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Illinois poll of Hispanics finds agreement with GOP on guns, gays, abortion
The Daily Caller ^ | 12-4-12 | Alexis Levinson

Posted on 12/04/2012 9:14:05 AM PST by bigbob

As Republicans ponder how to win over Hispanics in future election cycles, there may be a light at the end of the tunnel.

A poll of Illinois Hispanics conducted by pollster Mike McKeon found that a majority shared views generally considered to be sympathetic to the Republican party.

The poll found Hispanics in the conservative camp on social issues in particular. Fifty-one percent said they opposed legalizing gay marriage, compared to just 40 percent who favored legalization. Fifty-six percent called themselves pro-life, while just 33 percent said they were pro-choice.

A small plurality of those surveyed said they did not believe more gun laws would make their communities safer and reduce violence. Forty-seven percent said it would not help. Forty-two percent said it would.

Few identified themselves as liberals — just 14 percent — while 27 percent called themselves conservatives and 59 percent said they were moderates.

Yet when asked for their party identification, 54 percent said they were Democrats, 31 percent said they were independents, and just 15 percent were self-described Republicans. The disparity between ideology and party affiliation could represent an opportunity for Republicans.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailycaller.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Politics/Elections; US: Illinois
KEYWORDS: 2012; 2012polls; banglist; christianvote; conservatism; hispanics; hispanicvote; latinos; mckeon; traditionalvalues
This just proves my point that many voters were either uninformed or intentionally misinformed prior to the last election. I don't fault the Democrats for doing what they do, the blame falls squarely on RNC and GOP elites who failed to get the word (and the vote) out and who failed to present a conservative message.

Hispanics are now different than the rest of traditional Americans who came here to enjoy the blessings of freedom and build a better life for their family. The facts and history are on our side, "we" just did a lousy job of telling the electorate about it.

It's now up to all of us to communicate the message of conservatism as the only way to achieve prosperity and liberty - for all.

This poll just proves that it can be done. Even here in the belly of the beast - IL.

1 posted on 12/04/2012 9:14:13 AM PST by bigbob
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To: bigbob

Yes but they still want the free stuff, lax borders, and amnesty.


2 posted on 12/04/2012 9:18:32 AM PST by Trapped Behind Enemy Lines
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To: bigbob

It’s a train. (the light at the end of the tunnel). Most people fall closer to the GOP on what they believe. However, one of two things keep them from seeing it: their indoctrination by the MSM/Education Complex coupled with peer pressure, or the free gifts.


3 posted on 12/04/2012 9:18:36 AM PST by Ingtar (Everyone complains about the weather, but only Liberals try to legislate it.)
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To: bigbob

And NO AMNESTY.


4 posted on 12/04/2012 9:18:48 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: bigbob

I don’t think it matters. Christians, Catholics, jews, and blacks are all supposedly pro life, but they still vote democrat.

Free crap and skin color trump religion, values and beliefs.

If Christians voted their religious values, no democrat would get elected.


5 posted on 12/04/2012 9:19:25 AM PST by No Socialist
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To: bigbob
Hispanics are able to work their way through impenetrable government paperwork in order to get benefits but we are assured they have been misled by Democratic Party lies.
I don't believe it.
6 posted on 12/04/2012 9:19:48 AM PST by Hans
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To: bigbob

Yet they are written off.

I’ll take a conservative Tex-Mex as friend and neighbor any day over a blue state liberal.


7 posted on 12/04/2012 9:20:49 AM PST by Psalm 144 (Not so "commanding", not so "inevitable".)
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To: Ingtar

It doesn’t help that the public face of the GOP looks like an old mortician’s convention.


8 posted on 12/04/2012 9:22:22 AM PST by Psalm 144 (Not so "commanding", not so "inevitable".)
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To: bigbob

But those are NOT the Nationwide numbers and therein lies our problem.

Hispanics are, quite solidly, socially Liberal. Needless to say, I’m not at all suggesting we “liberal up”. I’m guess I’m saying I don’t know what in the Hell to do. All I know is that the GOP can’t do it.

I did a quick search on the matter and there are legions of polls to prove the point. This was just the first hit:

http://www.aei-ideas.org/2012/11/to-court-the-hispanic-vote-focus-on-more-than-just-immigration/


9 posted on 12/04/2012 9:23:56 AM PST by RIghtwardHo
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To: No Socialist

Agreed. I just don’t get it.


10 posted on 12/04/2012 9:28:45 AM PST by RIghtwardHo
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To: bigbob

“This just proves my point that many voters were either uninformed or intentionally misinformed prior to the last election.”

In multi-racial societies people vote their race & to a degree their religion. Not liberty, values or even economic interests. They see the Democrats as the party of non-Whites. The only way Republicans will gain a majority of that vote is to become anti-White also.


11 posted on 12/04/2012 9:36:49 AM PST by DwFry (Baby Boomers Killed Western Civilization!)
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To: Psalm 144

Thanks for proving the point I made above. This is why I’ve left the party.

There is no party in the USA that proudly represents the interests of White people. Every race but mine has someone in their corner. Only mine gets scorn.

That being said, the reason you see so many White men on the Republican ticket is because it was primarily White men who carved roads from wilderness, build hospitals, gave the country electricity, indoor plumbing, freed the slaves & defeated the Nazis.

If you’re ashamed of it join the opposition who have accomplished NOTHING even close.


12 posted on 12/04/2012 9:42:39 AM PST by DwFry (Baby Boomers Killed Western Civilization!)
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To: bigbob

Just a slightly different twist on what Karl Rove and the Bushes and others have been peddling concerning Latinos for years. And it’s just as big as loser now as it has been in the past.

Most members of some groups just want big government and the many government programs they can benefit from. Others who don’t need the programs favor them because they think it makes them compassionate and concerned about the poor.

These folks want more government handouts and they want more of their kind to come to the US to increase their political power. All these other matters are a very distant second, and Republicans need to stop kidding themselves about it.


13 posted on 12/04/2012 9:43:42 AM PST by Will88
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To: Will88

Just the fact that someone wants to carve out a group for identity politics is enough to make me suspicious.


14 posted on 12/04/2012 9:46:29 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: DwFry

Great post.


15 posted on 12/04/2012 9:51:39 AM PST by Nea Wood (When life gets too hard to stand, kneel.)
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To: RIghtwardHo

I don’t claim to understand it either, but I think the problem is different if the issue is overcoming negative media and public image, as this suggests. With enough money, we can win that battle.

Some people including many on FR are ready to just throw in the towel and say screwit, they won the country’s done for. I’m not made that way...

Instead I look for reasons and figure what we do next. And I see this article as encouraging in that focusing on bringing the message of conservatism to Hispanics (NOT chaning the message, not pandering, not offering anmensty or anything like that) - could show the error of their voting and bring them over to our side.


16 posted on 12/04/2012 9:51:58 AM PST by bigbob
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To: bigbob

Too little, too late. The U.S. is heading towards long-term third world socialism, and amnesty for illegal immigrants will make sure that U.S. conservatism NEVER becomes a political belief of the majority of U.S. voters. The majority of present U.S. voters are “takers”, anyways, and government dependence and drug dependence have way too much in common.


