Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Researchers genetically alter wheat to make it nearly free of gluten
Phys.org ^ | 11-27-2012 | Staff

Posted on 11/27/2012 9:39:28 AM PST by Red Badger

—An international team of researchers has succeeded in genetically altering wheat seeds to prevent the production of gluten in subsequent plants. The effort focused, the team writes in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, on disabling the enzyme responsible for activating genes responsible for the development of gluten protein.

The research team is part of an effort by many groups to solve the problem of celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten. The current treatment for patients with the disorder is to instruct them to avoid foods with gluten in it. The problem with that approach of course is that it leads to a difficult to maintain, severely restricted diet.

Recent research has centered around trying to isolate certain types of grains that don't produce gluten and switching over to them. That effort has run into trouble however as thus far none have been found that are safe for celiac patients. Another approach has been to try to develop a substance that could be added to the diet to aid in the digestion of gluten. But such efforts on that front have failed as well.

This latest research has taken a different approach: altering current grains to cause them to not produce gluten in the first place. To alter samples of wheat seeds, the researchers focused on the enzyme DEMETER which is responsible for activating a group of genes that result in the production of gluten. Using several genetic engineering techniques they managed to suppress the DENMETER enzyme by 85.6 percent which resulted in a 76.4 percent reduction of gluten in the seeds that were produced. The researchers acknowledge that more work lies ahead to reach the ultimate goal of removing gluten from the wheat seeds altogether, but they say their results so far have given them confidence that they will be able to soon meet their objective. They also note that flour made with the seeds they've altered thus far appears to still be suitable for making bread. They also add that even as their attempts move forward to remove gluten altogether from grains, other research will commence to determine if such grains will allow for use in foods by those that suffer from celiac disease, with tests being conducted on mice and gluten sensitive apes.

More information:

Structural genes of wheat and barley 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases and their potential applications for human health, PNAS, Published online before print November 26, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1217927109 Abstract Wheat supplies about 20% of the total food calories consumed worldwide and is a national staple in many countries. Besides being a key source of plant proteins, it is also a major cause of many diet-induced health issues, especially celiac disease.

The only effective treatment for this disease is a total gluten-free diet. The present report describes an effort to develop a natural dietary therapy for this disorder by transcriptional suppression of wheat DEMETER (DME) homeologs using RNA interference. DME encodes a 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase responsible for transcriptional derepression of gliadins and low-molecular-weight glutenins (LMWgs) by active demethylation of their promoters in the wheat endosperm. Previous research has demonstrated these proteins to be the major source of immunogenic epitopes.

In this research, barley and wheat DME genes were cloned and localized on the syntenous chromosomes. Nucleotide diversity among DME homeologs was studied and used for their virtual transcript profiling. Functional conservation of DME enzyme was confirmed by comparing the motif and domain structure within and across the plant kingdom. Presence and absence of CpG islands in prolamin gene sequences was studied as a hallmark of hypo- and hypermethylation, respectively. Finally the epigenetic influence of DME silencing on accumulation of LMWgs and gliadins was studied using 20 transformants expressing hairpin RNA in their endosperm. These transformants showed up to 85.6% suppression in DME transcript abundance and up to 76.4% reduction in the amount of immunogenic prolamins, demonstrating the possibility of developing wheat varieties compatible for the celiac patients.

Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; gluten
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/11/21/1217927109
1 posted on 11/27/2012 9:39:37 AM PST by Red Badger
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
I wonder, One could make a lot of stuff without gluttons, but I thought Bread required gluttons to rise properly?????
2 posted on 11/27/2012 9:46:44 AM PST by cotton
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

See tagline...


3 posted on 11/27/2012 9:47:20 AM PST by null and void (Knowledge increases exponentially, wisdom increases logarithmically.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cotton
You can't make real bread without gluten. Period.

There's a reason I use high protein flour to make bread, and low protein flour to make cakes.

Sorry for the people with the medical problem, but I'll continue to use real wheat flour.

/johnny

4 posted on 11/27/2012 9:54:03 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: cotton

Gluten is what makes bread hold together, and springy.

The leavening is what makes it rise, baking soda, yeast, etc......


5 posted on 11/27/2012 9:54:25 AM PST by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Unless you suffer from celiac disease, there's no reason to avoid gluten.

UP WITH GLUTEN!!

6 posted on 11/27/2012 9:59:19 AM PST by TChris ("Hello", the politician lied.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

So long, Mrs. Baird. So long, Crispy Creme. So long, hot dog and hamburger buns so so long summer grill outs and fast food. Hello, Moochelle’s garden.


