: the scotsman
We say those words better, and they sound even better with a southern drawl.
Can they drawl? I didn't think so. /s
22 posted on 10/17/2012 5:22:46 AM PDT by MaxMax
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To: the scotsman

Muppet is one of the greatest words ever... Bugger is right behind it :-)


23 posted on 10/17/2012 5:34:13 AM PDT by Wyatt's Torch (I can explain it to you. I can't understand it for you.)
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To: the scotsman

We lived in the Caribbean when my kid was young and he started school there, lots of British ex-pats on the island, so his friends were either British or Caymanian. He still uses many British terms today and he’s a grown man.

But when we moved back to the states he was still in elementary school. On the island, and to the Brits, a “rubber” is a term for an eraser. So
I had some explaining to do when he asked the teacher if he could borrow a “rubber.”


24 posted on 10/17/2012 5:44:38 AM PDT by memyselfandi59
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To: the scotsman

I’m not sure I think this is such a great list. Some of these words I’ve always used, like frock, and I don’t think row meaning fight is really a Britishism, I’ve always heard that usage.

A word not on the list is dear, meaning expensive, my grandmother (from Ireland) always used that word. She used frock too, of course, so maybe that is why it is familiar to me.

Now, there are some words that have different meanings over here, so I don’t think these Brit usages will ever become popular.

One on the list is bum. We use bum to mean a no-good person or a vagrant. I don’t know what the brits use for those meanings.

Another Brit word that is always confusing is jumper, meaning sweater. My grandmother never used jumper for sweater, and believe me she sewed me a lot of jumpers, so it might have come up. I don’t know if that is not a term used in Ireland or if she just was careful not to use it. I still don’t know what the brits call the frocks we call jumpers.

I always use the phrase bother, as in “bother it, bother me” etc. Of course I got that from Brit books, but it fits very well in some instances when even “darn it” would be too strong.

There, I wasn’t keen on the list, but I did bang on and on about it, didn’t I?


25 posted on 10/17/2012 5:45:35 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: the scotsman

Winston Churchill: “Americans and British are one people separated only by a common language.”


26 posted on 10/17/2012 5:49:13 AM PDT by Einherjar ( Asking only workman's wages I come looking for a job But I get no offers...)
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To: the scotsman

I grew up over there and don’t see many of the words being used here very much. Perhaps gobsmacked and cheeky? “You cheeky wee brat” was a favorite at home. :)

Maybe it depends on where one lives here.


27 posted on 10/17/2012 5:55:44 AM PDT by bronxville (Margaret Sanger - “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,)
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To: memyselfandi59
...to the Brits, a “rubber” is a term for an eraser...

My late wife was Australian and, shortly after we were married and living at Fort Hood, Texas, we went to the PX to find some erasers tops for my mechanical pencils.

[I'll bet you can see where this is going, can't you?]

Anyway, I was back looking through the stationary department for them and my wife went up to the front desk to ask a sales person where they were. So, we're about a half-PX apart when I heard her calling me across the store...

"Love, the lady says that the rubbers are over by the pharmacy department ..."

Ah, the joys and surprises of the English language ...

28 posted on 10/17/2012 5:56:53 AM PDT by BlueLancer (You cannot conquer a free man. The most you can do is kill him. (R. Heinlein - "If This Goes On"))
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To: the scotsman

Born in 1935, I grew up in New England, and at that time much of the Brit lingo still prevailed.

Mud guard comes to mind for fenders. But much more my mind-housing-group cannot grab hold of at the moment.

My grandmother (died 1945) used a lot of this old English; she always called herself a Jickey (guessing at the spelling here).

She had come from Egland via Ireland...(maybe the other way round?)

Never found any explanation for “Jickey”.

Lotta storefront Fish-N-Chips around in those days, tires spelled tyres, etc. Lotta Brit actors in the films, etc.

Semper Watching!
*****


29 posted on 10/17/2012 6:28:26 AM PDT by gunnyg ("A Constitution changed from Freedom, can never be restored; Liberty, once lost, is lost forever...)
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To: goldstategop
"Only buggers and dafts speak the Queen’s English!"

HA, HA, HA!

30 posted on 10/17/2012 6:37:23 AM PDT by hummingbird (Lather, Rinse........BUT DO NOT REPEAT - REPEAT IS A WASTE - A SCAM!)
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To: the scotsman
I have been hearing bespoke.
31 posted on 10/17/2012 6:42:39 AM PDT by gasport
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To: Daveinyork
"I’m off to fetch a bit of tea."

In some southern states (sic?), that would be kind of like saying:

"I'm fixin' to get me some ice tea." (of course, that is the informal)

Ha!

ice tea sometimes pronounced "ahs tay"

32 posted on 10/17/2012 6:43:15 AM PDT by hummingbird (Lather, Rinse........BUT DO NOT REPEAT - REPEAT IS A WASTE - A SCAM!)
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To: MaxMax
"We say those words better, and they sound even better with a southern drawl.

