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Vitamin D deficiency linked to Type 1 diabetes
Science Codex ^ | November 15, 2012 | NA

Posted on 11/27/2012 11:24:52 AM PST by neverdem

A study led by researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has found a correlation between vitamin D3 serum levels and subsequent incidence of Type 1 diabetes. The six-year study of blood levels of nearly 2,000 individuals suggests a preventive role for vitamin D3 in this disease. The research appears the December issue of Diabetologia, a publication of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD).

"Previous studies proposed the existence of an association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of and Type 1 diabetes, but this is the first time that the theory has been tested in a way that provides the dose-response relationship," said Cedric Garland, DrPH, FACE, professor in UCSD's Department of Family and Preventive Medicine.

This study used samples from millions of blood serum specimens frozen by the Department of Defense Serum Registry for disease surveillance. The researchers thawed and analyzed 1000 samples of serum from healthy people who later developed type 1 diabetes and 1000 healthy controls whose blood was drawn on or near the same date but who did not develop type 1 diabetes. By comparing the serum concentrations of the predominant circulating form of vitamin D – 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) – investigators were able to determine the optimal serum level needed to lower an individual's risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

Based mainly on results of this study, Garland estimates that the level of 25(OH)D needed to prevent half the cases of type 1 diabetes is 50 ng/ml. A consensus of all available data indicates no known risk associated with this dosage.

"While there are a few conditions that influence vitamin D metabolism, for most people, 4000 IU per day of vitamin D3 will be needed to achieve the effective levels," Garland suggested. He urges interested patients to ask their health care provider to measure their serum 25(OH)D before increasing vitamin D3 intake.

"This beneficial effect is present at these intakes only for vitamin D3," cautioned Garland. "Reliance should not be placed on different forms of vitamin D and mega doses should be avoided, as most of the benefits for prevention of disease are for doses less than 10,000 IU/day."

Source: University of California - San Diego


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; Testing
KEYWORDS: diabetes; immunology; type1; type1diabetes; vitamind; vitaminddeficiency
Lower prediagnostic serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration is associated with higher risk of insulin-requiring diabetes: a nested case–control study(PDF)

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25 (OH)D] concentration may increase risk of insulin requiring diabetes.

Methods A nested case–control study was performed using serum collected during 2002–2008 from military service members. One thousand subjects subsequently developed insulin-requiring diabetes. A healthy control was individually matched to each case on blood-draw date (±2 days), age (±3 months), length of service (±30 days) and sex. The median elapsed time between serum collection and first diagnosis of diabetes was 1 year (range 1 month to 10 years). Statistical analysis used matched pairs and conditional logistic regression.

Results ORs(odds ratios) for insulin-requiring diabetes by quintile of serum 25(OH)D, from lowest to highest, were 3.5 (95% CI 2.0, 6.0), 2.5 (1.5, 4.2), 0.8 (0.4, 1.4), 1.1 (0.6, 2.8) and 1.0 (reference) (ptrend <0.001). The quintiles (based on fifths using serum 25(OH)D concentration in the controls) of serum 25(OH)D in nmol/l, were <43 (median 28), 43–59 (median 52), 60–77 (median 70), 78–99 (median 88) and ≥100 (median 128).

Conclusions/interpretation Individuals with lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations had higher risk of insulinrequiring diabetes than those with higher concentrations. A 3.5-fold lower risk was associated with a serum 25 (OH)D concentration ≥60 nmol/l.

P.S. The press release described the serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in terms of ng/ml, i.e. nanograms per milliliter. The original citation expressed it in terms of nmol/l, i.e. nanomoles per liter. The latter is most likely the European convention.

P.P.S. I interpret ptrend <0.001 as the chance of getting these results as just by chance as less than 1 in a 1000 with the same sampling method. Most results are considered statistically significant when you would expect those results by chance less than or equal to 1 out of 20.

1 posted on 11/27/2012 11:25:04 AM PST by neverdem
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To: austinmark; FreedomCalls; IslandJeff; JRochelle; MarMema; Txsleuth; Newtoidaho; texas booster; ...

Diabetes and immunology lists, together again.


2 posted on 11/27/2012 11:34:26 AM PST by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem

And to think for how many years they had us all convinced that more than 400 IU per day would be toxic.


3 posted on 11/27/2012 11:42:37 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: neverdem

Maybe I can get my doctor to prescribe 2 weeks in the sun at a nice beach resort?


4 posted on 11/27/2012 11:46:40 AM PST by rolling_stone
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To: neverdem

Thank you for the ping.

They were wrong about zinc levels as well.


5 posted on 11/27/2012 12:13:37 PM PST by TheOldLady
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To: neverdem
Since we are discussing Type I,
which occurs at an early age,
could it be related to the
mother's levels as well during pregnancy ?

6 posted on 11/27/2012 12:46:44 PM PST by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 119:174 I long for Your salvation, YHvH, Your teaching is my delight.)
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To: TheOldLady
Most FDA and most Common Knowledge about vitamins and nutrition is crap. I went on a Paleo eating plan which includes vegetables, meats, fish, good oils, high fat dairy, fruits and I lost 60lbs in 6 months without feeling hungry at all. I just had a physcial and my doc was amazed at my blood profile. Listen to anything the MSM media or mainstream science says about health and discard it. They tell you avoid the sun, eat lots of whole grains and beans..low fat, low fat low-fat, lots of soy and other vegetarian garbage. You do that an you will almost be guaranteed to be obese, have low energy and die of some form of cancer by your 60’s. Our ancestors were out in the sunlight which converts the cholesterol in our skin to Vitamin D, they ate when they were hungry, had no grains and other poisons in their diet and besides accidents and infections from injury lived robust livs into their 70’s, not on statin drugs with a walker. The FDA is in the business of Big Agra propaganda, since they are one of the largest lobbying group up on the hill. They want to us to keep eating lots of corn based products, breads, potatoes, crackers all made with bad vegtable oils, sugars and chemicals. They keep us sluggish, sick and wanting more of them. Go off carbs for one week and just eat what were were genetically programmed to eat and you see how sick you will feel, like a drug addict. Stay with it and you will come out of a fog, feel like a new person.
7 posted on 11/27/2012 12:57:07 PM PST by pburgh01
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To: pburgh01

Indeed. Twelve years ago, I went from low-fat, soy, high-carb vegetarian (which made me fat and sick) to low-carb, high fat, normal protein and some vitamin supplements. I also lost a bunch of weight, cholesterol went from too high to too low**, LOL, healthy blood work, and my Type II diabetes is under control with diet and exercise.

At the age of 60, I had a cardiac stress test that the doctor told me with an astonished look on his face, “That was a perfectly normal stress test.” I’m almost 66 now, and I can still keep up with Hubby on a hike on the Buckeye Trail. Hubby is just a kid, only 62.

**Too-low blood cholesterol is associated with depression and dementia.


8 posted on 11/27/2012 1:23:40 PM PST by TheOldLady
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To: UriĀ’el-2012
could it be related to the mother's levels as well during pregnancy ?

Good observation. Also, kids don't play outside these days. They don't have recess at school. When we were young, we were on our bikes all the time without full padding or walking to each others' houses without getting molested or just playing in the yard with lawn darts and clackers and we lived to tell about it.

9 posted on 11/27/2012 1:31:21 PM PST by bgill (We've passed the point of no return. Welcome to Al Amerika.)
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To: UriĀ’el-2012
Since we are discussing Type I, which occurs at an early age, could it be related to the mother's levels as well during pregnancy ?

Maybe, but there's also latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, LADA,that also have autoantibodies like classical type 1 diabetics.

Skeletal and extra-skeletal consequences of vitamin D deficiency

Abstract Vitamin D is obtained from cutaneous production when 7-dehydrocholesterol is converted to vitamin D(3) (cholecalciferol) by ultraviolet B radiation or by oral intake of vitamin D. Rickets appeared to have been conquered with vitamin D intake, and many health care professionals thought the major health problems resulting from vitamin D deficiency had been resolved. However, rickets can be considered the tip of the vitamin D deficiency iceberg. In fact, vitamin D deficiency remains common in children and adults. An individual's vitamin D status is best evaluated by measuring the circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D3) concentration. There is increasing agreement that the optimal circulating 25(OH)D3 level should be approximately 30 ng/mL or above. Using this definition, it has been estimated that approximately three-quarters of all adults have low levels. In utero and during childhood, vitamin D deficiency can cause growth retardation and skeletal deformities and may increase the risk of hip fracture later in life. Vitamin D deficiency in adults can exacerbate osteopenia and osteoporosis, cause osteomalacia and muscle weakness, and increase the risk of fracture. More recently, associations between low vitamin D status and increased risk for various non-skeletal morbidities have been recognized; whether all of these associations are causally related to low vitamin D status remains to be determined. The discovery that most tissues and cells in the body have vitamin D receptors and that several possess the enzymatic machinery to convert the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, to the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, has provided new insights into the function of this vitamin. Of great interest is its role in decreasing the risk of many chronic illnesses, including common cancers, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and cardiovascular disease. In this review I consider the nature of vitamin D deficiency, discuss its role in skeletal and non-skeletal health, and suggest strategies for prevention and treatment.

Cells don't make receptors for no reason. That would waste energy.
10 posted on 11/27/2012 2:21:04 PM PST by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: pburgh01

Congrats on the weight loss and good health, but our average ancestor did not live to be 70.


11 posted on 11/27/2012 2:59:47 PM PST by skinndogNN
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To: TheOldLady

At the start of the year, I was very sick. I was hospitalized so weak I could barely walk. Once released I did research and found saturated fat, cholesterol and sea salt is good for you. I did research on it started a web-site dedicated to it. This is one of the articles to illustrate what I found. I am completely well and off all meds. I had high sugar, Hypertension and thyroid. I cured all.
A New Look at Nutrition
By Joan McDaniel
http://coconutcreamcare.com/2012/08/01/a-new-look-at-nutrition/


12 posted on 11/27/2012 3:36:52 PM PST by notomarx
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To: neverdem

I have been taking 5000iu of Vitamin D3-5 daily for five years.

I know it’s just anecdotal, but I have not been sick during that time.

It’s cheap. Buy it at Wally.


13 posted on 11/27/2012 3:58:27 PM PST by upchuck (America's at an awkward stage. Too late to work within the system, too early to shoot the bastards.)
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To: upchuck

What’s your total daily dose, 25,000 IU of vitamin D3?


14 posted on 11/27/2012 4:24:35 PM PST by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem
What’s your total daily dose, 25,000 IU of vitamin D3?

No. That's prolly an overdose :)

I take 5000iu of D3 per day.

15 posted on 11/27/2012 4:48:01 PM PST by upchuck (America's at an awkward stage. Too late to work within the system, too early to shoot the bastards.)
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To: upchuck

Same here...5000 IU Vitamin d3 daily...no cold, no flu, nothing...been that way for years and years.


16 posted on 11/27/2012 5:19:07 PM PST by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: notomarx

That is wonderful that you have had such a miraculous recovery from your illness. God bless and keep you.

I’m so allergic to coconut (and wheat, corn, gluten, and a few other things) that I can’t even take MCT oil. But I am on a proper low-carb diet that keeps me quite healthy.


17 posted on 11/27/2012 5:25:08 PM PST by TheOldLady
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To: upchuck
It's not an overdose.

I started in March on 20,000iu/day with a loading dose of 50,000iu once a week to prevent cluster headaches (the regimen includes other stuff like fish oil, calcium citrate, magnesium, zinc, and some trace stuff like vitamin K and boron).

After being episodic for 12 years and chronic for 8, I have been pain free since April.

I've also heard that even higher doses can bring significant remission for MS patients.

18 posted on 11/27/2012 6:05:16 PM PST by brewcrew
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To: who knows what evil?
Same here...5000 IU Vitamin d3 daily...no cold, no flu, nothing...been that way for years and years.

I saw the Dr. the other day. He was berating me for declining the flu shot. I told him I never get the flu 'cause I take Vit D. He just looked at me. I figure, why tempt fate?

I've had people mock me for taking Vit D. I figure, why argue with success. It works for me.

19 posted on 11/27/2012 7:01:14 PM PST by upchuck (America's at an awkward stage. Too late to work within the system, too early to shoot the bastards.)
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To: TheOldLady

Thank You The Old Lady.
It was Thyroid. I needed Iodine the Doctor was not treating me with anything except synthroid which does nothing. Even with my Throid getting weaker each year I took Vit D3 5,000 mg every day. It kept me going for a long time. I documented about Thryoid and Iodine sources also
“It’s Not In Your Head, It’s In Your Thyroid!”
http://coconutcreamcare.com/2012/07/20/its-not-in-your-head-its-in-your-thyroid/
Natural Food Iodine Sources
http://coconutcreamcare.com/2012/08/21/natural-food-iodine-sources/

I think a lot of people have low thyroid and don’t know it.


20 posted on 11/27/2012 9:30:00 PM PST by notomarx
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To: upchuck

I take Vitamin D too.


21 posted on 11/28/2012 3:30:42 PM PST by TheOldLady
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To: notomarx

I took synthroid for a while, and my blood pressure went up to 200/120. When I stopped taking it, B/P came down, but was never as low again as it had been before taking the drug (100/55).

Right now, it’s 127/70.


22 posted on 11/28/2012 3:51:06 PM PST by TheOldLady
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To: pburgh01

Mostly 90% to 95% of American soy is genetically modified, personally I would be very careful. I know that I will vilified for that statement, somebody please show me the actual non political science that that crap is safe.


23 posted on 11/29/2012 6:40:34 PM PST by acapesket
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To: upchuck

My doctor has me on 4000 of D3 along with the fosomax to rebuild bones. But he said the fosmax could only last for three years — then the possibilities of damage occur.


24 posted on 11/29/2012 6:49:59 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: acapesket

Avoid soy. Too many people are getting allergic to it.


25 posted on 11/29/2012 6:54:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

It’s not an “allergic reaction” per se, merely “deemed as such”.
GMO’s ( not hybridizations!) are poison, there is A difference.


26 posted on 11/29/2012 6:58:56 PM PST by acapesket
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To: acapesket

There are people allergic to soy. A friend of mine had a terrible time with his voice until he discovered the allergy.

Try to find ketchup without soy — can’t.

He finally found a mayonnaise/sald dressing without it.

More medications are coming out with warnings: “Contains wheat, dairy, soy”


27 posted on 11/29/2012 7:16:26 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Oops

salad dressing


28 posted on 11/29/2012 7:17:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Best tasting catsup..365 organic catsup from whole foods, possibly the same folks allergic to soy are also “allergic” to GMO Dairy and GMO wheat...

I am “allergic” to everything!


29 posted on 11/29/2012 8:10:38 PM PST by acapesket
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