7 posted on 11/27/2012 10:02:38 AM PST by bgill (We've passed the point of no return. Welcome to Al Amerika.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

Gluten is the reason wheat is central to society: it makes dough sticky enough to “rise” and thus bread desirable to eat. Without gluten, wheat is little more than any other non-”rising” grain. “Bread” made of oats, rice, etc just isn’t that appealing. If gluten-free wheat gets anywhere its because high-gluten wheat paved the way and keeps that path going.


8 posted on 11/27/2012 10:03:00 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Correct. CO2 released by the yeast or baking powder, and held in the bread by the gluten is what causes it to rise.

No gluten, no CO2 entrapment, no rise.

/johnny

9 posted on 11/27/2012 10:19:41 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Gluten makes me sick as a dog. I made the mistake of eating at El Torito's 9 days ago. The time sticks in my mind because it took 8 days for the gluten exposure consequences to abate. Frankly, I'm not interested in having gluten free bread. It's not appealing. I'd rather have no bread at all.

Of more concern is the prospect of using the gene silencing techniques in a food grain. There is a variant in the lab that silences glycogen and the genetic material can be passed to the next generation of human from a mother who consumes it. The result is a child who can't make glycogen is dies early. Not a good idea to let that out of the lab unless you're trying to exterminate humans.

10 posted on 11/27/2012 10:28:25 AM PST by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bgill

Not “ hello moochelles garden” for me.

I can’t eat wheat/barley/gluten OR dairy.

Atkins diet is a way of life for me.

Goodbye POUNDS!


11 posted on 11/27/2012 10:29:46 AM PST by WildHighlander57 ((WildHighlander57 returning after lurking since 2000))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
What could go wrong?
12 posted on 11/27/2012 10:30:17 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Labor unions are the Communist Party of the USA.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ctdonath2

My wife has celiac disease.

Gluten free wheat will never replace normal wheat. However, this is great news for my family. If they can come close to making a gluten free product that tastes similar to “normal” food, great!

I would expect that there will be a very limited market for such wheat, and segregation issues will be a major problem as well. But... We will pay a healthy premium to buy this product if it makes it to the market.

I HIGHLY doubt any of you have anything to worry about in regards to gluten free wheat over taking “normal” wheat as the norm.


13 posted on 11/27/2012 10:34:15 AM PST by IL Republican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

bookmark


14 posted on 11/27/2012 10:40:02 AM PST by Matchett-PI (Obama's Shuck and Jive Ends With Benghazi Lies ~ Sarah Palin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Myrddin

We use gene splicing all the time in grains that are used for food consumption.

Roundup ready corn/soybeans are resistant to round up, making it easier and cheaper to kill weeds (higher yield)

Several traits can be added to corn to make it less attractive to insects and root worms (less pesticide applications).

At the end of the day gene splicing has made food cheaper, and for the most part saved us introducing more chemicals into the environment.

It is a good thing.


15 posted on 11/27/2012 10:41:17 AM PST by IL Republican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: IL Republican
Sorry to hear about your wife. I know how hard working around limited diets can be. Prayers up for you and yours.

And you are correct, gluten free will never take over traditional wheat. If for no other reason than some troublemakers will keep the old stuff around, and plant a small plot. Like I do. ;)

/johnny

16 posted on 11/27/2012 10:42:01 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Xanthan Gum can replace the gluten.

I’m able to eat gluten, with no desire to give it up, but my wife is not. She uses this all the time in her baking.

I would assume she could use the Xanthan Gum with a gluten free wheat and come closer to a wheat based flavor than she can now.


17 posted on 11/27/2012 10:45:41 AM PST by IL Republican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Myrddin

I quit gluten nine years ago. I felt such mental clarity after a few weeks I would never go back. I drink two gallons of milk a week though.. my personal addiction. Thankfully, I love beef and bacon. I am among the skinniest non- smoker my age too. Something about that wheat belly.


18 posted on 11/27/2012 10:51:03 AM PST by momincombatboots (Back to West by G-d Virginia.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Thanks for your prayers!

Oats are traditionally on the avoid list for those with celiac, but the main reason is because most oats have come in contact with wheat during harvest/handling.

A few years ago, gluten free oats hit the market. Not genetically modified, just segregated from the start. They cost about 5x as much as traditional oats, but it gives her a chance to enjoy oatmeal like the rest of us.

I’m sure a gluten free wheat would be similar.


19 posted on 11/27/2012 10:53:12 AM PST by IL Republican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: IL Republican
I know it's more difficult and more expensive to deal with. As a culinary professional, I did a little of that, enough to know that I didn't want to have to deal with it long term.

I gained a lot of compassion for those with limited diets, and a lot of gratitude for my own garbage disposal metabolism.

/johnny

20 posted on 11/27/2012 10:59:53 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

I wonder if that’s what’s wrong with the flour I bought this month? It doesn’t want to hold together, has a terrible flavor compared to what it used to, and even vital wheat gluten doesn’t help much. It doesn’t want to brown either, when I make bread...

I’m going to try a change of flour brands and see if that helps. My yeast is brand new, and I’ve been making bread for a very long time...40+ years and suddenly I can’t make bread anymore?

The flour I’m using works good for cakes and pies, but suddenly won’t make bread. I thought maybe poor quality flour due to the drought, and that could still be it, but I won’t buy Aldi’s flour for my breads anymore. It used to work good!


21 posted on 11/27/2012 11:19:34 AM PST by PrairieLady2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

There’s a funny lining here. “Gluten Free” has become a fad among moonbats who have decided that gluten is evil, even if you’re not sensitive to it.

The funny thing is that the same moonbats HATE genetically modified foods. Oh, the dilemmas one faces when one is terminally stupid.


22 posted on 11/27/2012 11:30:35 AM PST by Mr. Know It All
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WildHighlander57
Yep. That is me too. My list: no gluten, eggs, soy, whey protein (dairy), sugar in any form (except certain fruits and liquid Stevia, Salmon.

What I can and choose to eat: Meat, Chicken, Pork, Turkey, Fish, Nuts, Lamb, most veggies, most fruits and berries, whole brown rice, quinoa, and corn.

How do I feel? AMAZING! How do I look? AMAZING! How old am I? 46? How old do I look? Estimate from people's responses . . . 32 to 37 (and that is just from a few wrinkles here and there.

The reason I skip these initial foods listed is that I am highly intolerant. Tried adding once. Became very sick. Feels good to feel good. Don't miss feeling bad. Happy for you too. :-)

I list of what I choose to eat is all that matters to me.

I actually had to quit hanging out with jerks that always wanted to sit around and talk about what I can't eat. Wierd. It was like hanging out with people who want to talk about what shoes sizes the other person can't wear. Stupid. Invasive. Meaningless. I find most people that focus on my diet have their own issues. Nothing wrong with choosing to eat in a way that feels great and reinforces being fully alive.

judging what others eat is bizarre to me. Reminds me of Moochele Obama.

23 posted on 11/27/2012 11:35:21 AM PST by GOP Poet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: GOP Poet

That Salmon I posted goes under what I choose not to eat. A little confusing as written. lol.


24 posted on 11/27/2012 11:36:51 AM PST by GOP Poet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: IL Republican
Roundup ready isn't a good thing. Roundup causes Parkinson's like symptoms over a period of regular exposure at levels far below what is used in commercial agriculture. See link or search terms glyphosate and parkinsons.

Having BT genes in your food is bad news. The common gut bacteria AND your own gut cells can pick up those genetic fragments and generate pesticide in your body. You can't get rid of it once you have been contaminated. It is NOT a good thing. It kills. See BT GMO info

25 posted on 11/27/2012 12:07:13 PM PST by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: PrairieLady2
Check out the "Bob's Red Mill" line of grain products. They have many gluten free offerings if you're missing grains in your diet.
26 posted on 11/27/2012 12:09:34 PM PST by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

And when the gluten-free wheat inevitably cross pollinates in the field with glutenous wheat...


27 posted on 11/27/2012 12:27:21 PM PST by DTogo (High time to bring back the Sons of Liberty !!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DTogo

You get FrankenBun...........


28 posted on 11/27/2012 12:41:14 PM PST by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Myrddin

Try using King Arthur baking mixes....great stuff and gluten free!!! You’ll never know the difference.


29 posted on 11/27/2012 12:47:16 PM PST by itssoamusing (Not all Muslims are terrorists but all terrorists are Muslim)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
You might get genetically inferior wheat more susceptible to weather, disease, pests, etc resulting in wide-spread food shortages.

The old Chiffon margarine commercials come to mind...

30 posted on 11/27/2012 1:01:25 PM PST by DTogo (High time to bring back the Sons of Liberty !!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

Bread has been a staple for thousands of years....Now in the last 5 years it has become EEEvil. Me thinks there is something wrong with people, not wheat.


