Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Skills Donít Pay the Bills
The New York Times ^ | 11/20/2012 | Adam Davidson

Posted on 11/26/2012 9:40:40 AM PST by ksen

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-2021-4041-6061-70 last
To: Brookhaven

Well, I suppose you’re right. I shouldn’t have been so gracious about their abilities.

I agree with you, they ain’t that curious but, with equipment being used more as an Xbox or PS3 and all they are basically looking for an end result, much like running a cash register.

The are inputting or scanning to get to a result and it just isn’t high skill labor and the wage reflects that.


61 posted on 11/26/2012 3:01:05 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: ksen

If they offered $100 an hour, they’d go broke, and nobody would have a job. The math is easy enough. They open the park, people pay a certain amount to come in, they can pay the workers something less than that amount.

You didn’t explain why you think that it is “union-bashing” the hurt the unions, rather than the unions screwing up that LED to union-bashing. My argument is that unions lost their way, and became less useful to workers, and that’s why they lost members.

We bash unions because they aren’t really helping their people, and instead are using their political influence to take away the freedom of workers to CHOOSE to represent themselves. They fight to stop right-to-work states, and to collect union dues from people taking care of their parents in their homes.


62 posted on 11/26/2012 4:21:18 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 60 | View Replies]

To: Nepeta

They did not work for “no pay”. They may not have received pay for an hourly hourly rate but they didn’t work for nothing either. They got something in return. Maybe they kept their job, or lined themselves up for promotion, or maybe they just got to suck up to the boss.


63 posted on 11/26/2012 4:33:56 PM PST by FreedomNotSafety
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 50 | View Replies]

To: Osage Orange

I do not think the Dems have the answer either because they do not believe in fiscal responsibility. GOP on the other hand trust businessmen too much. It is ironic that the free market types do recognize self interest or greed plays a role in driving a person’s behavior, but have a lax attitude toward the consequences of greed unchecked. Psych have evaluated the behavior pattern of CEO’s and execs and find about 20 percent exhibit sociopath traits. Add the ability to invent deals and investment vehicles no one understands, access to other people’s money and a gov that is clueless and you have the recipe for grand fraud. What happen with liar loans and the selling of mortgage portfolios riddled with liar loans as AAA investments while the firm selling the notes were betting against it thru hedge funds should raise big red flags on unlimited trust of businessmen.
The CEO of Crazy Eddy Electronics was interviewed and asked why he cooked the inventory figures and books to commit stock fraud. His answer was no one was looking and the money was there. I agree with conservatives that we do not need more rules, but we need to enforce the rules. Gov has a role in the market, it needs to monitor business activity and the activity of businessmen to make sure they do not cheat the consumer nor corrupt the gov officials. Fail to follow these principles, the financial meltdown of 2008 will be repeated again like scandals of the past 40 years.
I know the argument that the gov was solely responsible for causing the financial meltdown in 2008. CRA did force banks to overlook certain criteria for minorities to get loans. At least these mortgage notes were flagged as subprime. Liar loans had no flag and were rated AAA fraudulently. Since the gov created a loophole for criteria and were willing to buy the notes after six months without checking the info on the application (to insure proper AAA rating) does that mean the banker can take advantage of the stupid loophole that can destroy the financial system of the world and US? Or do conservatives believe that short term profit is allowable because it is legal and the businessman is not responsible for the long term effects of his behavior even if it means the destruction of the US? That is what some freepers are inadvertently defending. Our founding fathers warned us that in order for our republic to be successful it will need moral and virtuous men. Business community has not projected such image.
At this point some freepers are pissed, let me remind them who hired the illegals and paid them under the table. It wasn’t the Dems it was businessmen. Who sold more accurate guidance systems to the PLA and lobbied Clinton to overrule the DoD. Could it not have been, oh oh it is coming back, it was a CEO of Loral (businessman)!!!!


64 posted on 11/26/2012 5:52:21 PM PST by Fee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: FreedomNotSafety
They did not work for “no pay”. They may not have received pay for an hourly hourly rate but they didn’t work for nothing either. They got something in return. Maybe they kept their job, or lined themselves up for promotion, or maybe they just got to suck up to the boss.

I was there. You were not. It was illegal, and had anyone been injured, there would have been insurance problems. At that time, NONE of these people had any possibility of promotion; that was company policy.

Pay was lousy--at this time, fewer than 50% accepted P&G's offers for lab technicians, and armies of temps kept things afloat. I knew couples with families who both worked as technicians, and who both had second jobs to keep food on the table. Nobody BOUGHT P&G brands because they couldn't afford them!

