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The GOP -- Not a Club For Christians
Townhall.com ^ | December 12, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg

Posted on 12/12/2012 5:31:23 AM PST by Kaslin

In the scramble to make the GOP more diverse, a lot of people are looking at Asian Americans, whom many believe are a natural constituency for the party. I would love it if Asian Americans converted en masse to the Republican Party, but the challenge for Republicans is harder than many appreciate.

President Obama did spectacularly well with Asian Americans, garnering nearly three-quarters of their vote. This runs counter to a lot of conventional wisdom on both the left and the right. On average, Asian American family income is higher and poverty is lower than it is for non-Latino whites. Entrepreneurship, family cohesion and traditional values all run strong among Asian Americans, and reliance on government runs weak.

And yet, Asian Americans -- now the fastest-growing minority in America -- are rapidly becoming a core constituency of the Democratic Party.

I've joked for years with my Indian American relatives and friends that they are the new Jews because their parents bury them in guilt and overeducate them. It turns out it doesn't end there. Sociologist Milton Himmelfarb observed that "Jews earn like Episcopalians and vote like Puerto Ricans." Well, Indian Americans earn like Jews and ... vote like Jews.

And maybe for similar reasons. The comparison to Jews is instructive. Perhaps the most common explanation for the GOP's problem with Asian Americans is the party's pronounced embrace of Christianity, which turns off many Jews as well.

According to Pew studies, barely a third of Chinese Americans are Christian and less than a fifth of Indian Americans are.

"Whenever a Gujarati or Sikh businessman comes to a Republican event, it begins with an appeal to Jesus Christ," conservative writer Dinesh D'Souza recently told the New York Times magazine. "While the Democrats are really good at making the outsider feel at home, the Republicans make little or no effort."

My friend and colleague Ramesh Ponnuru, an Indian American and devout Catholic, says the GOP has a problem with seeming like a "club for Christians."

That rings true to me. I've attended dozens of conservative events where, as the speaker, I was, in effect, the guest of honor, and yet the opening invocation made no account of the fact that the guest of honor wasn't a Christian. I've never taken offense, but I can imagine how it might seem to someone who felt like he was even less part of the club.

A few years ago, Robert Putnam, a liberal sociologist, reported this finding: As racial and ethnic diversity increases, social trust and cohesion plummets. "Trust (even of one's own race) is lower, altruism and community cooperation rarer, friends fewer," Putnam found. "People living in ethnically diverse settings appear to 'hunker down' -- that is, to pull in like a turtle."

The villain isn't racism or bigotry or anything so simple. The phenomenon is much more complex. Indeed, it's not clear why this happens, but it's clear that it does. Economic inequality and cultural attitudes do not matter much. "Americans raised in the 1970s," Putnam writes, "seem fully as unnerved by diversity as those raised in the 1920s."

Part of the explanation stems from the fact that people with shared experiences and cultures draw strength from working together, whereas with strangers, language often becomes guarded, intentions questioned.

The GOP is not a Christian club, but there's no disputing that Christianity is a major source of strength and inspiration for many Republican activists. This is nothing new and, generally speaking, there's nothing wrong with this. The abolitionist, progressive and civil rights movements were all significantly powered by Christian faith.

As someone who's long argued for theological pluralism and moral consensus on the right, it strikes me as nuts for the GOP not to do better with Asian Americans, particularly given how little religion has to do with the policy priorities of the day.

Twenty years ago, conservatives started referring to Judeo-Christian values in an effort to be more inclusive. The challenge now is to figure out how to talk in a way that doesn't cause decent and dedicated Christians to pull in like a turtle, while also appealing to non-Judeo-Christians and the nonreligious. That'll be hard, requiring more than name-dropping Confucius or Krishna.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: christianity; christians; gop; jonahgoldberg; josephsmith; judeochristian; lds; mormon; mormonism; mormons; republicans
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1 posted on 12/12/2012 5:31:27 AM PST by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

...Christ crucified: a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles.

1 Corinthians 1:23


2 posted on 12/12/2012 5:36:54 AM PST by Obadiah (How do you know that the light at the end of the tunnel isn't a muzzle flash?)
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To: Kaslin

I did not leave the GOP, it left me.
Just looking for a REAL conservative party here!


3 posted on 12/12/2012 5:44:10 AM PST by Joe Boucher ((FUBO))
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To: Kaslin
Twenty years ago, conservatives started referring to Judeo-Christian values in an effort to be more inclusive. The challenge now is to figure out how to talk in a way that doesn't cause decent and dedicated Christians to pull in like a turtle, while also appealing to non-Judeo-Christians and the nonreligious.

Goldberg makes some good points. Look, I am a Christian and not ashamed of the Gospel. If we can get Buddhists and Jews and Hindus to agree with us on sanctity of life and free markets, let's do it.

4 posted on 12/12/2012 5:44:44 AM PST by SoFloFreeper
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To: Kaslin

We no longer have any cultural identity. Assimilation is a thng of the past. Judeo-Christian beliefs and principles created what we once had, cultural and religious diversity will destroy everything. The curse at Babel was and is very real. The Dims understand this reality well. Beyond that, no sense flogging a horse as dead as the Republican Party.


5 posted on 12/12/2012 5:46:43 AM PST by bereanway
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To: Kaslin

The GOP — Not a Club For Christians
______________________________________

When I saw the title I thought it meant Christians are not welcome...

We’re not of course...

Christians are Conservatives...


6 posted on 12/12/2012 5:51:32 AM PST by Tennessee Nana
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To: SoFloFreeper
I just really don't care anymore about people for whom any mention of Christianity is taken as some kind of existential threat.

No other religion on this planet is expected to self-censor itself in public so thoroughly, and no other one does.

I don't want any more hot house flowers who wet their pants when they hear someone else's opinion; this country already has enough of them.

Is this the great "immigrant spirit" we're supposed to worship?

7 posted on 12/12/2012 5:54:23 AM PST by Trailerpark Badass (So?)
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To: Trailerpark Badass

Imagine if most of the Republican Party was Hindu, you generally agreed with the Party on policy, but at Republican events, in articles, etc. there was as much mentioning of Brahma and Hinduism as there is of Christianity today.

Would it bother you in the slightest?


8 posted on 12/12/2012 6:05:57 AM PST by Strategerist
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To: Kaslin

As a conservative Christian, I don’t want to sail with this boat. I think, with the loss of the election to the unfaithful, it is time for conservatives to look at a 3rd party. Then, with the Republican party looking more like the Democratic party, hoping to gain on-the fence Democrats, and with the dilutions of both the party’s, we may have a chance. Fifty million people did not vote for this assault on America.


9 posted on 12/12/2012 6:06:47 AM PST by heavy9 (heavy 9)
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To: Kaslin
The villain isn't racism or bigotry or anything so simple.

The hell its not. Wasn't all the talk about the GOP being the party of old white men evidence enough?

Until we understand and acknowledge the gross double standard the left is promulgating and begin holding EVERYONE to the same standard of tolerance this country will continue its steepening descent.

10 posted on 12/12/2012 6:11:39 AM PST by skeeter
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To: heavy9
Then, with the Republican party looking more like the Democratic party, hoping to gain on-the fence Democrats, and with the dilutions of both the party’s, we may have a chance.

You're going to dilute only one party - the GOP. Don't kid yourself.

If you want to create a regional party in the Bible Belt that has no ability to ever win the Presidency, and ends the GOP chances of doing so till the end of time, that's fine, but be sure you are clear on the actual implications.

11 posted on 12/12/2012 6:12:33 AM PST by Strategerist
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To: Strategerist
Imagine if most of the Republican Party was Hindu, you generally agreed with the Party on policy, but at Republican events, in articles, etc. there was as much mentioning of Brahma and Hinduism as there is of Christianity today.

If I moved to India I would choose the political party that offered the most individual freedom.

If they based their ideology upon Hinduism and made constant references to it, no I wouldn't mind religious references in the least.

12 posted on 12/12/2012 6:16:51 AM PST by skeeter
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To: Kaslin

I think there is a different reason underlying who Asians support, and who they do not.

Take the Chinese, for example. China is officially an atheist nation, but practically speaking, Christianity is rapidly becoming the religion of the entrepreneurial and business classes. The attitude is that successful people become Christians.

This attitude likely does not change when Chinese come to America.

Otherwise, Chinese have long been called “The Jews of the Orient”, because they share with Jews a very old Oriental philosophy of culture. It is not the same tradition, of course, but it is a parallel outlook on life and history.

And this outlook on life and history is very different from the western, Christian view of life and history.

On top of even that, the Chinese have long had a cultural but not particularly hostile, divide between Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism, living side by side. And Islam and Christianity have been there for centuries as well.

So at least as far as the Chinese are concerned, I don’t think that religion is a big sticking point with them in American politics.


13 posted on 12/12/2012 6:35:31 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Pennies and Nickels will NO LONGER be Minted as of 1/1/13 - Tim Geithner, US Treasury Sect)
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To: SoFloFreeper
Look, I am a Christian and not ashamed of the Gospel. If we can get Buddhists and Jews and Hindus to agree with us on sanctity of life and free markets, let's do it.

He's telling you to drop the Christianity, abrogate your faith publicly, and to burn incense on the public altar of "humanism".

Stop being such an American! You're making the new neighbors nervous!

14 posted on 12/12/2012 6:36:16 AM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: skeeter
If they based their ideology upon Hinduism and made constant references to it, no I wouldn't mind religious references in the least.

In exact point of fact, the Indian BJT Party does exactly that; they're Hindu nationalists, and their main problem is runaway family/demographic expansion of the Moslem minority, which is now up to 30% of India's population. The whole idea of dividing India and Pakistan was to keep the warring Hindus and Moslems apart, and now it looks like the Moslems might be able to force a second partition by the exercise of their genitals.

Over here, however, you're not allowed to take such things into consideration -- that's divisive and a thought-crime, especially for you, since you are one of them, the hated, suspect them who need to be watched, categorically criticized at every turn, and criminalized at every opportunity.

15 posted on 12/12/2012 6:42:48 AM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: skeeter
You are so right. We choose the political party that most closely represents our beliefs. It makes no sense for a non-christian Asian, who want economic opportunity to ally themselves with Democrats, no matter the religion of either party.

One does not have to pass a Christian-litmus test in order to be a Republican.

16 posted on 12/12/2012 6:45:28 AM PST by Conservativegreatgrandma
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To: Strategerist
Imagine if most of the Republican Party was Hindu, ....Would it bother you in the slightest?

This is our house, Jack.

If you don't believe that, then get ready to pay rent for the privilege of working for minimum wage in the house your fathers built.

And get used to being called "chump" by smartass strangers on the make. They'll take you and take you -- because whatever you are, whatever you do, you aren't one of theirs.

Get it?

17 posted on 12/12/2012 6:50:45 AM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: Strategerist

You are something of a leader of the anti-Christian, anti-social conservative, pro-liberal group here.

Now you plead for us to stay in this new anti-Christian GOP that you are striving for.

Christians will not support your agenda.


18 posted on 12/12/2012 6:55:58 AM PST by ansel12 (A.Coulter2005(truncated)Romney will never recover from his Court's create of a right to gay marriage)
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To: Kaslin
(Article) A few years ago, Robert Putnam, a liberal sociologist, reported this finding: As racial and ethnic diversity increases, social trust and cohesion plummets.

If it hurts social trust and cohesion .... knock it off! To put that in Atlantic Slope vernacular, "Whaddaya, stoopid?! Knock it off, yer tearin' the country apart!"

Which is exactly what you want -- tearing the country apart -- if you're a Communist, a jihadi, or a Mau-Mau. Or all of the above.

19 posted on 12/12/2012 7:00:22 AM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: Strategerist

You anti-Christian types have proven that you can’t even win against Carter’s second term.

Your Romney guy was an absolute disaster for the GOP and may be the cause of the party’s downfall.

You guys don’t know squat about what wins elections.


20 posted on 12/12/2012 7:00:57 AM PST by ansel12 (A.Coulter2005(truncated)Romney will never recover from his Court's create of a right to gay marriage)
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To: Strategerist
If you want to create a regional party in the Bible Belt that has no ability to ever win the Presidency, and ends the GOP chances of doing so till the end of time

That's called "the catbird seat" and is a good place to be.

At least, it was good enough for John McCain and the RiNO's when they put together the "Gang of 14" -- remember that? -- in the Senate.

Sauce for the RiNO is sauce for the Tea Party. We can broker stuff, too.

Quit warning us off the prize.

21 posted on 12/12/2012 7:06:48 AM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: lentulusgracchus

He’s saying no such thing. He’s simply saying that tying the Republican Party to one faith is not a very good strategy to win over people of other faiths or no faiths. I’m saying that as a self-identified Christian.


22 posted on 12/12/2012 7:25:39 AM PST by driftless2
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To: Kaslin

Conservatives should fight diversity itself. Fight the culture war first, win elections second.


23 posted on 12/12/2012 7:39:00 AM PST by kreitzer
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To: lentulusgracchus; Trailerpark Badass
He's telling you to drop the Christianity, abrogate your faith publicly, and to burn incense on the public altar of "humanism".

Stop being such an American! You're making the new neighbors nervous!

I don't read it that way at all. Goldberg is a Jew, and doesn't obviously take offense at the invocation of the name of Christ...he merely is speaking, seems to me, about the need to reach out to people of other faiths who share the same economic and social principles. I agree with him.

I just really don't care anymore about people for whom any mention of Christianity is taken as some kind of existential threat.
No other religion on this planet is expected to self-censor itself in public so thoroughly, and no other one does.
I don't want any more hot house flowers who wet their pants when they hear someone else's opinion; this country already has enough of them.
Is this the great "immigrant spirit" we're supposed to worship?

I agree with you, but I don't think that was Goldberg's POV. He isn't saying "Shut up Christians", he is saying "Republicans don't have to be Christians." And I think that is true.

24 posted on 12/12/2012 7:39:12 AM PST by SoFloFreeper
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To: Kaslin

First off the Mourdock and Aikin loss.When it comes to defending a fundamental religious concept the godless ones have been pretty good at attacking an article of faith and reducing it to ridicule. Now the camp followers in the media as well as certain “conservative” agnostic or atheistic loudmouths help piling it on and the stampede is triggered.
The question becomes how should conservatives handle it ?
Here is a suggested response...

“I happen to believe bla bla bla which will has nothing to do with any legislation that may cross my desk and never will....At least I believe in God ...as a political party God is someone they booed...use the convention clip ...and the ten commandments.... and if you examine (insert name) conduct in office (his her) re-election seems to be a re-newall for the license to steal
...


25 posted on 12/12/2012 7:39:30 AM PST by mosesdapoet ("A voice crying in the wilderness make streight for the way of the Lord")
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To: driftless2
He’s simply saying that tying the Republican Party to one faith is not a very good strategy to win over people of other faiths or no faiths. I’m saying that as a self-identified Christian.

Your statement would make sense if the country had 46 faiths, with none of them more than a 4% share.

Fact is, the country was founded on a compact, the compact itself was founded on, reliant on, the People's having Christian principles and good moral character. The Framers themselves emphasized this point as a caveat, over and over.

You can't split differences or find common ground between Christianity and Voodoo or Candomble or Palo Mayombe or Hinduism the way you can with Judaism. Theoretically, one could stretch and include Islam as one of the "peoples of the Book", if it were not for Islam's hostility, and that of its chief aggrandizers.

One religion has to predominate, and Christianity has the best moral, historical, and pragmatic claim to being that religion. Goldberg is just doing his Jewish demurrer thing -- he uses the rhetorical device of preterition to lay his marker here -- in asking Christians to quit being so Christian about it. Well, sorry, Jonah, but when these Protestants invoke the protection and wisdom of Providence, they have a strong tendency -- a teaching by their Nazarene Rabbi -- to do it that way.

26 posted on 12/12/2012 7:42:52 AM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: Strategerist
Imagine if most of the Republican Party was Hindu, you generally agreed with the Party on policy, but at Republican events, in articles, etc. there was as much mentioning of Brahma and Hinduism as there is of Christianity today.

Would it bother you in the slightest?


Only if they wouldn't let me eat my cheeseburger in peace.
27 posted on 12/12/2012 7:54:24 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics.)
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To: Joe Boucher

I am with you and for a new party for Conservatives... 100%!

LLS


28 posted on 12/12/2012 8:09:57 AM PST by LibLieSlayer (WOLVERINES!)
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To: lentulusgracchus
It will mean that Christians will be pushed into the hinterland.
29 posted on 12/12/2012 8:12:14 AM PST by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: Strategerist
It is you that needs to understand that as soon as boehner caves... it is the end of YOUR party. NEVER AGAIN!!! romney and ryan were the last to enjoy the votes of us that gave them ONE LAST CHANCE. No do overs... no mercy and no quarter. Don't kid YOURSELF! republicans are hated by the left... by the average American and by most Conservatives. They are beyond saving... they are the NEW COKE.

LLS

30 posted on 12/12/2012 8:14:47 AM PST by LibLieSlayer (WOLVERINES!)
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To: Kaslin

The GOP - not a club for Conservatives.

It is important to remember that a political party is not about principles, but about power for its members. If the GOP doesn’t see a path to power through Conservatism, it isn’t going to be Conservative. Since it is likely we have reached both a Demographic and Social tipping point, we can expect to see both the Democrats and Republicans heading left as fast as they possibly can.


31 posted on 12/12/2012 8:19:01 AM PST by Little Ray (Get back to work. Your urban masters need their EBTs refilled.)
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To: Kaslin

How can one call the GOP a “Christian club” when it nominated for its presidential standard bearer a non-Christian?


32 posted on 12/12/2012 8:21:45 AM PST by Fiji Hill (Io Triumphe!)
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To: Little Ray

republicans cannot win with 90% of the support of Conservatives and when 45% of the party walks away from the republican party, they will never win another national election. They have lost most of us on the right... they will see their treason rot the fruit on their vines.

LLS


33 posted on 12/12/2012 8:22:52 AM PST by LibLieSlayer (WOLVERINES!)
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To: Kaslin

Did Goldberg watch the Republican National Convention? Each day, the invocation and the benediction were performed by someone of a different faith.


34 posted on 12/12/2012 8:24:56 AM PST by Fiji Hill (Io Triumphe!)
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To: LibLieSlayer

The GOP does not care whether it is in majority or not, as log as its members get to keep “their” seats.


35 posted on 12/12/2012 9:18:18 AM PST by Little Ray (Get back to work. Your urban masters need their EBTs refilled.)
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To: Little Ray

Many will be voted out of office in 2014.

LLS


36 posted on 12/12/2012 9:27:23 AM PST by LibLieSlayer (WOLVERINES!)
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To: Tennessee Nana

“Christians are Conservatives...”

Just as the overwhelming majority of “conservatives” (in the traditional sense) are Christians — and always will be.

The reality here, uncomfortable to many, is that Christianity is the foundation upon which traditional “American conservatism” is constructed.

Take away that foundation, and the edifice built upon it collapses.

The neocons are desperately trying to tiptoe their way around this truth, refusing to acknowledge it or confront it head-on. Goldberg’s article above is an example of such footwork.

The prime reason that the majority of the Asian newcomers do not and will not embrace traditional conservatism is because they’re not Christians. They may indeed be hard-working, but they are also from a culture that traditionally embraces “conformity” to the “system”, a concept almost anathema to the “Scots-Irish” vein of conservatism that celebrates individualism and a mistrust of government.

I doubt the Republican party will ever do much better with Asians than it’s currently doing with Hispanics. Oh, they’ll try and they’ll pander, and in doing so lose many of the Euro-conservatives they actually -need- to remain the regional political party that they are “shrinking towards”.

It will probably do then more harm than good.

Mr. Goldberg, wake up!


37 posted on 12/12/2012 9:34:35 AM PST by Road Glide
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To: Strategerist; heavy9

“If you want to create a regional party in the Bible Belt that has no ability to ever win the Presidency, and ends the GOP chances of doing so till the end of time, that’s fine, but be sure you are clear on the actual implications.”

The Pubbies seem to be doing a fine job in “regionalizing” themselves, without any help from heavy9 at all.

Want to see them REALLY self-destruct? Then abandon the Christians while trying to coax non-Christians into the party.

The results will be:
- Very few non-Christians will join up, but...
- Millions of Christians will leave in disgust.

There, that fixed it!
That’s what I call strategery!


38 posted on 12/12/2012 9:40:46 AM PST by Road Glide
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To: Fiji Hill

“How can one call the GOP a “Christian club” when it nominated for its presidential standard bearer a non-Christian?”

Very good point.

Do you think that could have been a factor as to why a large number of Republicans/conservatives simply stayed home this past election?

I do.


39 posted on 12/12/2012 9:48:23 AM PST by Road Glide
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To: Kaslin
Republicans need to reach out to the blacks...Republicans need to reach out to the hispanics...Republicans need to reach out to asians...

