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Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada
National Geographic News ^ | October 19, 2012 | Heather Pringle

Posted on 10/19/2012 6:11:45 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands

For the past 50 years—since the discovery of a thousand-year-old Viking way station in Newfoundland—archaeologists and amateur historians have combed North America's east coast searching for traces of Viking visitors.

It has been a long, fruitless quest, littered with bizarre claims and embarrassing failures. But at a conference in Canada earlier this month, archaeologist Patricia Sutherland announced new evidence that points strongly to the discovery of the second Viking outpost ever discovered in the Americas.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.nationalgeographic.com ...


TOPICS: Canada; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: archaeology; canada; godsgravesglyphs; thevikings; vikings; worldnextdoor
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1 posted on 10/19/2012 6:11:49 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands; SunkenCiv

North American Discovery ping


2 posted on 10/19/2012 6:14:14 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

These people have been trying to deny Rome’s discovery of America ever since Columbus got here.


3 posted on 10/19/2012 6:19:25 PM PDT by tsowellfan (KEEP WORKING like we are 10 POINTS DOWN!!!!)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

4 posted on 10/19/2012 6:19:55 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

“Viking” is such a racist term. I prefer Scandanvian American. < /sarc>


5 posted on 10/19/2012 6:20:31 PM PDT by Gil4 (Progressives - Trying to repeal the Law of Supply and Demand since 1848)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands
I give it 10 posts before someone posts a football helmet.
6 posted on 10/19/2012 6:22:09 PM PDT by gov_bean_ counter (ObamaCare is an assault on the unborn, infirmed and elderly. GOP, repeat this as necessary...)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Where do I sign up for reparations for the slaughter of my illegal immigrant Viking forebears by the nativists?


7 posted on 10/19/2012 6:22:16 PM PDT by RugerMini14
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Given the way vikings traveled in boats specifically designed to go far up rivers I wouldn’t be surprised if they made it well into the great lakes region.

That doesn’t mean they left a lot of evidence or even would have left much but its certainly possible. Seems that I’ve read that there are some cliff drawings in Michigan’s upper peninsula that show boats that look suspiciously like viking longboats. Again, its not evidence but its interesting to consider.


8 posted on 10/19/2012 6:22:39 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

For those interested in historical curiosities and adventure, one of my favorite books is an old one called Conquest by Man, by Paul Herrman. Although more than half a century old and out of date on many issues, it still is one of the more well-done books of its kind that I have ever read. It is not an overly sensationalized book. It simply bears out, in many cases, the saying that fact can be stranger than fiction. It has interesting information on the Vikings (e.g., that the Roman Catholic Church recognized a bishop of Greenland in the 11th century, long before Columbus) and numerous other topics, such as the Egyptians traversing the Cape of Good Hope in the 6th century B.C., 2000 years prior to Bartholomew Diaz (in 1488). Still more than worth a read in spite of its age.


9 posted on 10/19/2012 6:24:46 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands (Mitt Romney is a handbasket driver. I refuse to ride.)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Bookmark!


10 posted on 10/19/2012 6:27:52 PM PDT by corlorde (forWARD of the state)
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To: JoeProBono

damn Danes! Always causing trouble.


11 posted on 10/19/2012 6:30:02 PM PDT by Lockbar (Romney's job on day one: Shut down all the Obama Phones)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands
e.g., that the Roman Catholic Church recognized a bishop of Greenland in the 11th century, long before Columbus.

I believe that would be St Brendan.
12 posted on 10/19/2012 6:31:09 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

It’s a little known fact that the Vikings were some of the best glass blowers in the world. The best way to validate this spot as Viking is to look for small, glass figurines of seals, moose and elephants.


13 posted on 10/19/2012 6:31:27 PM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Voyage of St Brendan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brendan


14 posted on 10/19/2012 6:32:53 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Bk mk


15 posted on 10/19/2012 6:34:26 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Ignorance is bliss- I'm stoked)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Yep, there was a bishop in Gardar.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gar%C3%B0ar,_Greenland

There is an intriguing mention of Erik, the bishop of Gardar, sailing to Vinland in 1121, but nothing more was ever heard from him.


16 posted on 10/19/2012 6:40:23 PM PDT by Claud
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To: cripplecreek; blam
Given the way vikings traveled in boats specifically designed to go far up rivers I wouldn’t be surprised if they made it well into the great lakes region.

There is some compelling evidence that the so-called Kensington Runestone in Minnesota represents what was almost the deepest incursion into North America by Viking explorers.

Associated with this find are some sites in Lake Winnipeg which these explorers would've traversed (via Hudson's Bay, Churchill River, Lake Winnipeg, thence the Red River into Dakota/Minnesota country). Plus, we are presented with a genetic source for tyhe blonde hair and blue eyes that Lewis & Clark found in the Mandan tribe.

I've pinged blam to the thread since he authored an extensive thread on the Kensington Runestone here on FR and could post a link for us.

Moreover, I discovered a striking image of a Viking longship, complete with extended prow, square sail and a row of oars, with round shields mounted along the deck rails at Three Rivers Petroglyphs near Tularosa, NM back in 1966.

I'm not saying the Vikings ever got there...but stories about their boats certainly did.

17 posted on 10/19/2012 6:41:05 PM PDT by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA; Ignorance on parade.)
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To: cripplecreek
I believe that would be St Brendan.

Actually that is an interesting, but different and earlier story clouded in mystery and may or may not have anything to do with Greenland. I typed hastily, but the first recognized bishop of Greenland, Arnald, appears to be from the early twelfth century (1124 A.D.). What I thought especially interesting, if I remember vague memories, is that the Roman Catholic Church in Rome was aware of his presence in Greenland at this time.
18 posted on 10/19/2012 6:41:18 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands (Mitt Romney is a handbasket driver. I refuse to ride.)
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To: Gil4

Please call me a Berserker American. Or else.


19 posted on 10/19/2012 6:42:56 PM PDT by DManA
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To: okie01

Yeah, I think there was far more traveling going on but not a lot of written history being kept. Written history and record keeping was mostly a southern European thing.

Look how the tribes spread all across the vast south pacific to places as far away as Hawaii and Easter Island.


20 posted on 10/19/2012 6:52:16 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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Comment #21 Removed by Moderator

To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Who was the coach?


22 posted on 10/19/2012 6:52:56 PM PDT by beethovenfan (If Islam is the solution, the "problem" must be freedom.)
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To: DManA

Way cool.


23 posted on 10/19/2012 6:53:54 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: cripplecreek
There are actually large stones scattered around the country (in a rather uniform pattern) that bear runic letters.

If you try to read them in medieval Norwegian they come up with bizarre tales. If, on the other hand, you read them in 1600s Gothic (Swedish) they reveal themselves to be survey marks on the order of BENCHMARKs.

The reason they are written in a runic alphabet is the surveyors were from Sweden, and they were employed by Spain.

Due to a severe plague in the 1400/1500 period most of the folks in Sweden who could write in runic alphabets were killed leaving few teachers for students in the late 1500/1600 period. Consequently, the runic forms are not up to the standards of the that time frame and are easily mistaken for older forms used in the 1100/1200 period.

The furthest North this survey went was 55 degrees.

The greater part of the survey lines obviously match the descriptions given in the Treaty of London(1604)

Later surveys follow these lines to an uncanny degree, although there are variations in meridians inasmuch as it wasn't until the late 1700s that they could be surveyed with precision in untracked wilderness.

I think there are signs of some EARLIER surveys done to provide a couple of parallels and 3 meridians ~ with landmarks ~ just for basic orienteering for folks seeking to identify potentially profitable places to create internal colonization.

Most of the stones are worked only a little ~ the surveyors used native stone that coincided pretty much with the standard boundary marker stones used in Spain at the time. Some of the benchmarks are HUGE though.

It's probably worth discovering all of them to protect them from further depredation ~ the one in Kensington, Minnesota was actually dug up and put in a local museum.

The Norse never made it that far.

24 posted on 10/19/2012 6:55:12 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

So what’s Viking word for America


25 posted on 10/19/2012 7:06:10 PM PDT by Flavius (What hopes for victory, Gaius Crastinus? What grounds for encouragement ?)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

What’s in your wallet?


26 posted on 10/19/2012 7:06:50 PM PDT by kaehurowing
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To: Gil4

It’s obvious scandannavians were here. Look at a map.

What amazes me is that the Great North is basically uninhabited. Similar latitude to scandanavia but of course no warming gulf stream.

Even so beautiful if brutal part of the world.


27 posted on 10/19/2012 7:18:04 PM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt the Constitution together as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: Gil4

It’s obvious scandannavians were here. Look at a map.

What amazes me is that the Great North is basically uninhabited. Similar latitude to scandanavia but of course no warming gulf stream.

Even so beautiful if brutal part of the world.


28 posted on 10/19/2012 7:18:04 PM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt the Constitution together as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: afraidfortherepublic; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ..

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks afraidfortherepublic.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


29 posted on 10/19/2012 7:27:40 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands; All

WOW!

I have been to the Viking site at L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, and seen the work they have done with the research and excavation there. Really interesting...worth the very long trip!