Can they drawl? I didn't think so. /s

HA, HA, HA!

Cherish the southern drawl, lest it become a dead drawl!

Cherish the Southern Belle drawl, too. You can get a lot of things using THAT drawl.

Southern Belle drawl conversations last far longer than the Queen's English conversations because the drawl really s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-s out conversations.

Y'all know what I mean...

33 posted on 10/17/2012 6:53:47 AM PDT by hummingbird (Lather, Rinse........BUT DO NOT REPEAT - REPEAT IS A WASTE - A SCAM!)
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To: Ignatz; Scotsman

>> Knock me up sometime, we’ll share a fag. <<

I used to live in a flat directly across the hall from a friendly and sincere young Englishwoman. Neither of us cared for fags. But I can assure you, I would go over and knock her up several times a week!


34 posted on 10/17/2012 7:01:20 AM PDT by Hawthorn
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To: hummingbird

That’s to keep from going round the bend and being quite barking mad.


35 posted on 10/17/2012 7:04:17 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: hummingbird; MaxMax

>> Cherish the Southern Belle drawl <<

Sorry to say that it’s dying fast. Go to almost any rural hamlet in the Deep South, and you’ll find that the teenaged girls now are trying to speak “Valleygirlese.” I predict that in 50 or 60 years, the southern accent (at least among white people) will be just about dead.


36 posted on 10/17/2012 7:08:23 AM PDT by Hawthorn
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To: jocon307

“One on the list is bum. We use bum to mean a no-good person or a vagrant. I don’t know what the brits use for those meanings.”

‘Tramp’ or ‘pikey’.


37 posted on 10/17/2012 7:16:43 AM PDT by ccmay (Too much Law; not enough Order.)
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To: Ignatz
Knock me up sometime, we’ll share a fag.

You share your own fag,pal.I'm gonna have me a cigarette.

38 posted on 10/17/2012 7:33:52 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Ambassador Stevens Is Dead And The Chevy Volt Is Alive)
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To: jocon307
One on the list is bum. We use bum to mean a no-good person or a vagrant. I don’t know what the brits use for those meanings.

"homeless person"








or "tramp"

39 posted on 10/17/2012 7:34:32 AM PDT by Oztrich Boy (Monarchy is the one system of government where power is exercised for the good of all - Aristotle)
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To: cunning_fish

“Chav” is an acronym for “Council House And Violence.” I’ve been dating a British gal for a while and she gets me rolling with her use of British slang. Two of my favorite terms are “punchup,” meaning a brawl and “earwigging,” meaning to secretly listen in on a private conversation.


40 posted on 10/17/2012 7:42:09 AM PDT by Rocco DiPippo
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To: the scotsman

I used “yob” on a forum: no one knew what I was saying.

However—when I used “yout”—most knew of it from the movies.


41 posted on 10/17/2012 8:06:23 AM PDT by Does so (....... Justice Scalia just turned 78 .........==8-O ............Dims don't think ... they PLOT!)
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To: hummingbird

I’ve lived in the South for a while, and although, as an exiled Yankee, I always say “iced tea,” around these parts the word “iced” is not really needed; it’s understood and is seldom used by the natives.

Of course, a waitresse will still ask you if you want it “sweet or unsweet, honey”.


42 posted on 10/17/2012 8:45:31 AM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: the scotsman

I’ve always thought the phrase “barking mad” was the dog’s bollocks.


43 posted on 10/17/2012 8:58:57 AM PDT by paddles ("The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates." Tacitus)
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To: the scotsman
A little story from a Scottish friend
44 posted on 10/17/2012 9:07:23 AM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: the scotsman

I thought that “bloody” was like a f-bomb.


45 posted on 10/17/2012 10:05:38 AM PDT by hummingbird (Lather, Rinse........BUT DO NOT REPEAT - REPEAT IS A WASTE - A SCAM!)
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To: the scotsman

This article is a bunch of shite. The writing is all sixes and sevens.


46 posted on 10/17/2012 10:13:52 AM PDT by dfwgator (World Series bound and picking up steam, GO GET 'EM,TIGERS!)
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To: dfwgator

Aye, pure mince, by the way.


47 posted on 10/17/2012 10:16:43 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: the scotsman

They don’t have “vet” on the list (as in “The media failed to vet Obama in 2008.”). It seems to me that term is a Britishism that only caught on in the US in recent years (maybe in the 1990s).


48 posted on 10/17/2012 12:20:59 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: the scotsman

They don’t have “vet” on the list (as in “The media failed to vet Obama in 2008.”). It seems to me that term is a Britishism that only caught on in the US in recent years (maybe in the 1990s).


49 posted on 10/17/2012 12:36:04 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: gunnyg
Re: jickey possibly a mixture of "jack" , which can mean a brit and "mickey" or "mick"which refers to the Irish? Just a guess.

CC

50 posted on 10/17/2012 4:27:27 PM PDT by Celtic Conservative (Q: how did you find America? A: turn left at Greenland)
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