31 posted on 11/27/2012 1:33:46 PM PST by Minutemen ("It's a Religion of Peace")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: itssoamusing
I'll watch for that brand next time I'm shopping for baking mixes. Whole Foods carries a line of "Udi's" cookies that are pretty decent and didn't cause me any digestive upset. Lots of gluten free stuff is dry, crumbly and tasteless. Better avoided than endured. Rarely rising to the level of enjoyable.
32 posted on 11/27/2012 2:11:24 PM PST by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: DTogo
"The old Chiffon margarine commercials come to mind... "

I've hung around this planet for over 3/4 century, and that allusion went right over my head.

Please enlighten those of us who are TV/media advertising-deficient...

33 posted on 11/29/2012 6:16:54 AM PST by TXnMA ("Allah": Satan's current alias... "Barack": Allah's current ally...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: TXnMA
Chiffon commercial

Here ya go

34 posted on 11/29/2012 6:38:11 AM PST by Trailerpark Badass (So?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Trailerpark Badass; TXnMA

Thanks. Timeless wisdom many “smartest people in the room” never heed.


35 posted on 11/29/2012 6:53:47 AM PST by DTogo (High time to bring back the Sons of Liberty !!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Trailerpark Badass

LOL! I definitely remember “It’s not nice...” But I guess their ads didn’t work — I didn’t remember they were “Chiffon” (do they still sell that stuff?) ads... ‘-)

Thanks!


36 posted on 11/29/2012 10:31:16 AM PST by TXnMA ("Allah": Satan's current alias... "Barack": Allah's current ally...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: WildHighlander57
"I can’t eat wheat/barley/gluten OR dairy."

I keep eating what I think is a well rounded diet but all I get is "well rounded". My doctor said no dairy. Now, I'm wondering about these other items. I'v got IBS, big-time and my stomach gets so sensitive sometimes, especially when I eat out.

Bummer.

37 posted on 11/29/2012 2:16:17 PM PST by hummingbird
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: hummingbird

About the “rounded”....

I dropped 10 pounds after I quit eating foods containing gluten.

Try cutting out the dairy, plus the wheat/gluten items. Try to keep tabs on what it was that you ate at the restaurant. Ask them if there’s wheat or dairy in the meal you usually get.

Also, I don’t drink fruit juice, just water with meals. On weekends will have a margarita. No beer though, due to the barley.


38 posted on 11/29/2012 2:41:05 PM PST by WildHighlander57 ((WildHighlander57 returning after lurking since 2000))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: hummingbird

Also I don’t drink soda of any type, and avoid sugar as such....

I try to not eat processed food I call it “bare food” no sauces.... wheat and dairy hide in a lot of things :0


39 posted on 11/29/2012 2:48:34 PM PST by WildHighlander57 ((WildHighlander57 returning after lurking since 2000))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: cotton

yes, but what does thiis genetic alteration do to people...the celiac disease came about when thet genetically altered wheat not to produce..and caused it to be smaller plants and to mature quickly..


40 posted on 11/29/2012 2:59:28 PM PST by rxtn41
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Minutemen
Missed this one back in november ~ yes, you are correct, what is wrong here is human DNA. Wheat has not been a universal staple ~ it isn't grown everywhere, and although widely available, it isn't available everywhere.

Not every variety of human can get along with wheat. The number usually tossed out is 1% for Europeans. Many other groups we just don't know about because they don't consume wheat and have no idea what it is. There are other grain allergies. For example 10% of Japanese can't get along with rice!

Then there are Americans! We got everybody here, but not all in equal measure. 3.5% (app) of adult Americans are intolerant of wheat according to the Celiac researchers at University of Maryland. Virtually no black people have that problem, and then there's an equally large number who haven't been studied because they use corn as their primary staple ~ (raises hand).

Part of the reason for the increased level of gluten intolerance arises from the 'founder effect' ~ and we have that in spades. The Scandinavian Sa'ami people appear to have been isolated from the rests of Europe for a good 18,000 years ~ they've become a genetic isolate and they retain many genetic components common in the European Cro-Magnon ancestry that arrived 35,000 years ago.

The Cro-Magnon hunter gatherers, and the Sa'ami up to 1,000 years ago, simply had no contact with wheat. We do know humans have to genetically adapt around a new food like wheat ~ and that's not yet happened with the Sa'ami.

Thanks to the Swedish Empire the Sapma where the Sa'ami live, was almost depopulated as they were shipped to America! Being among the first European settlers in this country they had more time to adapt and spread and become a far larger percentage of the new American nation than would otherwise be expected.

3.5% means there are at least 9,000,000 folks here with the genes for Celiac ~ but not all people with those genes express the disease in their younger years. On the other hand, that means the Sa'ami ~ or part-Sa'ami ~ people in this country are a large minority ethnic group which is virtually invisible due to the large percentage of blonds among them.

41 posted on 04/07/2013 6:18:08 PM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson