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Might as well just hand your entire wallet over now and get it over with, along with your bank account and safe deposit box.
1 posted on 11/26/2012 3:13:40 PM PST by Timber Rattler
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To: Timber Rattler

I live in Texas, we don’t have furnaces... we have outside


2 posted on 11/26/2012 3:15:55 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Timber Rattler

Greenhouse gas production - pure BS. Millions and billions spent on nonsense.


3 posted on 11/26/2012 3:16:41 PM PST by Williams (No Obama)
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To: Timber Rattler

My last gas furnace was installed over twenty years ago and vented directly outside. I don’t remember that running twenty feet of three inch plastic pipe cost all that much.


4 posted on 11/26/2012 3:17:05 PM PST by muir_redwoods (Don't fire until you see the blue of their helmets)
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To: Timber Rattler

Cool venting gas furnaces are more efficient, and I have neighbors who have them just because they want to. I don’t know why the cool vent can’t also be sent to a chimney or to a roof top vent for convenience sake. The vent is a curiosity because it hisses most of the time.


6 posted on 11/26/2012 3:19:18 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: Timber Rattler
Might as well just hand your entire wallet over now and get it over with, along with your bank account and safe deposit box.

Stupid people in this country vote for this sh#t. Makes me want to puke.

11 posted on 11/26/2012 3:20:40 PM PST by Marathoner (Our forefathers would be shooting by now.)
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To: Timber Rattler

I don’t think the Federal government has any business getting involved in such mandates. But I suspect that these higher efficiency furnaces will save most users quite a bit of money.


14 posted on 11/26/2012 3:23:48 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Timber Rattler
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
15 posted on 11/26/2012 3:24:49 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Timber Rattler
We have a delightful device called a ventless Natural Gas space heater.
best money we spent on the house (East Tenn.)

vents, we don't need no stinking vents


18 posted on 11/26/2012 3:26:24 PM PST by HangnJudge
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To: Timber Rattler

And where in the Constitution does Congress have the power to develop regional standards for central heating and cooling equipment?


19 posted on 11/26/2012 3:27:16 PM PST by Petrosius
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To: Timber Rattler
Might as well just hand your entire wallet over now and get it over with, along with your bank account and safe deposit box.

Yes, and I'm sure the media already has this headline set up as a template with a fill-in-the-blank where the word "furnace" appears. They'll be using it a lot.

21 posted on 11/26/2012 3:28:04 PM PST by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Timber Rattler

Maybe we could just go back to burning corn in a space-heater, much like was used during the Depression. Back then, the price of corn was so low that country folks burned the corn rather than using wood harvested from the woodlot, as it was easier to make ready for the stove, and had much higher heat content per pound of fuel consumed.

Newer more modern forms of corn-burning stoves are competitive with natural gas in heating costs, they have thermostat controls, and the exhaust is as simple as a dryer vent to an external wall. They depend on a fan to circulate heat produced by convection, and are stoked by an electrically-driven auger. The ashes are a small clinker that may be broken up and allowed to compost.


25 posted on 11/26/2012 3:31:22 PM PST by alloysteel (Bronco Bama - the cowboy who whooped up and widened the stampede.)
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To: Timber Rattler

Natural gas: low demand, high supply= low price now.

That could change one day.


26 posted on 11/26/2012 3:32:44 PM PST by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: Timber Rattler

This is cool, now I have another entrepreneurial opportunity:

Used furnace black market. Sell and install good used furnaces for fun and profit without telling Big Brother.

Just like DeNiro in the movie Brazil, I will skulk around at night, tune old furnaces or install bootleg furnaces in defiance of “The ONE.”

The older fuel oil fired furnaces are especially easy. Face lift the fire box with a wet pack, put a new nozzle on the atomizer, and that suka will last another 30 years or more!

Gas furnace old? Change out the manifold, check the electrics and you are good to go too.

Thanks for the biz opportunity barry boy.


37 posted on 11/26/2012 3:57:52 PM PST by ConradofMontferrat
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To: Timber Rattler

In all fairness, low efficiency heaters and a/c need to be phased out, replaced with a much more cost effective technology, called thin sheet aerogel.

Aerogel is amazing stuff, first invented in 1931. Until just the last few years it was the lightest known solid material. Unfortunately, it was both very expensive and brittle. But why does it matter?