17 posted on 12/04/2012 9:52:34 AM PST by johnthebaptistmoore (The world continues to be stuck in a "all leftist, all of the time" funk. BUNK THE FUNK!)
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To: No Socialist
If Christians voted their religious values, no democrat would get elected.

Exactly what I have been saying (but not as concisely), Obama/Romney are just a symptom of the problem. The real problem is the voters. The so called Christian voters who no longer believe or only partially believe, or only believe when faced with their own mortality.

Bottom line, the voters will answer the surveys one way and vote ( and live) another.

All of the profusion of competing Christian groups and sub groups have diluted and confused the message. You can shop for a church that believes anything from black liberation to white supremacy to drinking Koolaid in the jungle.
The legitimate Christian leaders need to get together and address this problem. They have sheep wandering everywhere.

18 posted on 12/04/2012 9:52:56 AM PST by oldbrowser (Put Obama in check, now.)
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To: No Socialist

Quite the conundrum. I baffles me to no end. As well as anyone making a higher middle class income but I am always set back by the Nobama stickers (and the lame Coexistones) on cars carrying obvious affluent middle classers. I guess the fact the sticker is on the paint of the car explain IQ level.


19 posted on 12/04/2012 9:54:05 AM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: DwFry

screw the brown people. All they think of is themselves. Other than gov’t confiscated money, they will NEVER get a voluntary dime of support from me....AGAIN!


20 posted on 12/04/2012 9:54:28 AM PST by Josa
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To: DwFry
Bravo here you go: Things invented by white guys: 20th century: # 1900: Rigid dirigible airship: Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin # 1901: Improved wireless transmitter: Reginald Fessenden # 1901: Mercury vapor lamp: Peter C. Hewitt # 1901: paperclip: Johan Vaaler # 1902: Radio magnetic detector: Guglielmo Marconi # 1902: Radio telephone: Poulsen Reginald Fessenden # 1902: Rayon cellulose ester: Arthur D. Little # 1903: Electrocardiograph (EKG): Willem Einthoven # 1903: Powered Monoplane: Richard Pearse # 1903: Powered Airplane: Wilbur Wright and Orville Wright # 1903: Bottle machine: Michael Owens # 1904: Thermionic valve: John Ambrose Fleming # 1904: Separable Attachment Plug: Harvey Hubbell # 1905: Radio tube diode: John Ambrose Fleming # 1906: Triode amplifier: Lee DeForest # 1907: Radio amplifier: Lee DeForest # 1907: Radio tube triode: Lee DeForest # 1907: Vacuum cleaner, (electric): James Spangler # 1909: Monoplane: Henry W. Walden # 1909: Bakelite: Leo Baekeland # 1909: Gun silencer: Hiram Percy Maxim # 1910: Thermojet engine: Henri Coandă # 1911: Gyrocompass: Elmer A. Sperry # 1911: Automobile self starter (perfected): Charles F. Kettering # 1911: Air conditioner: Willis Haviland Carrier # 1911: Cellophane: Jacques Brandenburger # 1911: Hydroplane: Glenn Curtiss # 1912: photography ;Lapse-time camera for use with plants:Arthur C. Pillsbury # 1912: Regenerative radio circuit: Edwin H. Armstrong # 1913: Crossword puzzle: Arthur Wynne # 1913: Improved X-Ray: William D. Coolidge # 1913: Double acting wrench: Robert Owen # 1913: Cracking process for Gasoline: William M. Burten # 1913: Gyroscope stabilizer: Elmer A. Sperry # 1913: Geiger counter: Hans Geiger # 1913: Radio receiver, cascade tuning: Ernst Alexanderson # 1913: Radio receiver, heterodyne: Reginald Fessenden # 1913: Stainless steel: Harry Brearley # 1914: Radio transmitter triode mod.: Ernst Alexanderson # 1914: Liquid fuel rocket: Robert Goddard # 1914: Tank, military: Ernest Dunlop Swinton # 1915: Tungsten Filament: Irving Langmuir # 1915: Searchlight arc: Elmer A. Sperry # 1915: Radio tube oscillator: Lee DeForest # 1916: Browning Gun: John Browning # 1916: Thompson submachine gun: John T. Thompson # 1916: Incandescent gas lamp: Irving Langmuir # 1917: Sonar echolocation: Paul Langevin # 1918: Super heterodyne: Edwin H. Armstrong # 1918: Interrupter gear: Anton Fokker # 1918: Radio crystal oscillator: A.M. Nicolson # 1918: Pop-up toaster: Charles Strite # 1919: the Theremin: Leon Theremin # 1922: Radar: Robert Watson-Watt, A. H. Taylor, L. C. Young, Gregory Breit, Merle Antony Tuve # 1922: Technicolor: Herbert T. Kalmus # 1922: Water skiing: Ralph Samuelson # 1922: Photography : First mass production photo machine:Arthur C. Pillsbury # 1923: Arc tube: Ernst Alexanderson # 1923: Sound film: Lee DeForest # 1923: Television Electronic: Philo Farnsworth # 1923: Wind tunnel: Max Munk # 1923: Autogyro: Juan de la Cierva # 1923: Xenon flash lamp: Harold Edgerton # 1925: ultra-centrifuge: Theodor Svedberg - used to determine molecular weights # 1925: Television Iconoscope: Vladimir Zworykin # 1925: Television Nipkow System: C. Francis Jenkins # 1925: Telephoto: C. Francis Jenkins # 1926: Television Mechanical Scanner: John Logie Baird # 1926: Aerosol spray: Rotheim # 1927: Mechanical cotton picker: John Rust # 1927: Photography:First microscopic motion picture camera: Arthur C. Pillsbury # 1928: sliced bread: Otto Frederick Rohwedder # 1928: Electric dry shaver: Jacob Schick # 1928: Antibiotics: Alexander Fleming # 1929: Electroencephelograph (EEG): Hans Berger # 1929: Photography:First X-Ray motion picture camera:Arthur C. Pillsbury # 1920s: Mechanical potato peeler: Herman Lay # 1930: Neoprene: Wallace Carothers # 1930: Nylon: Wallace Carothers # 1930: Photography: Underwater Motion Picture Camera: Arthur C. Pillsbury # 1931: the Radio telescope: Karl Jansky Grote Reber # 1932: Polaroid glass: Edwin H. Land # 1935: microwave radar: Robert Watson-Watt # 1935: Trampoline: George Nissen and Larry Griswold # 1935: Spectrophotometer: Arthur C. Hardy # 1935: Casein fiber: Earl Whittier Stephen # 1935: Hammond Organ: Laurens Hammond # 1936: Pinsetter (bowling): Gottfried Schmidt # 1937: Jet engine: Frank Whittle Hans von Ohain # 1938: Fiberglass: Russell Games Slayter John H. Thomas # 1938: Computer: Konrad Zuse (Germany) simultaneously as Atanasoff (United States) # 1939: FM radio: Edwin H. Armstrong # 1939: Helicopter: Igor Sikorsky # 1939: View-master: William Gruber # 1942: Bazooka Rocket Gun: Leslie A. Skinner C. N. Hickman # 1942: Undersea oil pipeline: Hartley, Anglo-Iranian, Siemens in Operation Pluto # 1943: Aqua-Lung: Jacques-Yves Cousteau and Emile Gagnan # 1943: electronic programmable digital computer: Tommy Flowers [1] # 1944: Electron spectrometer: Deutsch Elliot Evans # 1945: Nuclear weapons (but note: chain reaction theory: 1933) # 1946: microwave oven: Percy Spencer # 1947: Transistor: William Shockley, Walter Brattain, John Bardeen # 1947: Polaroid camera: Edwin Land # 1948: Long Playing Record: Peter Carl Goldmark # 1949: Atomic clocks # 1952: fusion bomb: Edward Teller and Stanislaw Ulam # 1952: hovercraft: Christopher Cockerell # 1953: maser: Charles Townes # 1953: medical ultrasonography # 1954: transistor radio (dated from the from Regency TR1) (USA) # 1954: first nuclear power reactor # 1954: geodesic dome: Buckminster Fuller # 1955: Velcro: George de Mestral # 1957: Jet Boat: William Hamilton # 1957: EEG topography: Walter Grey Walter # 1957: Bubble Wrap - Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes of Sealed Air # 1958: the Integrated circuit: Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments, Robert Noyce at Fairchild Semiconductor # 1959: snowmobile: Joseph-Armand Bombardier # 1960s: Packet switching: Donald Davies and Paul Baran, video games # 1960: lasers: Theodore Maiman, at Hughes Aircraft # 1962: Communications satellites: Arthur C. Clarke # 1962: Light-emitting diode: Nick Holonyak # 1963: Hypertext: Ted Nelson # 1963: Computer mouse: Douglas Engelbart # 1965: 8-track tapes: William Powell Lear # 1968: Video game console: Ralph Baer # 1970: Fiber optics # 1971: E-mail: Ray Tomlinson # 1971: the Microprocessor # 1971: the Pocket calculator # 1971: Magnetic resonance imaging: Raymond V. Damadian # 1972: Computed Tomography: Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield # 1973: Ethernet: Bob Metcalfe and David Boggs # 1973: Monash University scientists report the world's first IVF pregnancy. # 1974: Scramjet: NASA and United States Navy -- first operational prototype flown in 2002 # 1974: Heimlich Maneuever: Henry Heimlich # 1975: digital camera: Steven Sasson # 1977: the personal computer (dated from Commodore PET) # 1978: Philips releases the laserdisc player # 1978: Spring loaded camming device: Ray Jardine # 1979: the Walkman: Akio Morita, Masaru Ibuka, Kozo Ohsone # 1979: the cellular telephone (first commercially fielded version, NTT) # 1970s: Tomahawk Cruise Missile (first computerized cruise missile) # 1983: Domain Name System: Paul Mockapetris # 1985: polymerase chain reaction: Kary Mullis # 1985: DNA fingerprinting: Alec Jeffreys # 1989: the World Wide Web: Tim Berners-Lee 19th century # 1800: Electric battery: Alessandro Volta # 1801: Jacquard loom: Joseph Marie Jacquard # 1802: Screw propeller steamboat Phoenix: John Stevens # 1802: gas stove: Zachäus Andreas Winzler # 1805: Submarine Nautilus: Robert Fulton # 1805: Refrigerator: Oliver Evans # 1807: Steamboat Clermont: Robert Fulton # 1808: Band saw: William Newberry # 1811: Gun- Breechloader: Thornton (?) # 1812: Metronome: Dietrich Nikolaus Winkel # 1813: Hand printing press: George Clymer # 1814: Steam Locomotive (Blucher): George Stephenson # 1816: Miner's safety lamp: Humphry Davy # 1816: Metronome: Johann Nepomuk Maelzel (reputed) # 1816: Stirling engine: Robert Stirling # 1816: Stethoscope: Rene Theophile Hyacinthe Laennec # 1817: Kaleidoscope: David Brewster # 1819: Breech loading flintlock: John Hall # 1821: Electric motor: Michael Faraday # 1823: Electromagnet: William Sturgeon # 1826: Photography: Joseph Nicéphore Niépce # 1826: internal combustion engine: Samuel Morey # 1827: Insulated wire: Joseph Henry # 1827: Screw propeller: Josef Ressel # 1827: Friction match: John Walker # 1830: Lawn mower: Edwin Beard Budding # 1831: Multiple coil magnet: Joseph Henry # 1831: Magnetic acoustic telegraph: Joseph Henry (patented 1837) # 1831: Reaper: Cyrus McCormick # 1831: Electrical generator: Michael Faraday, Stefan Jedlik # 1834: June 14 - Isaac Fischer, Jr. patents sandpaper # 1834: The Hansom cab is patented # 1834: Louis Braille perfects his Braille system # 1835: Photogenic Drawing: William Henry Fox Talbot # 1835: Revolver: Samuel Colt # 1835: Morse code: Samuel Morse # 1835: Electromechanical Relay: Joseph Henry # 1836: Samuel Colt receives a patent for the Colt revolver (February 24) # 1836: Improved screw propeller: John Ericsson # 1836: Sewing machine: Josef Madersberger # 1837: Photography: Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre # 1837: First US electric printing press patented by Thomas Davenport (February 25) # 1837: Steel plow: John Deere # 1837: Standard diving dress: Augustus Siebe # 1837: Camera Zoom Lens: Jozef Maximilián Petzval # 1838: Electric telegraph: Charles Wheatstone # 1838: Forerunner of Morse code: Alfred Vail # 1838: closed diving suit with a helmet: Augustus Siebe # 1839: Vulcanization of rubber: Charles Goodyear # 1840: Frigate with submarine machinery SS Princeton: John Ericsson # 1840: artificial fertilizer: Justus von Liebig # 1842: Anaesthesia: Crawford Long # 1843: Typewriter: Charles Thurber # 1843: Fax machine: Alexander Bain # # 1844: Telegraph: Samuel Morse # 1845: Portland cement: William Aspdin # 1845: Double tube tire: Robert Thomson (inventor) # 1846: Sewing machine: Elias Howe # 1846: Rotary printing press: Richard M. Hoe # 1849: Safety pin: Walter Hunt # 1849: Francis turbine: James B. Francis # 1852: Airship: Henri Giffard # 1852: Passenger elevator: Elisha Otis # 1852: Gyroscope: Léon Foucault # 1853: Glider: Sir George Cayley # 1855: Bunsen burner: Robert Bunsen # 1855: Bessemer process: Henry Bessemer # 1856: First celluloids: Alexander Parkes # 1858: Undersea telegraph cable: Fredrick Newton Gisborne # 1858: Shoe sole sewing machine: Lyman R. Blake # 1858: Mason jar: John L. Mason # 1859: Oil drill: Edwin L. Drake # 1860: Linoleum: Fredrick Walton # 1860: Repeating rifle: Oliver F. Winchester, Christopher Spencer # 1860: Self-propelled torpedo: Ivan Lupis-Vukić # 1861: Ironclad USS Monitor: John Ericsson # 1861: Regenerative Furnace: Carl Wilhelm Siemens # 1862: Revolving machine gun: Richard J. Gatling # 1862: Mechanical submarine: Narcís Monturiol i Estarriol # 1862: Pasteurization: Louis Pasteur, Claude Bernard # 1863: Player piano: Henri Fourneaux # 1864: First concept typewriter: Peter Mitterhofer # 1865: Compression ice machine: Thaddeus Lowe # 1866: Dynamite: Alfred Nobel # 1867: # 1868: First practical typewriter: Christopher Sholes, Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule, with assistance from James Densmore # 1868: Air brake (rail): George Westinghouse # 1868: Oleomargarine: Mege Mouries # 1869: Vacuum cleaner: I.W. McGaffers # 1870: Magic Lantern projector: Henry R. Heyl # 1870: Stock ticker: Thomas Alva Edison # 1870: Mobile Gasoline Engine, Automobile: Siegfried Marcus # 1871: Cable car (railway): Andrew S. Hallidie # 1871: Compressed air rock drill: Simon Ingersoll # 1872: Celluloid (later development): John W. Hyatt # 1872: Adding machine: Edmund D. Barbour # 1873: Barbed wire: Joseph F. Glidden # 1873: Railway knuckle coupler: Eli H. Janney # 1873: Modern direct current electric motor: Zénobe Gramme # 1874: Electric street car: Stephen Dudle Field # 1875: Dynamo: William A. Anthony # 1875: Gun- (magazine): Benjamin B. Hotchkiss # 1876: Telephone: Alexander Graham Bell # 1876: Telephone: Elisha Gray # 1876: Carpet sweeper: Melville Bissell # 1876: Gasoline carburettor: Daimler # 1877: Stapler: Henry R. Heyl # 1877: Induction motor: Nikola Tesla # 1877: Phonograph: Thomas Alva Edison # 1877: Electric welding: Elihu Thomson # 1877: Twine Knotter: John Appleby # 1878: Cathode ray tube: William Crookes # 1878: Transparent film: Eastman Goodwin # 1878: Rebreather: Henry Fleuss # 1878: Incandescent Light bulb: Joseph Swan # 1879: Pelton turbine: Lester Pelton # 1879: Automobile engine: Karl Benz # 1879: Cash register: James Ritty # 1879: Automobile (Patent): George B. Seldon ... note did NOT invent auto # 1880: Photophone: Alexander Graham Bell # 1880: Roll film: George Eastman # 1880: Safety razor: Kampfe Brothers # 1880: Seismograph: John Milne # 1881: Electric welding machine: Elihu Thomson # 1881: Metal detector: Alexander Graham Bell # 1882: Electric fan: Schuyler Skatts Wheeler # 1882: Electric flat iron: Henry W. Seely # 1883: Auto engine - compression ignition: Gottlieb Daimler # 1883: two-phase (alternating current) induction motor: Nikola Tesla # 1884: Linotype machine: Ottmar Mergenthaler # 1884: Fountain pen: Lewis Waterman NB: Did not invent fountain pen, nor even "first practical fountain pen". Started manufacture in 1883, too. # 1884: Punched card accounting: Herman Hollerith # 1884: Trolley car, (electric): Frank Sprague, Karel Van de Poele # 1885: Automobile, differential gear: Karl Benz # 1885: Maxim gun: Hiram Stevens Maxim # 1885: Motor cycle: Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach # 1885: Alternating current transformer: William Stanley # 1886: Gasoline engine: Gottlieb Daimler # 1886: Improved phonograph cylinder: Tainter & Bell # 1887: Monotype machine: Tolbert Lanston # 1887: Contact lens: Adolf E. Fick, Eugene Kalt and August Muller # 1887: Gramophone record: Emile Berliner # 1887: Automobile, (gasoline): Gottlieb Daimler # 1888: Polyphase AC Electric power system: Nikola Tesla (30 related patents.) # 1888: Kodak hand camera: George Eastman # 1888: Ballpoint pen: John Loud # 1888: Pneumatic tube tire: John Boyd Dunlop # 1888: Harvester-thresher: Matteson (?) # 1888: Kinematograph: Augustin Le Prince # 1889: Automobile, (steam): Sylvester Roper # 1890: Pneumatic Hammer: Charles B. King # 1891: Automobile Storage Battery: William Morrison # 1891: Zipper: Whitcomb L. Judson # 1891: Carborundum: Edward G. Acheson # 1892: Color photography: Frederic E. Ives # 1892: Automatic telephone exchange (electromechanical): Almon Strowger - First in commercial service. # 1893: Photographic gun: E.J. Marcy # 1893: Half tone engraving: Frederick Ives # 1893: Wireless communication: Nikola Tesla # 1895: Phatoptiken projector: Woodville Latham # 1895: Phantascope: C. Francis Jenkins # 1895: Disposable blades: King C. Gillette # 1895: Diesel engine: Rudolf Diesel # 1895: Radio signals: Guglielmo Marconi # 1895: Shredded Wheat: Henry Perky # 1896: Vitascope: Thomas Armat # 1896: Steam turbine: Charles Curtis # 1896: Electric stove: William S. Hadaway # 1897: Automobile, magneto: Robert Bosch # 1898: Remote control: Nikola Tesla # 1899: Automobile self starter: Clyde J. Coleman # 1899: Magnetic tape recorder: Valdemar Poulsen # 1899: Gas turbine: Charles Curtis 18th cent. # 1701: Seed drill: Jethro Tull # 1705: Steam piston engine: Thomas Newcomen # 1709: Piano: Bartolomeo Cristofori # 1710: Thermometer: René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur # 1711: Tuning fork: John Shore # 1714: Mercury thermometer: Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit # 1730: Mariner's quadrant: Thomas Godfrey # 1731: Sextant: John Hadley # 1733: Flying shuttle: John Kay (Flying Shuttle) # 1742: Franklin stove: Benjamin Franklin # 1750: Flatboat: Jacob Yoder # 1752: Lightning rod: Benjamin Franklin # 1762: Iron smelting process: Jared Eliot # 1767: Spinning jenny: James Hargreaves # 1767: Carbonated water: Joseph Priestley # 1769: Steam engine: James Watt # 1769: Water Frame: Richard Arkwright # 1775: Submarine Turtle: David Bushnell # 1777: Card teeth making machine: Oliver Evans # 1777: Circular saw: Samuel Miller # 1779: Spinning mule: Samuel Crompton # 1783: Multitubular boiler engine: John Stevens # 1783: Parachute: Jean Pierre Blanchard # 1783: Hot air balloon: Montgolfier brothers # 1784: Bifocals: Benjamin Franklin # 1784: Shrapnel shell: Henry Shrapnel # 1785: Power loom: Edmund Cartwright # 1785: Automatic flour mill: Oliver Evans # 1787: Non-condensing high pressure Engine: Oliver Evans # 1790: Cut and head nail machine: Jacob Perkins # 1791: Steamboat: John Fitch # 1791: Artificial teeth: Nicholas Dubois De Chemant # 1793: Cotton gin: Eli Whitney # 1793: Optical telegraph: Claude Chappe # 1797: Cast iron plow: Charles Newbold # 1798: Vaccination: Edward Jenner # 1798: Lithography: Alois Senefelder # 1799: Seeding machine: Eliakim Spooner 17th century * 1608: Telescope: Hans Lippershey * 1609: Microscope: Galileo Galilei * 1620: Slide rule: William Oughtred * 1623: Automatic calculator: Wilhelm Schickard * 1642: Adding machine: Blaise Pascal * 1643: Barometer: Evangelista Torricelli * 1645: Vacuum pump: Otto von Guericke * 1657: Pendulum clock: Christiaan Huygens * 1698: Steam engine: Thomas Savery
21 posted on 12/04/2012 9:55:29 AM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: No Socialist
I don’t think it matters. Christians, Catholics, jews, and blacks are all supposedly pro life, but they still vote democrat.

