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Sandy Sinks Tall Ship, 14 Rescued and Two Missing {Bounty}
ABC News ^ | 29 Oct 2012 | KEVIN DOLAK

Posted on 10/29/2012 9:54:02 AM PDT by shove_it

Fourteen people were rescued this morning from a tall ship that was sunk by Hurricane Sandy, but a Coast Guard helicopter is scouring the churning seas for two crew members who are missing.

The HMS Bounty, a three masted ship, was 90 miles southeast of Hatteras, N.C., when the owner called saying she'd lost contact with the crew Sunday night, The AP reported. The Bounty is a 180-foot replica of the ship featured in the film "Mutiny on the Bounty."


(Excerpt) Read more at abcnews.go.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: hmsbounty; hurricanesandy; rescue; shipwreck; uscg
Vid at link.
1 posted on 10/29/2012 9:54:03 AM PDT by shove_it
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To: shove_it

“The ship left Connecticut last week for St. Petersburg, Fla.”

Maybe it’s just me (and I’m no sailor) - but this seems like a poor time to go to sea.


2 posted on 10/29/2012 10:05:35 AM PDT by bigbob
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To: shove_it

Wattsupwiththat.com has great stuff about Sandy.
http://wattsupwiththat.com/2012/10/29/latest-super-high-resolution-image-of-hurricane-sandy/#more-73246


3 posted on 10/29/2012 10:06:50 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: bigbob; shove_it
My hubbie & I were in St Pete, late April, early May and saw this ship come into port. Our tour guide on a birding boat said that was the first time The Bounty had been to St Pete. We were on the beach for the sunrise that morning and saw it sailing across the horizon. Beautiful. I hope they got the crew count wrong & have found everyone safe.
4 posted on 10/29/2012 10:18:08 AM PDT by grame (May you know more of the love of God Almighty this day!)
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To: bigbob

Ships do not typically stay in harbor during a hurricane. Even very large ships stand out to sea when a great storm is approaching.

I was on this beautiful vessel once several years ago. It was a floating work of art, a gorgeous wooden machine. What a sorrow this would be, even had all the crew survived.

How terrible for crew to lose their lives in this way, just as they might have done 200 years ago, in the cold and terror. I can only pray for them and hope it was very quick.


5 posted on 10/29/2012 10:28:24 AM PDT by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: ottbmare

Yes, they stand out to sea (unless there is a really good harbor)but they DON’T sail into the teeth of the storm.


6 posted on 10/29/2012 10:35:21 AM PDT by NonValueAdded ("Why not eliminate the middle man and have whoever feeds Obama his lines debate Romney directly?")
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To: bigbob

This accident was avoidable. Horrible judgement to be at sea in this sailing ship with hurricane bearing down. She should have been anchored in a safe harbour and had 4 or 5 storm anchors set. They will loose the lawsuits.


7 posted on 10/29/2012 10:36:44 AM PDT by PilotDave (No, really, you just can't make this stuff up!!!)
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To: NonValueAdded

When the bilge pumps quit working you founder.....


8 posted on 10/29/2012 10:42:08 AM PDT by panzerkamphwageneinz
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To: NonValueAdded; ottbmare; PilotDave; Kenny Bunk
Just a few thoughts from a yachtsman: It seems likely that the Captain wanted to go out, but looking at the early track of the storm as they sailed south, he thought it best to pass southbound well in front of it and find a hole somewhere rather than risk being caught on the north side of it. (always it seems a bad idea, like the time I thought I could cross a shipping lane in front of a tanker - yes I did this)

I suspect also that he counted on auxiliary propulsion to "beat the storm" but that the "lost propulsion" landed them square offshore in the teeth of it.

I am almost certain that they lost electrical, too, i.e. Weatherfax, SSB, etc. which is why the parent company lost them and they may have had insufficient meteorological information.

A ship like that has a lot of resistance topsides and high freeboard, making some kind of drogue or sea-anchor warped off the bow the only option near the end... Not that big a deal, I've done it, but in this case we are dealing with a big sail even with all canvas down. The last option being, of course, to cut away the masts and rigging and pray they don't hole the boat... A practically impossible feat on a boat like that in those conditions.

Finally I imagine the ship was abandoned when the masts began to break, slip their partners or stretch their steps if that is possible, and the seams began to open up.

I also submit they are still feeling the whip of Vice Admiral William Bligh, who may never let Saint Peter look upon their sorry souls.

I now submit these armchair hypotheticals to the stinging criticism of Lord Kenny Bunk, Rear Admiral of the Ocean Seas and Highly Rated in All Conditions by Unfortunate Women in and out of Every Port.
9 posted on 10/29/2012 11:02:30 AM PDT by golux
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To: shove_it

Farewell and adieu to you, Spanish Ladies
Farewell and adieu to you, ladies of Spain;
For we’ve received orders for to sail for old England
And we may never see you fair ladies again.


10 posted on 10/29/2012 11:21:25 AM PDT by Mat_Helm
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To: shove_it

Farewell and adieu to you, Spanish Ladies
Farewell and adieu to you, ladies of Spain;
For we’ve received orders for to sail for old England
And we may never see you fair ladies again.


11 posted on 10/29/2012 11:27:54 AM PDT by Mat_Helm
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To: bigbob

The Navy sent all its ships in Norfolk out to sea a couple of days ago. Safest place to be, assuming they’ve gone far out enough.


12 posted on 10/29/2012 11:32:15 AM PDT by EDINVA (I)
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To: shove_it

Prayers out for the two missing crew.

It was a beautiful ship.


13 posted on 10/29/2012 11:39:14 AM PDT by Irish Eyes
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To: EDINVA

“Navy sent all its ships”

NOT the same thing. Modern Navy ships are able to power at 30+ knots in any direction they choose. They can get out of the way. A 150 year old sailing ship CANNOT do this. Even with auxiliary power this ship cannot power straight into a wind/sea when the winds reach probably 25knots. She had way to much wind catching rigging. It would stop her dead.


14 posted on 10/29/2012 12:31:27 PM PDT by PilotDave (No, really, you just can't make this stuff up!!!)
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To: golux

Dodging freighters is a common hazard when sailing on the Great Lakes, especially at night in Lake Huron during the Port Huron to Mackinac Island Race, particularly in the Straits of Mackinac. I recall crossing in front of a freighter so close that we surfed down her bow wave while the crew of the freighter looked over her rail to see if there were any survivors from that yacht of fools.


15 posted on 10/29/2012 2:48:25 PM PDT by shove_it ( The 0bama regime are the people Orwell and Rand warned us about.)
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To: golux

Dodging freighters is a common hazard when sailing on the Great Lakes, especially at night in Lake Huron during the Port Huron to Mackinac Island Race, particularly in the Straits of Mackinac. I recall crossing in front of a freighter so close that we surfed down her bow wave while the crew of the freighter looked over her rail to see if there were any survivors from that yacht of fools.


16 posted on 10/29/2012 2:50:06 PM PDT by shove_it ( The 0bama regime are the people Orwell and Rand warned us about.)
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To: golux; PilotDave; NonValueAdded
Their course was the logical one and based on sound seamanship considering the magnitude of the hurricane.

They were effectively sailing on the eastward side of the storm, heading south and would have successfully sailed around the southern tail of the storm had their engines and pumps not given out.

It was a calculated risk and the right one to make considering the fact that the ship would have been destroyed if it had made port anywhere along the coastline where the hurricane was the most intense...........

You can read more of their account on their facebook page at

https://www.facebook.com/HMSBounty

17 posted on 10/29/2012 4:09:22 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Jab her with a harpoon.....)
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To: Hot Tabasco; golux; PilotDave; NonValueAdded
Their course was the logical one and based on sound seamanship considering the magnitude of the hurricane.

They were effectively sailing on the eastward side of the storm, heading south

Westward side (the storm center is still 100+ miles out to sea.

Going East they would of been bucking headwinds all the way

West side with the wind was logical, but it meant sailing between the storm and C.Hatteras. Sometimes there are no good options.

18 posted on 10/29/2012 8:18:17 PM PDT by Oztrich Boy (Monarchy is the one system of government where power is exercised for the good of all - Aristotle)
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To: shove_it

Yes indeed, that is a lesson I have only had to learn once, thank goodness. When unable for whatever reason to determine a good relative bearing never again have I thought: “...Well, it sure doesn’t SEEM to be going terribly fast!”


19 posted on 10/30/2012 1:03:34 AM PDT by golux
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To: Oztrich Boy; Hot Tabasco; PilotDave; NonValueAdded
I am not so sure about all this "sound seamanship" stuff.

I am not, but were I suddenly made her Master I guarantee you I would have run up the Chesapeake and set all anchors - with these winds and this track even Mobjack Bay near the mouth offers almost a thousand of miles of land against the prevailing winds. A seamanship question.

But did she have sufficient ground tackle? A seamanship question.

When tall ship fairies killed the engines, or when someone did not have the right impeller, or fuel filter, or belt, or know how to make the repair, the "risk everyone" decision had already been made.
20 posted on 10/30/2012 1:28:21 AM PDT by golux
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To: golux; NonValueAdded; ottbmare; PilotDave
Although ignorance of pertinent facts has rarely deterred me from making an official suitably be-ribboned report to my insurance companies, esteemed colleagues, and yachting confrères in the past, (as you probably all too well recall), I am taking this one too hard to authoritatively rule right now. Although I had never been aboard, I obsessively followed her creation and subsequent operations in the marine press for some years.

But, it's not the first time a sailing vessel has been caught on that particularly brutal lee shore. It's not the place to be close in, as the Bounty unfortunately demonstrated as she joins the thousands of her sisters who lie sunken in those waters. With 90 mph winds onshore, no auxiliary engine (I think I recall she had a 500Hp MTU) is going to allow a sailing vessel with that much tophamper to claw her way off Cape Hatteras to safer deep water.

I looked at this mess develop on NOAA Radar over the past few days as she moved in from SSE and cannot fathom why anyone would be on that heading, no matter where the heck they were going! So, let's wait for survivor reports to filter in on this one and pray the CG finds the Captain. We should also wait until Wooden Boat opines on the matter, as I think they reported on Bounty's recent overhaul!

21 posted on 10/30/2012 9:23:22 AM PDT by Kenny Bunk (Obama = Allende on drugs.)
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