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Psoriasis drug may halt or reverse Alzheimer's disease
SmelLASlime ^ | November 27, 2012 | Melissa Healy

Posted on 12/02/2012 10:29:54 PM PST by jwsea55

A biological medication already widely used to treat plaque psoriasis may be able to slow the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found. The same study found that in older mice with established Alzheimer's, this treatment approach, which suppresses the brain's immune reaction to beta amyloid, brought a marked improvement in cognitive function and may even halt or reverse early signs of Alzheimer's.

The new study was published this week in the journal Nature Medicine.

Conducted by researchers in Switzerland and Germany, the study offers a glimmer of hope in the thus-far discouraging search for a therapy that could halt or reverse the inexorable process of neuronal loss and mental decline that affects some 35-million people worldwide. It also strengthens evidence for the long-suspected role of inflammation in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: alzheimer; alzheimers; alzheimertreatment; psoriasisdrug

1 posted on 12/02/2012 10:30:04 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: jwsea55

this psoriasis medicine... is it the one that is $1,000 per injection? With up to 10 needed in a year to clear up psoriasis??


2 posted on 12/02/2012 10:32:54 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL
You are doing DC math. :-))

Check this out:
As a lucky Australian, the feral Govt. has covered the cost of my receiving two recent injections of the new drug STELARA at a cost of Aus $9,250 per injection my contribution was $33.60. Previous I had a PSI score of 29 currently after being on Stelara for 3 months my PSI score is at 11.5, I need to aim for PSI score of 7.5 in order to receive an new prescription for continuation of Stelara as my first script has cost Aus $29,000 (my contribution $100).

3 posted on 12/02/2012 10:39:30 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: jwsea55

Cigarettes can prevent it altogether


4 posted on 12/02/2012 10:51:00 PM PST by Figment
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To: Figment

Alzheimer’s or psoriasis?


5 posted on 12/02/2012 10:54:18 PM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: Figment

Yeah, you die of lung cancer long before you’re old enough to get Alzheimer’s. Fool proof!


6 posted on 12/02/2012 10:57:35 PM PST by Alter Kaker (Gravitation is a theory, not a fact. It should be approached with an open mind...)
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To: Alter Kaker; Figment

My mother is 85, has smoked for about 60 years, does not have any cancers but does have Alzheimer’s. Anything else you two want to add?


7 posted on 12/02/2012 11:03:10 PM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: Alter Kaker

Having dealt with a mother with Alzheimer’s and dealing with a MIL with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, that doesn’t sound like a bad proposition.


8 posted on 12/02/2012 11:09:12 PM PST by tiki
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To: tiki

My heart goes out to you. I understand what you are going through and I would not wish it on any family.


9 posted on 12/03/2012 12:38:38 AM PST by Casie (Chuck Norris 2016)
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To: GeronL

“this psoriasis medicine... is it the one that is $1,000 per injection? With up to 10 needed in a year to clear up psoriasis??”

The FDA will never approve it for this use anyway. Can you imagine the dollars it would take out of the pockets of those health organizations that currently reap the benefits of “treating” those with Alzheimers?


10 posted on 12/03/2012 3:55:58 AM PST by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like it)
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To: GeronL

I suffer from both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis..

my drug is only 700 bucks a shot....

with any luck at all, the deterioration of my joints will stop in it’s tracks...

still hurts like hell though


11 posted on 12/03/2012 4:26:40 AM PST by joe fonebone (The clueless... they walk among us, and they vote...)
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To: tiki; Casie
"Having dealt with a mother with Alzheimer’s and dealing with a MIL with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, that doesn’t sound like a bad proposition."

"My heart goes out to you. I understand what you are going through and I would not wish it on any family."

My mother was VERY firm on her wishes.....when she could no longer live on her own, she was to be put in a nursing home...period. She had had to care for her grandmother who had dementia and didn't want to saddle her children with such a task.

12 posted on 12/03/2012 5:04:19 AM PST by Wonder Warthog
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To: TigersEye
My mother is 85, has smoked for about 60 years, does not have any cancers but does have Alzheimer’s.

My mom died of Alzheimer's disease at 82. She never smoked, drank, became obese, had any cancers, etc. I am quickly coming to the conclusion that whether or not one gets Alzheimer's is a roll of the dice, nothing more.

13 posted on 12/03/2012 6:06:00 AM PST by LSAggie
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To: joe fonebone

I am in the same boat but i dont get the shots yet, still trying to control the arthitis with nsaids. the arthritis hit me when i was about 20, now i have the grip of a 70y/o even though i am half that age.


14 posted on 12/03/2012 7:41:04 AM PST by Docbarleypop
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To: Docbarleypop

unfortunately for me, i am allergic to aspirin and aspirin products...

kinda wipes out the nsaids for me ( i did try celebrex for a while, but it did some bad things to me )


15 posted on 12/03/2012 8:47:08 AM PST by joe fonebone (The clueless... they walk among us, and they vote...)
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To: TigersEye

I have read that smoking and Parkinsons are related...smokers don’t get Parkinsons....interesting thing is my girlfriend and neighbor developed a nasty case of Parkinsons after she quite smoking.. Died within 2 years of quitting...Was a long time smoker (none filtered Camels)

d


16 posted on 12/03/2012 11:05:09 AM PST by goat granny
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To: joe fonebone

Bless you and hope it works for you. I know the pain involved...


17 posted on 12/03/2012 11:07:38 AM PST by goat granny
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To: Casie

Thank you for your sympathy, I actually need it.


18 posted on 12/03/2012 11:16:37 AM PST by tiki
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To: Wonder Warthog

My MIL actually has a Long Term Care policy and my sisters-in-law still wouldn’t let us put her in a home until 2 months ago and now that we have she has lost so much cognitive ability that it is almost impossible and we are having to look for a lock-down facility. They have waiting times of several years around here.

Of course, they weren’t the ones taking care of her and I finally put my foot down and said that we wouldn’t take care of her a day more and they could do it and they changed their minds overnight.


19 posted on 12/03/2012 11:32:45 AM PST by tiki
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To: LSAggie

The latest research is pointing to a genetic connection. (sorry to say that for both of us) A particular genetic configuration leaves one susceptible to degeneration of the myelin sheath (protective covering) on nerve cells in the brain. I have a gut feeling that this is a problem they’re going to find a solution for but I couldn’t put a date on how soon it will happen. I’m sorry you and your mom had to go through that. It’s a nightmare for everyone.


20 posted on 12/03/2012 11:45:23 AM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: goat granny
Smoking Associated With Lower Parkinson's Disease Risk

There have been studies that show a lowered risk up to about 54% but smoking is not a blanket protection from Parkinson's for every smoker. As for quitting and then getting Parkinson's I think that must just be luck of the draw.

FTA: "We also showed that associations did not differ by sex or educational status. Although we found that current smokers and those who had continued to smoke to within five years of Parkinson's disease diagnosis exhibited the lowest risk, a decrease in risk (13 percent to 32 percent) was also observed in those who had quit smoking up to 25 years prior to Parkinson's disease diagnosis."

21 posted on 12/03/2012 12:00:06 PM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: joe fonebone

I hope you get better


22 posted on 12/03/2012 12:04:15 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: jwsea55

whoa/

I hope you at least feel better


23 posted on 12/03/2012 12:07:55 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: TigersEye

Thank you for the link, its interesting,,,,


24 posted on 12/03/2012 12:17:38 PM PST by goat granny
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To: goat granny

You’re welcome. It is interesting and there are other things that tobacco apparently protects from. I have smoked for a long time and have no intention of quitting but I wouldn’t recommend it as a hoped for health measure. The bottom line is; none of us are going to get out of this mess alive! ;^)


25 posted on 12/03/2012 12:25:28 PM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: GeronL
Thanks but I actually clipped that off some other forum to give an idea of cost. I think one of my friends use that drug, though. Side effects are a huge concern with that drug.

He's a doc so he can weigh the pluses and minuses. If he doesn't take the drug, I believe he mentioned he has to worry about inflamation caused by the psoriasis eating at his heart muscle. Otherwise, the psoriasis is more a cosmetic issue. I guess that bothers him a bit, not me in the least. What was MLK great line, "don't judge a man by flaking of his skin but the content of his character."

Taking the drug hits the other organs hard so he does have to monitor stuff like his kidneys and liver.

Hia insurance for a family of 4 is $18k to $20k per year. Argggggh.

26 posted on 12/03/2012 3:50:56 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: jwsea55
What was MLK great line, "don't judge a man by flaking of his skin but the content of his character."

Thanks. I have bad flaky skin... probably psoriasis, I'll probably never see a doctor about it

27 posted on 12/03/2012 3:55:15 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: joe fonebone
You might look into researching beta glucan. Check out Transfer Point. Their product is amazing. I can't recommend other (cheaper) brands. Theirs is the one used in almost all clinical studies and many or most cancer treatment programs.

Order at http://www.beta-glucan.com/ since it is the same product OEMed at a much cheaper price.

The guy who owns the beta-glucan.com is a good guy and would be a good Freeper if he ever visited here. The Transfer Point people are great people as well. Both these companies wouldn't sell you the stuff if they didn't think it would help. There are still some very good business people out there!

If you have questions, call the beta glucan site question number 800-479-5195. Steve should be able to answer almost anything you could throw at him.

28 posted on 12/03/2012 4:24:28 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: TigersEye
The bottom line is; none of us are going to get out of this mess alive! ;^)************

I always add not even Jesus :O)I have been smoking longer than the majority of freepers (or pretty darn close)have been alive. I do think genetics plays a roll in what disease we get...my husband died at 51, his one and only heart attack and 2 of my sons started with bad cardiac problems in their mid fortys....Since their father died so young, I use to nag them to pay attention to their body. Men sometimes ignore little things they shouldn't...THAT INCLUDES ALL YOU MALE FREEPERS...AND YES I AM YELLING AT YOU. GG

29 posted on 12/03/2012 4:51:22 PM PST by goat granny
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To: goat granny

Yes, Ma’am. I will try to pay more attention ... even if I am broke. ;^)


30 posted on 12/03/2012 4:59:17 PM PST by TigersEye (Who is John Galt?)
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To: GeronL
Thanks. I have bad flaky skin... probably psoriasis, I'll probably never see a doctor about it

google "will beta glucan help psoriasis".

Beta glucan is an amazing product. Psoriasis is autoimmune. Beta glucan is an immune supplement that binds with immune cells and does nothing more than "turn on an On Switch" on immune cells that have been turned off.

In a 'normal' immune system, this switch would be 'on', making the cells in their aware state, ready to react to and attack 'foreigners'. In a compromised immune system, there are a whole bunch of immune cells floating around either dormant or attacking something they shouldn't (psoriasis).

There are no 'known' drug interactions or 'counter indicative" reactions. While that is general spiel, some people get upset stomachs (not sure why that would be the case...but who I am to argue if someone says it does). The other major thing is people should not take it if they are on immunosuppressent drugs (i.e., transplants...).

I was allergic (the immune system overreacting to a stimulus) to my dog. This pretty eliminated the problem. Another friend is an 'extremely allergic' person, enough so that he had to go to the ER a few times a year. Started taking BG and hasn't had to visit the ER once in 8 years. As he said once, 'it changed my life'. It also help a mild issue with rheumatoid arthritis I have had since I was a kid. Pretty much keeps the discomfort at bay and preventing the degenerative effects.

I have tried a few brands of BG and can only recommend Transfer Points. Some are just a rip-off. At least one was of such poor quality I had a negative reaction to it. It is definitely worth an hour or so of research. The added benefit. You pretty much will stop getting most of the normal diseases that are floating around...assuming you don't do anything stupid.

Beyond that, if you are good guy, who cares if there are a few flakes.

31 posted on 12/03/2012 7:58:47 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: jwsea55

thanks,I will look into that


32 posted on 12/03/2012 8:03:39 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL
cool. please, let me know how it goes or what you find out.

i think my friend that is doctor (from above, with psoriasis) is finally going to look at after years of me suggesting he should look at it.

i provided some links/info on post 28. and so you aren't shocked, i would expect that your starting dosage would be above 1500mg per day. dosage is based on body weight and condition.

33 posted on 12/03/2012 9:16:30 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: jwsea55

ok

1500 sounds like a lot, I don’t even like taking aspirin


34 posted on 12/03/2012 9:28:06 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL
i pretty much have stayed away from everything but natural supplements for over 20 years. only had a couple of aspirin over that period, so i get where you are coming from...1500mg is three capsules. i think the cancer people may be talking something like 6000mg. if you talk to Steve he could clue you in on it. i take a 1000mg. Transfer Point 100mg capsules are essentially to have a product out against competition. it is too expensive to get real results cost effectively with maintance dosages below 500mg, really 1000mgs for anyone over 120 lbs.

Steve, who owns the beta-glucan.com, was a chemical/environmental engineer. he made descent money fixing big oil companies mishaps. his dad came down with cancer and, if i recall correctly, wasn't expected to live. Steve gave up his job and dedicated his life to help keep his dad a live. after a lot of research he found beta glucan. his dad lived (and i believe is still alive). Steve became a convert. he gave up engineering to promote something he believes will help people.

i used to listen to a few very cutting edge health programs and read a moderate amount on health stuff. i knew about BG before i took it. no big leap of faith for me on that one. a while back i actually researched it, you know the clinical stuff. i was blown away at results BG has in helping treat some pretty severe situations.

at one point i didn't get sick in six years. my girlfriend's family used to laugh and say they could send me into the most toxic bophal. everyone else would be strewn dead on the floor and i would walk out of there ready to enjoy a day at the beach.

...and almost every doctor is clueless about BG. look at the clinical stuff on Transfer Point. they have done a very good job assembling their info, enough so that you can really educate yourself about the efficaciousness and risks/side effects ('no known counter-indications'...tell that to the people who get upset stomachs...for some reason, usually female). my research was done prior to knowing about Transfer Point. the Transfer Point material just added to the depth of my knowledge. the last time i saw their video on macrophages, that was pretty good. but it has been awhile so i don't know what is still up there.

after you have had a chance to let the info sink in, go talk to almost any doctor. it is like something out of South Park. they have been trained to say that it is unsafe. what the duck?! "look at the ducking research." "it raises cholesterol." "no, if you actually read the research, it lowers cholesterol." (BG is not a cost effective way of lowering it...diet, exercise and a couple of other cheap supplements are.) "there are blankty blank side effects." "did you read the ducking research? what research do you have that backs that up? where did you get this info? are you willing to take a look at some other info?" that last question doesn't get answered and the doc now has to go see other patients. convenient.

Marilyn, who owns the TP, is an accountant by trade. like Steve and myself, she stumbled into it and became a convert. She started TP because she believed in it so much.

i would think that you are going to be blown away that such a 'simple' product really is that efficacious. remember, BG doesn't do anything but turn the your immune cells' 'on switch' on. the beneficial results are actually your immune system doing what it is supposed to do. it is sort of bizarre...but think about where some of the misinformation must come from. drug companies? no one can get a patent for BG now. the only patents that can be granted for BG are manufacture process oriented.

maybe i did a bit too much research at one point. hopefully, it can save you some learning curve time.

35 posted on 12/03/2012 11:21:26 PM PST by jwsea55
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