That should be reworded, non-Catholic Christians as a total (since you used both words Christian and Catholic), do not vote democrat, the majority of the Protestant vote only went democrat in 1932, 1936, and 1964.

22 posted on 12/04/2012 9:55:29 AM PST by ansel12 (The only Senate seat GOP pick up was the Palin endorsed Deb Fischer's successful run in Nebraska)
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To: oldbrowser
They have sheep wandering everywhere.

LOL funny and sad all at once.
23 posted on 12/04/2012 9:55:29 AM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Resolute Conservative

Aw crapola, maybe one could invent a universal text formatter :)


24 posted on 12/04/2012 9:56:43 AM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: No Socialist

PRACTICING non-Hispanic Catholics voted overwhelmingly for McCain in 2008 and even more so for Romney last November.

Practicing non-Hispanic Catholics now vote almost reliably GOP as white evangelicals and LDS members.


25 posted on 12/04/2012 9:57:58 AM PST by Trapped Behind Enemy Lines
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To: bigbob

Doesn’t matter. The Hispanics don’t vote based on “guns, gays, and abortion.” They vote for “FREE STUFF!” And we can’t outbid the Democrats.


26 posted on 12/04/2012 10:04:44 AM PST by Little Ray (Get back to work. Your urban masters need their EBTs refilled.)
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To: Little Ray
Doesn’t matter. The Hispanics don’t vote based on “guns, gays, and abortion.” They vote for “FREE STUFF!” And we can’t outbid the Democrats.

You got that correct! It's just about all over!

27 posted on 12/04/2012 10:06:54 AM PST by timestax (Why not drug tests for the President AND all White Hut staff ? ? ?)
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To: Psalm 144
I’ll take a conservative Tex-Mex as friend and neighbor any day over a blue state liberal.

Same here, and the same for my old Texas redneck, black friends.

This poll shows what I keep trying to tell the prissy republican types, if you want to win minorities, especially Hispanics, then talk to them like men, and talk to them about social issues, what I call "bar talk". Let them know how liberals are both effeminate and against God, they are the prissy losers, not the gun owning, bible toting, stand up to gangsters, conservatives.

28 posted on 12/04/2012 10:07:21 AM PST by ansel12 (The only Senate seat GOP pick up was the Palin endorsed Deb Fischer's successful run in Nebraska)
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To: bigbob

We can’t have the benefits of a Christian nation without being Christian.

Pray for revival.


29 posted on 12/04/2012 10:10:32 AM PST by donna (Pray for revival.)
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To: bigbob

Sorry, but polls no longer have any credibility with me. Agree or disagree with the results, I just don’t trust them any more.


30 posted on 12/04/2012 10:10:37 AM PST by clintonh8r (Happy to be represented by Lt. Col. Allen West)
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To: Resolute Conservative
Bravo here you go: Things invented by white guys: 20th century:

# 1900: Rigid dirigible airship: Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin
# 1901: Improved wireless transmitter: Reginald Fessenden
# 1901: Mercury vapor lamp: Peter C. Hewitt
# 1901: paperclip: Johan Vaaler
# 1902: Radio magnetic detector: Guglielmo Marconi
# 1902: Radio telephone: Poulsen Reginald Fessenden
# 1902: Rayon cellulose ester: Arthur D. Little
# 1903: Electrocardiograph (EKG): Willem Einthoven
# 1903: Powered Monoplane: Richard Pearse
# 1903: Powered Airplane: Wilbur Wright and Orville Wright
# 1903: Bottle machine: Michael Owens
# 1904: Thermionic valve: John Ambrose Fleming
# 1904: Separable Attachment Plug: Harvey Hubbell
# 1905: Radio tube diode: John Ambrose Fleming # 1906: Triode amplifier: Lee DeForest
# 1907: Radio amplifier: Lee DeForest
# 1907: Radio tube triode: Lee DeForest
# 1907: Vacuum cleaner, (electric): James Spangler
# 1909: Monoplane: Henry W. Walden
# 1909: Bakelite: Leo Baekeland
# 1909: Gun silencer: Hiram Percy Maxim
# 1910: Thermojet engine: Henri Coandă
# 1911: Gyrocompass: Elmer A. Sperry
# 1911: Automobile self starter (perfected): Charles F. Kettering
# 1911: Air conditioner: Willis Haviland Carrier
# 1911: Cellophane: Jacques Brandenburger
# 1911: Hydroplane: Glenn Curtiss
# 1912: photography ;Lapse-time camera for use with plants:Arthur C. Pillsbury
# 1912: Regenerative radio circuit: Edwin H. Armstrong
# 1913: Crossword puzzle: Arthur Wynne
# 1913: Improved X-Ray: William D. Coolidge
# 1913: Double acting wrench: Robert Owen
# 1913: Cracking process for Gasoline: William M. Burten
# 1913: Gyroscope stabilizer: Elmer A. Sperry
# 1913: Geiger counter: Hans Geiger
# 1913: Radio receiver, cascade tuning: Ernst Alexanderson
# 1913: Radio receiver, heterodyne: Reginald Fessenden
# 1913: Stainless steel: Harry Brearley
# 1914: Radio transmitter triode mod.: Ernst Alexanderson
# 1914: Liquid fuel rocket: Robert Goddard
# 1914: Tank, military: Ernest Dunlop Swinton
# 1915: Tungsten Filament: Irving Langmuir
# 1915: Searchlight arc: Elmer A. Sperry
# 1915: Radio tube oscillator: Lee DeForest
# 1916: Browning Gun: John Browning
# 1916: Thompson submachine gun: John T. Thompson
# 1916: Incandescent gas lamp: Irving Langmuir
# 1917: Sonar echolocation: Paul Langevin
# 1918: Super heterodyne: Edwin H. Armstrong
# 1918: Interrupter gear: Anton Fokker
# 1918: Radio crystal oscillator: A.M. Nicolson
# 1918: Pop-up toaster: Charles Strite
# 1919: the Theremin: Leon Theremin
# 1922: Radar: Robert Watson-Watt, A. H. Taylor, L. C. Young, Gregory Breit, Merle Antony Tuve
# 1922: Technicolor: Herbert T. Kalmus
# 1922: Water skiing: Ralph Samuelson
# 1922: Photography : First mass production photo machine:Arthur C. Pillsbury
# 1923: Arc tube: Ernst Alexanderson
# 1923: Sound film: Lee DeForest
# 1923: Television Electronic: Philo Farnsworth
# 1923: Wind tunnel: Max Munk
# 1923: Autogyro: Juan de la Cierva
# 1923: Xenon flash lamp: Harold Edgerton
# 1925: ultra-centrifuge: Theodor Svedberg - used to determine molecular weights
# 1925: Television Iconoscope: Vladimir Zworykin
# 1925: Television Nipkow System: C. Francis Jenkins
# 1925: Telephoto: C. Francis Jenkins
# 1926: Television Mechanical Scanner: John Logie Baird # 1926: Aerosol spray: Rotheim
# 1927: Mechanical cotton picker: John Rust
# 1927: Photography:First microscopic motion picture camera: Arthur C. Pillsbury
# 1928: sliced bread: Otto Frederick Rohwedder
# 1928: Electric dry shaver: Jacob Schick
# 1928: Antibiotics: Alexander Fleming
# 1929: Electroencephelograph (EEG): Hans Berger
# 1929: Photography:First X-Ray motion picture camera:Arthur C. Pillsbury
# 1920s: Mechanical potato peeler: Herman Lay
# 1930: Neoprene: Wallace Carothers
# 1930: Nylon: Wallace Carothers
# 1930: Photography: Underwater Motion Picture Camera: Arthur C. Pillsbury
# 1931: the Radio telescope: Karl Jansky Grote Reber
# 1932: Polaroid glass: Edwin H. Land
# 1935: microwave radar: Robert Watson-Watt
# 1935: Trampoline: George Nissen and Larry Griswold
# 1935: Spectrophotometer: Arthur C. Hardy
# 1935: Casein fiber: Earl Whittier Stephen # 1935: Hammond Organ: Laurens Hammond
# 1936: Pinsetter (bowling): Gottfried Schmidt
# 1937: Jet engine: Frank Whittle Hans von Ohain
# 1938: Fiberglass: Russell Games Slayter John H. Thomas
# 1938: Computer: Konrad Zuse (Germany) simultaneously as Atanasoff (United States)
# 1939: FM radio: Edwin H. Armstrong
# 1939: Helicopter: Igor Sikorsky
# 1939: View-master: William Gruber
# 1942: Bazooka Rocket Gun: Leslie A. Skinner C. N. Hickman
# 1942: Undersea oil pipeline: Hartley, Anglo-Iranian, Siemens in Operation Pluto
# 1943: Aqua-Lung: Jacques-Yves Cousteau and Emile Gagnan
# 1943: electronic programmable digital computer: Tommy Flowers [1]
# 1944: Electron spectrometer: Deutsch Elliot Evans
# 1945: Nuclear weapons (but note: chain reaction theory: 1933)
# 1946: microwave oven: Percy Spencer
# 1947: Transistor: William Shockley, Walter Brattain, John Bardeen
# 1947: Polaroid camera: Edwin Land
# 1948: Long Playing Record: Peter Carl Goldmark
# 1949: Atomic clocks
# 1952: fusion bomb: Edward Teller and Stanislaw Ulam
# 1952: hovercraft: Christopher Cockerell
# 1953: maser: Charles Townes
# 1953: medical ultrasonography
# 1954: transistor radio (dated from the from Regency TR1) (USA)
# 1954: first nuclear power reactor
# 1954: geodesic dome: Buckminster Fuller
# 1955: Velcro: George de Mestral
# 1957: Jet Boat: William Hamilton
# 1957: EEG topography: Walter Grey Walter
# 1957: Bubble Wrap - Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes of Sealed Air
# 1958: the Integrated circuit: Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments, Robert Noyce at Fairchild Semiconductor
# 1959: snowmobile: Joseph-Armand Bombardier
# 1960s: Packet switching: Donald Davies and Paul Baran, video games
# 1960: lasers: Theodore Maiman, at Hughes Aircraft
# 1962: Communications satellites: Arthur C. Clarke
# 1962: Light-emitting diode: Nick Holonyak
# 1963: Hypertext: Ted Nelson
# 1963: Computer mouse: Douglas Engelbart
# 1965: 8-track tapes: William Powell Lear
# 1968: Video game console: Ralph Baer
# 1970: Fiber optics
# 1971: E-mail: Ray Tomlinson
# 1971: the Microprocessor
# 1971: the Pocket calculator
# 1971: Magnetic resonance imaging: Raymond V. Damadian
# 1972: Computed Tomography: Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield
# 1973: Ethernet: Bob Metcalfe and David Boggs
# 1973: Monash University scientists report the world's first IVF pregnancy.
# 1974: Scramjet: NASA and United States Navy -- first operational prototype flown in 2002
# 1974: Heimlich Maneuever: Henry Heimlich
# 1975: digital camera: Steven Sasson
# 1977: the personal computer (dated from Commodore PET)
# 1978: Philips releases the laserdisc player
# 1978: Spring loaded camming device: Ray Jardine
# 1979: the Walkman: Akio Morita, Masaru Ibuka, Kozo Ohsone
# 1979: the cellular telephone (first commercially fielded version, NTT)
# 1970s: Tomahawk Cruise Missile (first computerized cruise missile)
# 1983: Domain Name System: Paul Mockapetris
# 1985: polymerase chain reaction: Kary Mullis
# 1985: DNA fingerprinting: Alec Jeffreys
# 1989: the World Wide Web: Tim Berners-Lee 19th century
# 1800: Electric battery: Alessandro Volta
# 1801: Jacquard loom: Joseph Marie Jacquard
# 1802: Screw propeller steamboat Phoenix: John Stevens
# 1802: gas stove: Zachäus Andreas Winzler
# 1805: Submarine Nautilus: Robert Fulton
# 1805: Refrigerator: Oliver Evans
# 1807: Steamboat Clermont: Robert Fulton
# 1808: Band saw: William Newberry
# 1811: Gun- Breechloader: Thornton (?)
# 1812: Metronome: Dietrich Nikolaus Winkel
# 1813: Hand printing press: George Clymer
# 1814: Steam Locomotive (Blucher): George Stephenson
# 1816: Miner's safety lamp: Humphry Davy
# 1816: Metronome: Johann Nepomuk Maelzel (reputed)
# 1816: Stirling engine: Robert Stirling
# 1816: Stethoscope: Rene Theophile Hyacinthe Laennec
# 1817: Kaleidoscope: David Brewster
# 1819: Breech loading flintlock: John Hall
# 1821: Electric motor: Michael Faraday #
1823: Electromagnet: William Sturgeon
# 1826: Photography: Joseph Nicéphore Niépce
# 1826: internal combustion engine: Samuel Morey
# 1827: Insulated wire: Joseph Henry
# 1827: Screw propeller: Josef Ressel
# 1827: Friction match: John Walker
# 1830: Lawn mower: Edwin Beard Budding
# 1831: Multiple coil magnet: Joseph Henry
# 1831: Magnetic acoustic telegraph: Joseph Henry (patented 1837)
# 1831: Reaper: Cyrus McCormick
# 1831: Electrical generator: Michael Faraday, Stefan Jedlik
# 1834: June 14 - Isaac Fischer, Jr. patents sandpaper
# 1834: The Hansom cab is patented
# 1834: Louis Braille perfects his Braille system
# 1835: Photogenic Drawing: William Henry Fox Talbot
# 1835: Revolver: Samuel Colt
# 1835: Morse code: Samuel Morse
# 1835: Electromechanical Relay: Joseph Henry
# 1836: Samuel Colt receives a patent for the Colt revolver (February 24)
# 1836: Improved screw propeller: John Ericsson
# 1836: Sewing machine: Josef Madersberger
# 1837: Photography: Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre
# 1837: First US electric printing press patented by Thomas Davenport (February 25)
# 1837: Steel plow: John Deere
# 1837: Standard diving dress: Augustus Siebe
# 1837: Camera Zoom Lens: Jozef Maximilián Petzval
# 1838: Electric telegraph: Charles Wheatstone
# 1838: Forerunner of Morse code: Alfred Vail
# 1838: closed diving suit with a helmet: Augustus Siebe
# 1839: Vulcanization of rubber: Charles Goodyear
# 1840: Frigate with submarine machinery SS Princeton: John Ericsson
# 1840: artificial fertilizer: Justus von Liebig
# 1842: Anaesthesia: Crawford Long
# 1843: Typewriter: Charles Thurber
# 1843: Fax machine: Alexander Bain #
# 1844: Telegraph: Samuel Morse
# 1845: Portland cement: William Aspdin
# 1845: Double tube tire: Robert Thomson (inventor)
# 1846: Sewing machine: Elias Howe
# 1846: Rotary printing press: Richard M. Hoe
# 1849: Safety pin: Walter Hunt
# 1849: Francis turbine: James B. Francis
# 1852: Airship: Henri Giffard
# 1852: Passenger elevator: Elisha Otis
# 1852: Gyroscope: Léon Foucault
# 1853: Glider: Sir George Cayley
# 1855: Bunsen burner: Robert Bunsen
# 1855: Bessemer process: Henry Bessemer
# 1856: First celluloids: Alexander Parkes
# 1858: Undersea telegraph cable: Fredrick Newton Gisborne
# 1858: Shoe sole sewing machine: Lyman R. Blake

# 1858: Mason jar: John L. Mason
# 1859: Oil drill: Edwin L. Drake
# 1860: Linoleum: Fredrick Walton
# 1860: Repeating rifle: Oliver F. Winchester, Christopher Spencer
# 1860: Self-propelled torpedo: Ivan Lupis-Vukić
# 1861: Ironclad USS Monitor: John Ericsson
# 1861: Regenerative Furnace: Carl Wilhelm Siemens
# 1862: Revolving machine gun: Richard J. Gatling
# 1862: Mechanical submarine: Narcís Monturiol i Estarriol
# 1862: Pasteurization: Louis Pasteur, Claude Bernard
# 1863: Player piano: Henri Fourneaux
# 1864: First concept typewriter: Peter Mitterhofer
# 1865: Compression ice machine: Thaddeus Lowe
# 1866: Dynamite: Alfred Nobel
# 1867:
# 1868: First practical typewriter: Christopher Sholes, Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule, with assistance from James Densmore
# 1868: Air brake (rail): George Westinghouse
# 1868: Oleomargarine: Mege Mouries
# 1869: Vacuum cleaner: I.W. McGaffers
# 1870: Magic Lantern projector: Henry R. Heyl
# 1870: Stock ticker: Thomas Alva Edison
# 1870: Mobile Gasoline Engine, Automobile: Siegfried Marcus
# 1871: Cable car (railway): Andrew S. Hallidie
# 1871: Compressed air rock drill: Simon Ingersoll
# 1872: Celluloid (later development): John W. Hyatt
# 1872: Adding machine: Edmund D. Barbour
# 1873: Barbed wire: Joseph F. Glidden
# 1873: Railway knuckle coupler: Eli H. Janney
# 1873: Modern direct current electric motor: Zénobe Gramme
# 1874: Electric street car: Stephen Dudle Field
# 1875: Dynamo: William A. Anthony
# 1875: Gun- (magazine): Benjamin B. Hotchkiss
# 1876: Telephone: Alexander Graham Bell
# 1876: Telephone: Elisha Gray
# 1876: Carpet sweeper: Melville Bissell
# 1876: Gasoline carburettor: Daimler
# 1877: Stapler: Henry R. Heyl
# 1877: Induction motor: Nikola Tesla
# 1877: Phonograph: Thomas Alva Edison
# 1877: Electric welding: Elihu Thomson
# 1877: Twine Knotter: John Appleby
# 1878: Cathode ray tube: William Crookes
# 1878: Transparent film: Eastman Goodwin
# 1878: Rebreather: Henry Fleuss
# 1878: Incandescent Light bulb: Joseph Swan
# 1879: Pelton turbine: Lester Pelton
# 1879: Automobile engine: Karl Benz
# 1879: Cash register: James Ritty
# 1879: Automobile (Patent): George B. Seldon ... note did NOT invent auto
# 1880: Photophone: Alexander Graham Bell
# 1880: Roll film: George Eastman
# 1880: Safety razor: Kampfe Brothers
# 1880: Seismograph: John Milne
# 1881: Electric welding machine: Elihu Thomson
# 1881: Metal detector: Alexander Graham Bell
# 1882: Electric fan: Schuyler Skatts Wheeler
# 1882: Electric flat iron: Henry W. Seely
# 1883: Auto engine - compression ignition: Gottlieb Daimler
# 1883: two-phase (alternating current) induction motor: Nikola Tesla
# 1884: Linotype machine: Ottmar Mergenthaler
# 1884: Fountain pen: Lewis Waterman NB: Did not invent fountain pen, nor even "first practical fountain pen". Started manufacture in 1883, too.
# 1884: Punched card accounting: Herman Hollerith
# 1884: Trolley car, (electric): Frank Sprague, Karel Van de Poele
# 1885: Automobile, differential gear: Karl Benz
# 1885: Maxim gun: Hiram Stevens Maxim
# 1885: Motor cycle: Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach
# 1885: Alternating current transformer: William Stanley
# 1886: Gasoline engine: Gottlieb Daimler
# 1886: Improved phonograph cylinder: Tainter & Bell
# 1887: Monotype machine: Tolbert Lanston
# 1887: Contact lens: Adolf E. Fick, Eugene Kalt and August Muller
# 1887: Gramophone record: Emile Berliner
# 1887: Automobile, (gasoline): Gottlieb Daimler
# 1888: Polyphase AC Electric power system: Nikola Tesla (30 related patents.)
# 1888: Kodak hand camera: George Eastman
# 1888: Ballpoint pen: John Loud
# 1888: Pneumatic tube tire: John Boyd Dunlop
# 1888: Harvester-thresher: Matteson (?)
# 1888: Kinematograph: Augustin Le Prince
# 1889: Automobile, (steam): Sylvester Roper
# 1890: Pneumatic Hammer: Charles B. King
# 1891: Automobile Storage Battery: William Morrison
# 1891: Zipper: Whitcomb L. Judson
# 1891: Carborundum: Edward G. Acheson
# 1892: Color photography: Frederic E. Ives
# 1892: Automatic telephone exchange (electromechanical): Almon Strowger - First in commercial service.
# 1893: Photographic gun: E.J. Marcy
# 1893: Half tone engraving: Frederick Ives
# 1893: Wireless communication: Nikola Tesla
# 1895: Phatoptiken projector: Woodville Latham
# 1895: Phantascope: C. Francis Jenkins
# 1895: Disposable blades: King C. Gillette
# 1895: Diesel engine: Rudolf Diesel
# 1895: Radio signals: Guglielmo Marconi
# 1895: Shredded Wheat: Henry Perky
# 1896: Vitascope: Thomas Armat
# 1896: Steam turbine: Charles Curtis
# 1896: Electric stove: William S. Hadaway
# 1897: Automobile, magneto: Robert Bosch
# 1898: Remote control: Nikola Tesla
# 1899: Automobile self starter: Clyde J. Coleman
# 1899: Magnetic tape recorder: Valdemar Poulsen
# 1899: Gas turbine: Charles Curtis 18th cent.
# 1701: Seed drill: Jethro Tull
# 1705: Steam piston engine: Thomas Newcomen
# 1709: Piano: Bartolomeo Cristofori
# 1710: Thermometer: René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur
# 1711: Tuning fork: John Shore
# 1714: Mercury thermometer: Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit
# 1730: Mariner's quadrant: Thomas Godfrey
# 1731: Sextant: John Hadley
# 1733: Flying shuttle: John Kay (Flying Shuttle)
# 1742: Franklin stove: Benjamin Franklin
# 1750: Flatboat: Jacob Yoder
# 1752: Lightning rod: Benjamin Franklin
# 1762: Iron smelting process: Jared Eliot
# 1767: Spinning jenny: James Hargreaves
# 1767: Carbonated water: Joseph Priestley
# 1769: Steam engine: James Watt
# 1769: Water Frame: Richard Arkwright
# 1775: Submarine Turtle: David Bushnell
# 1777: Card teeth making machine: Oliver Evans
# 1777: Circular saw: Samuel Miller
# 1779: Spinning mule: Samuel Crompton
# 1783: Multitubular boiler engine: John Stevens
# 1783: Parachute: Jean Pierre Blanchard
# 1783: Hot air balloon: Montgolfier brothers
# 1784: Bifocals: Benjamin Franklin
# 1784: Shrapnel shell: Henry Shrapnel
# 1785: Power loom: Edmund Cartwright
# 1785: Automatic flour mill: Oliver Evans
# 1787: Non-condensing high pressure Engine: Oliver Evans
# 1790: Cut and head nail machine: Jacob Perkins
# 1791: Steamboat: John Fitch
# 1791: Artificial teeth: Nicholas Dubois De Chemant
# 1793: Cotton gin: Eli Whitney
# 1793: Optical telegraph: Claude Chappe
# 1797: Cast iron plow: Charles Newbold
# 1798: Vaccination: Edward Jenner
# 1798: Lithography: Alois Senefelder
# 1799: Seeding machine: Eliakim Spooner 17th century
* 1608: Telescope: Hans Lippershey
* 1609: Microscope: Galileo Galilei
* 1620: Slide rule: William Oughtred
* 1623: Automatic calculator: Wilhelm Schickard
* 1642: Adding machine: Blaise Pascal
* 1643: Barometer: Evangelista Torricelli
* 1645: Vacuum pump: Otto von Guericke
* 1657: Pendulum clock: Christiaan Huygens
* 1698: Steam engine: Thomas Savery