How about reaching out to the NINETY MILLION eligible voters who stay home on Election Day?

40 posted on 12/12/2012 9:54:10 AM PST by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: LibLieSlayer

Count me in, a conservative party caucusing with Republicans could actually have some clout. It would force Republicans into more conservative policies in order for them to maintain any kind of party power federally.


41 posted on 12/12/2012 10:46:38 AM PST by CityCenter (Compromise is the welcome mat to deception.)
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To: lentulusgracchus

How do you expect people who are not Christians to be attracted to a party that announces it’s a Christian party? I’m a Christian, and so were the Founders. But like the Founders, a person’s religious beliefs should not be forced on others. That’s why they deliberately created a country with no official religion. We are for freedom of religious expression...but not for creating a religious-based political party.


42 posted on 12/12/2012 11:38:59 AM PST by driftless2
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To: LibLieSlayer

Slayer,
I’m more than fed up with these baboso’s like lindsey graham, or john boehner who profess to speak for the party.
I wouldn’t give anus heads like these guys two minutes.
Time to quit capitulating to RINO crappola.

You doing ok LLS? all ok here.


43 posted on 12/12/2012 11:51:03 AM PST by Joe Boucher ((FUBO))
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To: Joe Boucher
I am doing fine Joe... like you I am ready to kick some rino arse and destroy democrat lives. Take no prisoners and offer no quarter to either. GOD bless and Merry Christmas friend.

LLS

44 posted on 12/12/2012 12:20:35 PM PST by LibLieSlayer (WOLVERINES!)
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To: CityCenter

I think that you are on to something!

LLS


45 posted on 12/12/2012 12:22:58 PM PST by LibLieSlayer (WOLVERINES!)
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To: driftless2
That’s why they deliberately created a country with no official religion. We are for freedom of religious expression...but not for creating a religious-based political party.

Okay, you get freedom of expression, but if you go back and read Goldberg's comment again toward the end of the article, you'll see that he is appealing to Christians to refrain from free expression.

He's just practicing a mitzvah, a good deed -- practicing Jewish piety by asking Christians to stick a sock in it (so that God and conscientious Jews don't have to listen to their impious drivel).

46 posted on 12/12/2012 12:29:24 PM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: Road Glide
The results will be:
- Very few non-Christians will join up, but...
- Millions of Christians will leave in disgust.

There, that fixed it!
That’s what I call strategery



Clarity bump.

And that is just the pragmatic argument.

47 posted on 12/12/2012 12:34:46 PM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: driftless2
.....a person’s religious beliefs should not be forced on others

Agree, but actually that's not what is happening. The author claims that is happening, but that's just a bushwah liberal appeal to motive in lieu of argument: "oooh, oooh, oooh, your Christian witnessing is putting me in an 'iron maiden' and torturing me with red-hot irons to confess the magisterium of the Catholic Church and the Holy Office / the prophetic truth of Mohammed and the Koran /.... oh, what was it again? Zionism? Zeusism? Zoroastrianism? Herpes zoster? Oooh, oooh, oooh, you're torturing me!!!"

Free expression isn't even in the same ballpark as "you have to convert to Xtianity or Hesychasmism or Nestorianism, if you want to be a Republican."

Tea Partiers and Christian conservative Republicans 99% of the time don't do that, but they get taxed with it constantly, and for the most part falsely, as a cheap and socially acceptable way of sneering at their faith and their devotion to it.

48 posted on 12/12/2012 12:48:55 PM PST by lentulusgracchus
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To: Road Glide
Do you think [Romney's Mormon faith] could have been a factor as to why a large number of Republicans/conservatives simply stayed home this past election?

I do.

I do, too. The "Mormon thing" was a big issue with a lot of conservative Christians.

49 posted on 12/12/2012 2:14:28 PM PST by Fiji Hill (Io Triumphe!)
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To: Fiji Hill

Didn’t the states where some conservatives may have foolishly sat out the elections vote for Romney anyway? Romney was supposed to be competitive in “moderate” states but certainly was not. Thre wasn’t a single moderate state upset for Romney. There were few upsets at all in 2012.


50 posted on 12/12/2012 3:43:32 PM PST by Theodore R. ("Hey, the American people must all be crazy out there!")
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