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The Shot That Prevents Heart Attacks
Yahoo.net ^ | 11-26-2012 | Lisa Collier Cool

Posted on 11/27/2012 5:42:20 AM PST by blam

The Shot That Prevents Heart Attacks

By Lisa Collier Cool
Nov 26, 2012

If you’re tempted to skip your flu shot, consider this: Getting vaccinated cuts risk for a heart attack or stroke by up to 50 percent, according to two studies presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

Scientists from TIMU Study Group and Network for Innovation in Clinical Research analyzed published clinical trials involving a total of 3,227 patients, half of whom had been diagnosed with heart disease. Participants, whose average age was 60, were randomly assigned to either receive flu vaccine or a placebo shot, then their health was tracked for 12 months.

Those who got the flu shot were 50 percent less likely to suffer major cardiac events (such as heart attacks or strokes) and 40 percent less likely to die of cardiac causes. Similar trends were found in patients with and without previous heart disease. The findings suggest “that flu vaccine is a heart vaccine,” lead study author Jacob Udell told Fox News.

Why do flu shots help prevent heart attacks? To learn more, I talked to Bradley Bale, MD, medical director of the Heart Health Program for Grace Clinic in Lubbock, Texas.

Flu and Heart Attacks Strike in Tandem

A number of studies have shown a link between heart attacks and a prior respiratory infection. A 2010 study of about 78,000 patients age 40 or older found that those who had gotten a flu shot in the previous year were 20 percent less likely to suffer a first heart attack, even when such cardiovascular risks as smoking, high cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes were taken in account.

Scarier still, researchers report that up to 91,000 Americans a year die from heart attacks and strokes triggered by flu. This grim statistic prompted the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology to issue guidelines recommending vaccination for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The CDC advises flu shots for everyone over six months of age, but cautions that certain people should check with a medical provider before being immunized.

Sadly, fewer than half of Americans with high-risk conditions like heart disease get the shot, leaving themselves dangerously unprotected against both flu complications and cardiovascular events. In fact, the CDC actually uses heart attack rates to track seasonal flu outbreaks, says Dr. Bale. “They look for areas with a sudden surge in heart attacks and send a team to investigate, because the cause is almost always a spike in flu cases.”

The Inflammation Connection

To picture how flu could ignite a heart attack or stroke in someone with CVD, think of cholesterol plaque as kindling, says Dr. Bale. “Inflammation, which has recently been shown to actually cause heart attacks, is what lights the match, causing plaque to explosively rupture through the arterial wall.”

When a plaque rupture tears the blood vessel lining, the body tries to heal the injury by forming a blood clot. If the clot obstructs a coronary artery, it can trigger a heart attack, while a clot that travels to the brain could ignite an ischemic stroke. It’s a myth that plaque buildup alone sparks heart attacks, since numerous studies have shown that what chokes off flow to the heart is a clot.

“Inflammation is a key player in destabilizing plaque, explaining why some people with relatively little build up in their arteries have heart attacks or stroke, while others with substantial plaque deposits never suffer these events,” says Dr. Bale, who advises all of his patients to get flu shots to guard against inflammation, the body’s response to viral and bacterial infections.

Another surprising benefit of getting a flu shot is reduced risk for pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in the lungs) and deep vein thrombosis (a clot in the legs). A 2008 study found that the threat of developing these problems dropped by 26 percent overall in participants who had been vaccinated in the previous year, with a 48 percent risk reduction in patients younger than 52.

Other Vaccines that Reduce Heart Attack Risk

Along with a flu shot, Dr. Bale recommends two other vaccinations to reduce heart attack and stroke risk if you’re 50 or older and have CVD. If you don’t have plaque in your arteries, you should still get these shots, but at an older age, as discussed below:

• The herpes zoster vaccination against shingles. This shot protects against reactivation of the chickenpox virus almost everyone was exposed to during childhood. The virus, which lies dormant in nerve cells, can flare up, typically in older people, and cause a blistering skin rash that can lead to chronic nerve pain. Two large studies report that people who develop shingles are at up to four times higher risk for stroke, highlighting the value of vaccination. While shingles usually targets people who are 60 or older, about 20 percent of cases occur in people ages 50 to 59, which is why Dr. Bale advises being vaccinated at 50 if you have CVD. The CDC recommends the shot for everyone who is 65 or older, and people who are 19 or older and smoke or have asthma.

• Vaccination against pneumococcal pneumonia. If you’re 65 or older—or younger with risk factors for pneumonia—such as heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, or diabetes—the CDC advises being immunized against pneumococcal pneumonia. A study of more than 84,000 people found that those who had been vaccinated were at lower risk for both heart attack and stroke. Given these benefits, Dr. Bale advises heart patients to be immunized at 50.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: flushot; flushots; heartattack; heartdisease; stroke
My mother got Guillain–Barré Syndrome from her flu shot in 1976.

I get flu shots yearly without any obvious problems.

1 posted on 11/27/2012 5:42:26 AM PST by blam
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To: blam
Flu ... pneumonia ... shingles shots
Wow, I hit the Trifecta - got all three within the last two months.
2 posted on 11/27/2012 5:48:41 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: blam

I don’t bother. I get sick twice a year whether I take the shot or not.


3 posted on 11/27/2012 5:57:45 AM PST by EQAndyBuzz (George W. Bush is the Emmanuel Goldstein of the modern era.)
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To: EQAndyBuzz
"I don’t bother. I get sick twice a year whether I take the shot or not."

Me too until I started taking 4,000 IU of vitamin 'D' a day. I haven't been sick in five years.

The Antibiotic Vitamin

4 posted on 11/27/2012 6:18:07 AM PST by blam
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To: oh8eleven
Why do you take a shingles shot? Does it prevent shingles?

Do you recommend it?

5 posted on 11/27/2012 6:21:06 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

This article sounds like a Vaccine commercial.


6 posted on 11/27/2012 6:22:00 AM PST by Venturer
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To: blam

Any doctors chiming in?


7 posted on 11/27/2012 6:28:45 AM PST by Baynative
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To: EQAndyBuzz
Would those two times happen to be Fall and Spring around the time when the weather changes? That’s when I always get some kind of head/chest conjestion for a week or two. I figure it's allergies. I can't recall the last time I had a fever or a stomach bug. The last flu shot I got was the Swine Flu shot in '76
8 posted on 11/27/2012 6:29:10 AM PST by Jack of all Trades (Hold your face to the light, even though for the moment you do not see.)
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To: EQAndyBuzz
I haven't had the flu since I was 25. Almost 30 years. I see no need for the flu shot for me considering the horror stories I've heard of health problems afterwards.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

9 posted on 11/27/2012 6:29:37 AM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts ('Need' now means wanting someone else's money. 'Greed' means wanting to keep your own...)
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To: EQAndyBuzz

I’ve always figured that if everyone else is getting flu shots, I’m good to go without one.


10 posted on 11/27/2012 6:30:14 AM PST by Baynative
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To: blam

This article is buuuull poop.

Did you know that people who recently ate ice cream at the beach have 75% less skiing accidents?

What they won’t do to push that flipping vaccine.

Yes, if you don’t want the flu, take 5-10k iu vitamin d, which is more of a hormone than a vitamin. The older or sicker among us probably need more than 5000.


11 posted on 11/27/2012 6:34:47 AM PST by Yaelle
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To: blam

Funny the VA just sent me a bunch of Vit D say I have a severe deficiency..I guess I’ll take a few and see what happens.


12 posted on 11/27/2012 6:36:10 AM PST by montanajoe
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To: blam

I haven’t had a flu shot since 1966 when the AF forced the issue. Three years ago my wife and I started taking 10k units of Vitamin D-3 daily through the winter. She is a school teacher who teaches k to 2nd grade. Before we started the D-3 she got flu shots annually and brought flu and colds home 3-5 times a school year. Neither of us has had any virus, cold, flu, or flu shots in the three years. It’s cheap.


13 posted on 11/27/2012 6:37:55 AM PST by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE www.fee.org/library/books/economics-in-one-lesson)
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To: Jack of all Trades; blam; Baynative

Vitamin D-3 through the winter. No more colds or flu and maybe no more some other viruses. Colds and flu are from a lack of sunshine- vitamin D- on the skin. Take the D-3 supplement through the winter when you keep your skin covered up and the sun is at a less effective low angle.


14 posted on 11/27/2012 6:44:54 AM PST by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economics In One Lesson ONLINE www.fee.org/library/books/economics-in-one-lesson)
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To: arthurus

I take 3000 IU of Vitamin D daily. Part of that is from a multivitamin, part from 1000 IU capsules. I used to just wing it, and take 1 capsule. With 2, my blood tests show that I’m at the high end of the range for D. : )


15 posted on 11/27/2012 6:56:02 AM PST by Jack of all Trades (Hold your face to the light, even though for the moment you do not see.)
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To: EQAndyBuzz

You may have chronically low serum vitamin D levels.

A few pointers about that:

A small number of people are sensitive to D supplements, and another small number don’t absorb D supplements very well. Most people can take a substantial amount over a long period of time without difficulty.

While sunshine is a good way to get D, it can take a few days for it to get into the blood. Oddly enough, people in hot, sunny states commonly have *low* D serum levels, for unknown reasons.

D has at least half a dozen mechanisms against pathogens, from a breakdown product that damages the viral coating, to opening immune pathways against pathogens. It is also a natural ACE inhibitor, which moderates the immune response, to prevent a damaging overreaction to infection.


16 posted on 11/27/2012 7:30:51 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (DIY Bumper Sticker: "THREE TIMES,/ DEMOCRATS/ REJECTED GOD")
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To: blam

Importantly, there is some concern that vaccines do not ‘take’ as well in the elderly or weak immune system people, or last as long, as they do in younger and healthier people. So some doctors are recommending that elderly people should get an early season flu shot, as soon as it becomes available, and then get a booster shot around December-January.


17 posted on 11/27/2012 7:34:22 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (DIY Bumper Sticker: "THREE TIMES,/ DEMOCRATS/ REJECTED GOD")
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To: Jack of all Trades

I looked at the allergy angle. Turns out I got them once I moved to Texas from Jersey. I figured I built up an immunity in Jersey from all the crap in the air.

I got to Texas and the Mountain Cedar kicked my butt.

The flu I have been getting every year for the last 30 years. Just one of those things. I think the infections are the result of the allergies.


18 posted on 11/27/2012 8:02:15 AM PST by EQAndyBuzz (George W. Bush is the Emmanuel Goldstein of the modern era.)
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To: blam
Why do you take a shingles shot? Does it prevent shingles?
Yes it does ... I suggest you check w/ your doctor to see if he/she recommends it.
19 posted on 11/27/2012 8:17:04 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Yaelle

Bull poop indeed. Vaccine pushers inc. at work.

But I’m not a Vit D gobbler either. Get enough sun in the summer and you’ll be OK. - (the sun is not evil). For vitamin D supplements, the excitement is way ahead of the science.


20 posted on 11/27/2012 8:20:29 AM PST by Rennes Templar (Be positive: America is greater than Obama.)
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To: blam

Yes it does prevent Shingles. Two of my neighbors (males in their 70’s) developed Shingles several years ago. Extremely painful and drawn out condition. Made me a believer! You post covered a most important topic. Thank you.


21 posted on 11/27/2012 8:58:39 AM PST by fuzzthatwuz
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To: montanajoe
"Funny the VA just sent me a bunch of Vit D say I have a severe deficiency..I guess I’ll take a few and see what happens."

Make sure it's vitamin D3, not D2...I've read that D2 is made from plants and is nearly worthless for humans.

22 posted on 11/27/2012 10:27:24 AM PST by blam
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To: fuzzthatwuz; oh8eleven
Thanks.

My dad had shingles shortly after his heart attack and heart operation. He said that shingles were worse/more painful than any of the heart problems.

23 posted on 11/27/2012 10:32:57 AM PST by blam
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To: blam
He said that shingles were worse/more painful ...
Yes, I've heard that. On the other hand, my mother-in-law had them and said they were just a nuisance.
BTW, I believe you are safe from shingles if you've never had chicken pox.
24 posted on 11/27/2012 10:41:24 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: blam
They gave me 50000 units of D-2 weekly and 2000 units of D-3 daily. I guess D-3 is not available in 50000 unit dosage in the US which seems kinda weird..and they want go get the level up as quickly as possible (its a 5) so I guess the D-2 will have to do..
25 posted on 11/27/2012 1:04:26 PM PST by montanajoe
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