Because aerogel is a ridiculously efficient heat insulator, for both cold and heat. If you lined a sleeping bag with a 3mm layer of aerogel, you could sleep out in the open during a blizzard in the Arctic, at least until you couldn’t stand the sauna like heat inside your sleeping bag any more.

But for years it was just an oddity, because, as I said, it was both expensive and brittle. Until about a decade ago, when somebody created far less expensive, flexible, thin sheet aerogel.

They are now putting thin sheet aerogel into mass production. NASA wants to use it to insulate space probes from the cold of space. Otherwise the potential demand is huge.

If you insulated your oven or refrigerator with it, it would use far less energy. If you insulated your house with it, you could probably heat your house with an illegal 100W bulb and body heat, in the dead of winter. In the desert southwest in summer, you could air condition your entire house with window air conditioner.

For now, thin sheet aerogel is still expensive, but things change. And if you can save hundreds or thousands of dollars every year from heating and cooling, why not?


38 posted on 11/26/2012 3:58:47 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (DIY Bumper Sticker: "THREE TIMES,/ DEMOCRATS/ REJECTED GOD")
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To: Timber Rattler

Elections have consequences


41 posted on 11/26/2012 4:05:23 PM PST by NonValueAdded (Happy 10th FR birthday to meeeeeeeeee)
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To: Timber Rattler

I don’t know about the efficiency of a gas furnace, but I do know of two separate family members who got CO2 poisoning because of faulty furnaces. Both suffered severe brain damage as a result.

My daughter has a gas furnace vented directly into her chimney. There is only about two feet distance between them. To vent hers through a wall would require about fifteen feet of horizontal run and I would not trust it.

I have vent free heaters in my bedrooms and keep a window open slightly to provide air.

In my den I installed a ventless fireplace and I immediately began to have problems with fumes in the den. After a couple of years, I pulled out the burner and found that the air inlet to the mixing chamber was only two drilled 1/4 inch holes. I then drilled a third hole and have had no problems since.

What makes me wonder about the fireplace is that I purchased it FROM MY GAS COMPANY! They should have known better!


49 posted on 11/26/2012 4:29:10 PM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (The parasites now outnumber the producers.)
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To: Timber Rattler

Wow - sure makes me glad the guy’s coming tomorrow to finish installing my new 92% efficient gas furnace - no more oil, not that there’s anything wrong with that...


54 posted on 11/26/2012 4:42:17 PM PST by Intolerant in NJ
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To: Timber Rattler
I own a 1947 vintage house in Pocatello that was originally fitted with a coal chute and a boiler for steam radiators. The house was refitted with a 92% efficient natural gas forced air furnace. The air inlet/outlet is PVC pipe directly to the back of the house. When operating it makes a little noise and some steam outside.

My other house is also natural gas/forced air with a heat pump outside that only serves as the air conditioning condenser. That vent goes straight to the roof. The house is 1986 vintage. I don't know the efficiency rating, but it is likely I'll have a more expensive replacement coming in the future.

61 posted on 11/26/2012 5:03:14 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: Timber Rattler

Actually, these condensing furnaces are not a bad idea - IF you can vent them as required without much cost. They basically use the hot exhaust from combustion to pre-heat the incoming air, so less heat actually heads up the chimney.

But with less heat, the waste air holds less water...and the water (which is a product of combustion) condenses and has to drain. You must use PVC or equivalent for the exhaust air (which is quite cool)...or the Carbonic Acid (created when water mixes with CO2, another product of combustion) will eat away anything else.

So, for new construction, these are great units and should be required (in my opinion) - but in old houses, it does get a lot trickier, and rather than dumping the HUGE cost on homeowners, a serious effort should have been made to either pay for the ventilation modifications, or not require them.

What happens now, with this mandate, is that homeowners will simply not replace furnaces (this stuff is EASY to figure out), but instead will keep their existing ones limping along. That’s fine until the heat exchanger cracks and people start dropping dead from Carbon Monoxide poisoning. But, unfortunately, that IS how the real world works.


65 posted on 11/26/2012 5:19:34 PM PST by BobL (You can live each day only once. You can waste a few, but don't waste too many.)
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To: Timber Rattler

I’m just glad the headline didn’t read:

“New federal law may make replacing your fiancee much costlier.”


88 posted on 11/26/2012 7:38:14 PM PST by Redcitizen (A good pun is its own reword.)
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