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To: Katechon
I watched her full 2 hour and 25 minute presentation on YouTube.

She's "dead on" in what she says in terms of it being too late. It can't be walked back. The system will implode.

Her explanation of how contaminated the system is with the stench and decay of CDS ( credit default swaps ) is something I was questioning 3 or 4 years ago, but few thought it meant anything. It turns out this is the terminal disease that will directly cause the implosion.

5 posted on 11/21/2012 9:36:18 PM PST by VideoDoctor
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To: VideoDoctor
This guy -- MICHAEL BURRY -- made tens of millions of dollars betting against sub-prime mortgages loans by buying CDS...

"The idea hit him as he read a book about the evolution of the U.S. bond market and the creation, in the mid-1990s, at J. P. Morgan, of the first corporate credit-default swaps. He came to a passage explaining why banks felt they needed credit-default swaps at all. It wasn’t immediately obvious—after all, the best way to avoid the risk of General Electric’s defaulting on its debt was not to lend to General Electric in the first place. In the beginning, credit-default swaps had been a tool for hedging: some bank had loaned more than they wanted to to General Electric because G.E. had asked for it, and they feared alienating a long-standing client; another bank changed its mind about the wisdom of lending to G.E. at all. Very quickly, however, the new derivatives became tools for speculation: a lot of people wanted to make bets on the likelihood of G.E.’s defaulting. It struck Burry: Wall Street is bound to do the same thing with subprime-mortgage bonds, too. Given what was happening in the real-estate market—and given what subprime-mortgage lenders were doing—a lot of smart people eventually were going to want to make side bets on subprime-mortgage bonds. And the only way to do it would be to buy a credit-default swap.

The credit-default swap would solve the single biggest problem with Mike Burry’s big idea: timing. The subprime-mortgage loans being made in early 2005 were, he felt, almost certain to go bad. But, as their interest rates were set artificially low and didn’t reset for two years, it would be two years before that happened. Subprime mortgages almost always bore floating interest rates, but most of them came with a fixed, two-year “teaser” rate. A mortgage created in early 2005 might have a two-year “fixed” rate of 6 percent that, in 2007, would jump to 11 percent and provoke a wave of defaults. The faint ticking sound of these loans would grow louder with time, until eventually a lot of people would suspect, as he suspected, that they were bombs. Once that happened, no one would be willing to sell insurance on subprime-mortgage bonds. He needed to lay his chips on the table now and wait for the casino to wake up and change the odds of the game. A credit-default swap on a 30-year subprime-mortgage bond was a bet designed to last for 30 years, in theory. He figured that it would take only three to pay off.

The only problem was that there was no such thing as a credit-default swap on a subprime-mortgage bond, not that he could see. He’d need to prod the big Wall Street firms to create them. But which firms? If he was right and the housing market crashed, these firms in the middle of the market were sure to lose a lot of money. There was no point buying insurance from a bank that went out of business the minute the insurance became valuable. He didn’t even bother calling Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers, as they were more exposed to the mortgage-bond market than the other firms. Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, Bank of America, UBS, Merrill Lynch, and Citigroup were, to his mind, the most likely to survive a crash. He called them all. Five of them had no idea what he was talking about; two came back and said that, while the market didn’t exist, it might one day. Inside of three years, credit-default swaps on subprime-mortgage bonds would become a trillion-dollar market and precipitate hundreds of billions of losses inside big Wall Street firms. Yet, when Michael Burry pestered the firms in the beginning of 2005, only Deutsche Bank and Goldman Sachs had any real interest in continuing the conversation. No one on Wall Street, as far as he could tell, saw what he was seeing."

10 posted on 11/21/2012 11:45:58 PM PST by Katechon (tax strike)
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To: VideoDoctor

Here is the Economic Presentation by Ann that VideoDoctor is referring to: "The Economy Is Going To Implode"

11 posted on 11/21/2012 11:46:11 PM PST by Katechon (tax strike)
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To: VideoDoctor
“We have the chance to walk straight back into Rome at the side of Our Lord, face Caesar and show the world how Christians stand and face evil, and bend our knee ONLY to Our Crucified Lord.

And then … watch what happens.

I know where I’m going. I’m going to Rome to face down Caesar Obama and be crucified with Our Lord who already has and will have the Final Victory. If you should meet Our Lord as you are exiting Rome, will you turn around, take up your cross and go with Him, or will you lower your eyes and pretend not to see Him?

Where are YOU going?

Quo Vadis?”

– Ann Barnhardt


12 posted on 11/21/2012 11:46:23 PM PST by Katechon (tax strike)
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