So...I am really geeked up over this discovery!

I would not be surprised that the Vikings also had encampments and settlements in other places around North America

Also, there was a program I saw a few months ago on History Channel, in which they were discussing the possibility of Viking settlers making their way as far as the Mississippi River...there is evidence that the Indians met Vikings thru some of the oral histories provided by the various tribes....reporting seeing “white men” about 1000 years ago.

More and more, I believe we will find that Vikings and Norsemen were in North America in much larger numbers than believed.

With today’s “Political Correctness” with Columbus and the New World...and how Mestizo/Mulatto/Indigenous peoples blame Columbus for their “misery, racism, and other problems”...wonder if they would be so willing to accept the Vikings as the first Europeans...or will their Spanish ethno-centricity be more welcoming of Columbus discovering the “New World”?


30 posted on 10/19/2012 7:30:46 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Political maturity is realizing that the "R" next to someone's name does not mean "conservative")
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To: Lockbar

damn Danes! Always causing trouble


LOL...actually these Vikings from this article most likely came from Norway...as the settlers in Iceland and Greenland (where the Viking explorers left to go to No America) came from Norway


31 posted on 10/19/2012 7:35:16 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Political maturity is realizing that the "R" next to someone's name does not mean "conservative")
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To: cripplecreek

Yeah, I think there was far more traveling going on but not a lot of written history being kept. Written history and record keeping was mostly a southern European thing.


Great point.

At that time, the only ones who knew how to read and write were monks, nuns, and priests. Very few people outside of the church were literate...even the royalty.

So, more than likely these Viking explorers and settlers had no education, and did not record their travels as they went along....We just have the ancient Norse Sagas that were written from oral histories


32 posted on 10/19/2012 7:41:37 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Political maturity is realizing that the "R" next to someone's name does not mean "conservative")
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands
Here is a picture of a Viking church building at Hvalsey in Greenland. This one dates from the 14th century.


33 posted on 10/19/2012 7:41:48 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands (Mitt Romney is a handbasket driver. I refuse to ride.)
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To: SeminoleCounty; All

Hey...apologize for kinda repeating what another FReeper already described in better detail....about the “possibility of Vikings meeting up with natives”

My bad.

Just find the Vikings and the Nordic peoples very interesting


34 posted on 10/19/2012 7:45:51 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Political maturity is realizing that the "R" next to someone's name does not mean "conservative")
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MichaelW Travels...: Jumping by the Old Stone Mill- Newport, Rhode Island

MichaelW Travels...: Jumping by the Old Stone Mill- Newport, Rhode Island

35 posted on 10/19/2012 7:53:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

I wonder if they will ever find a sword and a battle ax in an Indian Burial mound. Or maybe a Viking sailing ship on the bottom of one of the great lakes. The Iroquois and Huron had long huts similar to the Viking long houses. Makes me wonder just how long ago the Vikings explored our continent.


36 posted on 10/19/2012 7:57:02 PM PDT by Bringbackthedraft (Who we elect is not as important as who they bring in with them.)
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To: SeminoleCounty
I personally believe that there was once a much greater population in North America than what we found when we began settling. There are some massive prehistoric earthworks in north America that weren't created by tribes with a few dozen individuals. They were created by thousands of settled people. Things like Cahokia weren't built by a few dozen hunter gatherers.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Diseases brought by much earlier visitors could explain the destruction of much larger societies just like the black death set Europe back by many years.
37 posted on 10/19/2012 7:57:29 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/heavener1.html

A Relic of Vikings in Oklahoma?


38 posted on 10/19/2012 8:00:25 PM PDT by Just mythoughts (Please help Todd Akin defeat Claire and the GOP-e send money!!!!!)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Funny posts here. On a serious note, there is strong evidence of Viking settlements in Oklahoma. I know, sounds wild. But there are some 3 or 4 sites with proven Rune writings in Oklahoma. The best known is the Heavener Rune. Stopped there a couple of weeks ago. Very interesting place.


39 posted on 10/19/2012 8:01:28 PM PDT by LukeSW (The truth shall make you free!)
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Funny posts here. On a serious note, there is strong evidence of Viking settlements in Oklahoma. I know, sounds wild. But there are some 3 or 4 sites with proven Rune writings in Oklahoma. The best known is the Heavener Rune. Stopped there a couple of weeks ago. Very interesting place.


40 posted on 10/19/2012 8:02:29 PM PDT by LukeSW (The truth shall make you free!)
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To: Flavius

un, that’s easy ~ min y sota!


41 posted on 10/19/2012 8:07:02 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: SeminoleCounty
The fellows who founded Cahokia about 800 AD drank tea made from the leaves of the only North American plant in the tea family. That's when the bow and arrow arrived in America.

So, tea drinkers with boats that could sail the ocean, sail up the Mississippi, found Cahokia, pass out bows and arrows and do that all before the first Viking dragon boat had been built.

Trick is the Vikings made permanant contact with the Sa'ami some time AFTER 800 AD ~ and it was the Sa'ami boat used in wild mountain rivers and the nearby Arctic ocean that served as the design base for the later scaled up ocean going Viking boats.

So, Chinese first, then Spaniards, then Vikings ~

42 posted on 10/19/2012 8:12:32 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands
For those interested in possible widespread Viking or other European presence in pre-Columbian America, the book that you would want is America B.C. by Barry Fell. He purports to have found inscriptions throughout the eastern U.S. I have read the book, and I simply do not agree with it. For me, it was very unconvincing and grasping at straws. I'm not convinced that there were any far-flung excursions by the Vikings into the American interior. The book cited earlier, Conquest by Man gives a much more sober and realistic assessment while still looking at some more credible possibilities.
43 posted on 10/19/2012 8:16:54 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands (Mitt Romney is a handbasket driver. I refuse to ride.)
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To: Bringbackthedraft
Real simple answer ~ The soils of North America east of the Appalachians are very acidic. Even the metal tools dropped on the ground by pioneering American immigrants in the 1600s and 1700s have mostly been corroded into rust.

Soil conditions change West of the mountains ~ and so far no metal tools.

The Spaniards had a survey operation going on the Acadia/Virginia line ~ at present day Spanish Hill Pennsylvania. They found extant armor, crucifixes, etc. and a buried boat. Some of the folks working out of there were picked up about 1612 by the Indians and shipped to New Jersy to the Dutch ~ where, of course, there were no Dutch in North America at the time. So, who were the Dutch in New Jersey? Were these proto-mandans? (/s) ~ more likely they were Spanish Netherlanders carving out fishing villages. I've found town sites for several dozen such places all around Souvr'n Jersey!

44 posted on 10/19/2012 8:20:06 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

Great thread, thanks!


45 posted on 10/19/2012 8:20:14 PM PDT by Graewoulf ((Traitor John Roberts' Obama"care" violates Sherman Anti-Trust Law, AND the U.S. Constitution.))
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To: cripplecreek
The Americas used to suffer from rather regular hanta virus epidemics. Without modern medicine you lose up to 95% of your population in short order with such an epidemic.

So, what happened to hanta virus epidemics?

Well, they didn't go away but the domesticated European housecat eats their primary vector ~ ground squirrels ~ like crazy! The last big die off in was about 1648 in Virginia and Acadia. After that it just didn't happen again on the East Coast.

46 posted on 10/19/2012 8:23:25 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: cripplecreek
"They were created by thousands of settled people. Things like Cahokia w.eren't built by a few dozen hunter gatherers."

De Soto claimed to have seen very large indian populations when he explored the Mississippi river around 1540. Those large populations were all gone when the next europeans arrived in the area years later.

47 posted on 10/19/2012 8:27:18 PM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: Just mythoughts
A Spanish survey benchmark ~ prepared from native stone by Swedish surveyors ~ probably in the 1600s some time. If read in Gothic it self identifies as a 'boundary marker'.

There are some other stones in the area. All of them are on standard meridians or lines of latitude ~ by the mid 1700s Oklahoma had numerous well surveyed Spanish towns ~ abandoned at some point ~ haven't figured that part out ~ but the Indians who moved in from Montana retained the surveys, so they knew something. Take a good look at Helena MT ~ it's laid out according to the Spanish Law of the Indies that governed new town layouts. That area was occupied by nothing but Indians for all anybody knows. Check out the Comanche Indians for some interesting stuff ~ more like Europeans than Indians ~ related to all the other major tribes in OK before we shipped in Indians from the Eastern USA

48 posted on 10/19/2012 8:29:48 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: cripplecreek

Yes, I agree there were more than just a few Vikings/Europeans pre-1492. Just from the evidence we know that there had to be a number of Vikes/Euros throughout N America

Considering that the Vikes went to areas that still today are relatively un-populated and isolated...we probably have a lot more to discover.

And, it is not easy to get to L’Anse aux Meadows today...even with internal combustion engines


49 posted on 10/19/2012 8:31:32 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Political maturity is realizing that the "R" next to someone's name does not mean "conservative")
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To: Graewoulf

:-)


50 posted on 10/19/2012 8:31:53 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands (Mitt Romney is a handbasket driver. I refuse to ride.)
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