P&G rode their technical employees into the ground, then brought in fresh hires when the 2% raises every 24 months (no cost of living increases)thinned the ranks.

You had to leave to make decent money. Several people quit and went to medical school.
65 posted on 11/27/2012 4:04:06 AM PST by Nepeta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 63 | View Replies]

To: raybbr

>>Why a cap?<<

All hourly positions are capped.

>>Is OT a condition on hiring?<<

It’s mandatory, and applicants are informed of such.

>>If so, why? Can’t you manage the dept on straight time workers?<<

We’re a Tier 1 supplier and business is booming in the auto industry. If our customers are working, so are we.


66 posted on 11/27/2012 4:50:33 AM PST by ItsOurTimeNow ("This ain't no party, this ain't no disco, this ain't no foolin' around.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: ex91B10

>>Drug screening at random?<<

Yes.

>>Required to report arrest (for any reason) to the employer?<<

Nope, only convictions.

>>Deny employment because of a five or ten year old criminal act (OUI or drugs)?<<

All on a case by case basis - depends on the severity of the conviction and how long ago it was.

>>Want Facebook/social networking passwords?<<

lol...no. What an employee does on their own time is their business.


67 posted on 11/27/2012 4:58:35 AM PST by ItsOurTimeNow ("This ain't no party, this ain't no disco, this ain't no foolin' around.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Nepeta

I wasn’t there but I am not buying the “insurance problems” line. What a crock. Every insurance policy that P&G had in place was still in place when those employees where working. If they got hurt they would still get worker’s comp and I am sure they still had their company paid health insurance. The company’s liability policies were still in full force.

Wow it was so hard that some of them had to go to med school and some of them had to find other jobs. Oh the horror of it all, people making decisions based on their self interest. Some employees decided to work off the clock and some decide to quit. Some thought it was a great paying job and others left for more money.

Sounds like you are happy with alot of rules and hall monitors.


68 posted on 11/27/2012 12:32:55 PM PST by FreedomNotSafety
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 65 | View Replies]

To: FreedomNotSafety
I wasn’t there but I am not buying the “insurance problems” line. What a crock. Every insurance policy that P&G had in place was still in place when those employees where working. If they got hurt they would still get worker’s comp and I am sure they still had their company paid health insurance. The company’s liability policies were still in full force.

Again, I was there and YOU WERE NOT. This was not a universal company practice; there was in fact a stink raised when the practice was uncovered, and the managers lied about what was happening, denying that anyone was working outside of regular hours. The insurance issue was very real.

Wow it was so hard that some of them had to go to med school and some of them had to find other jobs. Oh the horror of it all, people making decisions based on their self interest. Some employees decided to work off the clock and some decide to quit. Some thought it was a great paying job and others left for more money.

Nobody thought it was a great paying job. My point was that they underpaid some good people, and lost a lot of talent out the door, some of it to competitors. It's a stupid way to run a business.

Sounds like you are happy with alot of rules and hall monitors.

Sounds like you are projecting.

As a matter of fact, I attended a PUBLIC high school that had no hall monitors, no hall passes, oil paintings on the walls, large sculptures and nothing was defaced. I don't need a tight leash to behave, and I prefer working with people who don't need one, either.
69 posted on 11/28/2012 3:27:16 PM PST by Nepeta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]

To: FreedomNotSafety
I wasn’t there but I am not buying the “insurance problems” line. What a crock. Every insurance policy that P&G had in place was still in place when those employees where working. If they got hurt they would still get worker’s comp and I am sure they still had their company paid health insurance. The company’s liability policies were still in full force.

Again, I was there and YOU WERE NOT. This was not a universal company practice; there was in fact a stink raised when the practice was uncovered, and the managers lied about what was happening, denying that anyone was working outside of regular hours. The insurance issue was very real.

Wow it was so hard that some of them had to go to med school and some of them had to find other jobs. Oh the horror of it all, people making decisions based on their self interest. Some employees decided to work off the clock and some decide to quit. Some thought it was a great paying job and others left for more money.

Nobody thought it was a great paying job. My point was that they underpaid some good people, and lost a lot of talent out the door, some of it to competitors. It's a stupid way to run a business.

Sounds like you are happy with alot of rules and hall monitors.

Sounds like you are projecting.

As a matter of fact, I attended a PUBLIC high school that had no hall monitors, no hall passes, oil paintings on the walls, large sculptures and nothing was defaced. I don't need a tight leash to behave, and I prefer working with people who don't need one, either.
70 posted on 11/28/2012 3:28:14 PM PST by Nepeta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-2021-4041-6061-70 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson