Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

To: kabar
Throughout most of our history, immigrants had a higher education level than most Americans.

I seriously doubt this claim.

The massive influx of Irish in the early/mid 19th century was not composed of well-educated professional people, nor the huge numbers of Italian peasants coming in in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Chinese "coolies" of the second half of the 19th were not educated. To quote only three examples.

To be fair, of course, education was not nearly as critical to life success back then.

To address your other issues, it is probable that we assimilated the Jews, Italians and others that came in such huge number pre-WWI is probably because there was a decades-long moratorium on immigration, cutting them off, as you say, from fresh blood. No choice but to assimilate.

But I still firmly believe that the real issue is ideological. Immigrants are taught by our media that "their" culture is one to take pride in, and that "our" culture is one to be ashamed of. Why would anyone want to assimilate from a culture to be proud of into one they would need to be ashamed of?

24 posted on 11/27/2012 1:38:56 PM PST by Sherman Logan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies ]


To: Sherman Logan
I seriously doubt this claim.

Nearly a quarter of American adults had less than five years of schooling in 1910. Only 13% completed high school and 2.7% from college. In 1900, only a little more than 10% of high school age children were actually enrolled in school.

Immigrants who arrived before the 1840s were for the most part similar to the native population, if not superior in education and ambition; they were rarely considered a problem by the native-born population. With the arrival of large numbers of Irish and German Catholics in the two decades before the Civil War, however, immigrants began to be seen as a threat to American society. The number of immigrants tripled between the 1830s and the 1840s, and the country received as many immigrants in the 1850s as in the two previous decades combined. Between 1845 and 1854 immigration increased the American population by 17.6 percent, a much higher rate than in the latter half of the twentieth century.

To address your other issues, it is probable that we assimilated the Jews, Italians and others that came in such huge number pre-WWI is probably because there was a decades-long moratorium on immigration, cutting them off, as you say, from fresh blood. No choice but to assimilate.

There was no decades long moratorium on immigration. We had reduced immigration levels that began in the 1920s that remained in force until 1965.

But I still firmly believe that the real issue is ideological. Immigrants are taught by our media that "their" culture is one to take pride in, and that "our" culture is one to be ashamed of. Why would anyone want to assimilate from a culture to be proud of into one they would need to be ashamed of?

We will agree to disagree. Here is a piece by Professor Huntington dealing with the problems of assimilation as it pertains to Hispanics

27 posted on 11/27/2012 3:19:11 PM PST by kabar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson