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To: neverdem
My take on this is similar to the situation in N. Korea. You have sociopaths at the helm of a country. Militarily neither country isn't considered a great threat, but a threat none the less. The leaders of these counties have demonstrated a great zeal for their ideology and the hell with the well being of their countries citizens. Either one is like an animal with the size of their respective cages getting smaller (sanctions). The great question is will they eventually give up on their personal ‘god-like’ ambitions and fade away, or will they lash out like the wounded animals they are and cause great damage and suffering to their neighboring countries before they are ‘put out of their misery’.
13 posted on 11/23/2012 3:54:53 PM PST by Traveler59 ( Truth is a journey, not a destination.)
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To: Traveler59
The great question is will they eventually give up on their personal ‘god-like’ ambitions ...or will they lash out ..... and cause great damage and suffering to their neighboring countries before they are ‘put out of their misery’.

History is not encouraging. In tiny countries without resources or neighbors, megalomanic despots come and go without much notice in the wider world, but when they have the resources, they tend to lash out. Example: The Paraguayan caudillo Lopez Solano, who intermeddled in an Uruguayan civil war and started a three-on-one war in which two-thirds of the manhood of Paraguay was killed on the battlefield, including the caudillo himself. Paraguay remained impoverished well into the reign of dictator Alfredo Stroessner in the 1960's.

As an odd coda, the end of Paraguay's struggle with Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay saw a diplomatic struggle over territory that, by the agreement of all parties, the United States was called upon to mediate.

President Rutherford B. Hayes's proposed resolution was not overly harsh on Paraguay and left an important territory in their hands, as a result of which, in modern Paraguay, President Hayes has a special day dedicated in his name, in memory of America's friendship toward a prostrate and friendless people in the extremity of their humiliation. It is still a big deal in Paraguay, celebrated the way Cinco de Mayo is here in parts of the United States, with fireworks, illuminations, salutes, and parties.

15 posted on 11/23/2012 4:29:48 PM PST by lentulusgracchus
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