31 posted on 12/04/2012 10:31:36 AM PST by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Psalm 144
I’ll take a conservative Tex-Mex as friend and neighbor any day over a blue state liberal.

Same here. Our Hispanic neighbors are as conservative as we are and were shocked that 0 bummer was reelected. Sandra really hates his guts and makes no bones about that when she speaks to us. It's the only time I heard her use 4 letter words other than telling illegals to get the hell out of her country.

32 posted on 12/04/2012 11:09:14 AM PST by Arrowhead1952 (0 bummer inherited a worse economy in 2012 than he did in 2008.)
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To: Psalm 144; BlackElk
Yet they are written off.

I’ll take a conservative Tex-Mex as friend and neighbor any day over a blue state liberal.


Agreed. Rule #1, if you want someone to join your party, you have to make them feel welcome in it. Normally, we speak out against classifying people in terms of groups (excepting, of course, political identification) and then many of us will say "we can't get the Hispanic vote" which is, of course, treating them as a group.

One does not have to be in favor of amnesty or Dream Acts in order to have genuine compassion on people who are doing what it takes to provide for their families. Expressing that does NOT require retreat from legal or moral principles.

I would like to encourage Hispanics to vote conservative Republican, but when so many Republicans in Hispanic areas head for the tall grass and change the subject when abortion or pervert privilege comes up, it is kind of hard to make the sale on that basis.

Besides Life and protecting the proper definition of marriage, Hispanics don't really have a lot of use for enviro-whackos, or feminism as a general concept. But here in Illinois, the corrupt Republican party is too busy chasing the suburban bimbo from hell vote (hat top to BlackElk for term). That is a bad long term strategy ... they barely procreate and almost never truly raise their own children.
33 posted on 12/04/2012 11:42:24 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics.)
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To: bigbob

And they’ll still vote Democrat because Dems offer them government money. Natural Conservatives, pfft.


34 posted on 12/04/2012 12:05:27 PM PST by DesScorp
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To: bigbob

When are you dolts going to give up on the fantasy that Hispanics which grew up with Che Guevara posters on their bedroom wall are going to vote Republican just because they are Catholics and agree with conservatives on abortion?


35 posted on 12/04/2012 12:55:49 PM PST by RatSlayer
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To: DwFry

I seldom call other FReepers stupid even when they are, but I will make an exception for you.


36 posted on 12/04/2012 1:14:52 PM PST by Psalm 144 (Not so "commanding", not so "inevitable".)
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To: Psalm 144

Tell me what wasn’t true in my post....I’ll wait.


37 posted on 12/04/2012 3:17:01 PM PST by DwFry (Baby Boomers Killed Western Civilization!)
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