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Doctors: Junior Seau's brain had CTE
espn.go.com ^ | 1/10/13 | Mark Fainaru-Wada, Jim Avila and Steve Fainaru

Posted on 01/10/2013 12:06:35 PM PST by ColdOne

SAN DIEGO -- Junior Seau, who committed suicide in May, two years after retiring as one of the premier linebackers in NFL history, suffered from the type of chronic brain damage that also has been found in dozens of deceased former players, five brain specialists consulted by the National Institutes of Health concluded.

Seau's ex-wife, Gina, and his oldest son Tyler, 23, told ABC News and ESPN in an exclusive interview they were informed last week that Seau's brain had tested positive for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease that can lead to dementia, memory loss and depression.

(Excerpt) Read more at espn.go.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cte; football; juniorseau
Having lived in the SD area most of my life Seau was one of my favorite players.
1 posted on 01/10/2013 12:06:45 PM PST by ColdOne
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To: ColdOne

This is one of the reasons that my enthusiasm for the game of football has waned considerably over the past few years.

I think one thing that should be looked at is weight limitations on players.....they are simply too big and too fast now.


2 posted on 01/10/2013 12:09:25 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: ColdOne

There are two sports I told my son I would not allow him to play: hockey and football.

Simply too much risk. He’s quite happy with baseball and now has taken up basketball. Despite his lack of height he’s an amazing player.


3 posted on 01/10/2013 12:12:30 PM PST by TheRhinelander
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To: dfwgator
"Five years to play four."

That oughta be the rule in the NFL too.

4 posted on 01/10/2013 12:16:20 PM PST by OKSooner ("The grace of the Lord Jesus be with God's people. Amen." - Revelation 22:21)
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To: ColdOne

This is tragic.

We put a weapon on the heads of the participants and tell them not to use it. If I hadn’t witnessed a teammate breaking his neck by spearing rather than using his face, I’d have done it too.

There are solutions. One is to put an accelerometer in every helmet with a warning light/buzzer. If the player experiences an impact over a certain level, game over for him.

Another solution would be to go to back to a leather helmet. If it immediately hurts to use your head to spear someone, you won’t do it.


5 posted on 01/10/2013 12:18:26 PM PST by brownsfan (Behold, the power of government cheese.)
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To: ColdOne
We know there will be concussion suits against the NFL.

If the NFL knew about the problem but kept quiet, I would expect the suits to be successful.
If the NFL could prove they didn't know enough about the problem, the suits would have a higher bar to overcome.

Since football concussions are a proven problem now, how many NFL players will give up millions of dollars and quit football to save their sanity? I think very few. - tom

6 posted on 01/10/2013 12:23:20 PM PST by Capt. Tom
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To: ColdOne

Junior Seau loved his mother and father more than anything. If he was in his right mind he would never do anything to cause the pain and sorrow that his suicide brought to them.


7 posted on 01/10/2013 12:24:53 PM PST by forgotten man (forgotten man)
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To: TheRhinelander
There are two sports I told my son I would not allow him to play: hockey and football.
Banned football for my two sons too after reading that 50% who played football through college ended up with an injury that would affect them for a lifetime.
They ended up playing baseball, soccer and basketball.
8 posted on 01/10/2013 12:25:05 PM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: brownsfan

Or no helmet at all. Rugby is a tackle sport that has neither helmets nor pads.


9 posted on 01/10/2013 12:26:01 PM PST by FewsOrange
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To: brownsfan

No it’s not. He exchanged his life for money in full knowledge the game can kill and maim.

Football fans and other fans exchange their money to pay them directly and indirectly.

To quote Russel Crow in Gladiator, “Are you not entertained?”
It is unfortunate. But it is no tragedy. Everyone bought their ‘ticket’ and took their chances. If all are good with that, free will has been exercised.

And whether they are 98 pound weaklings or steroid supermen does not matter.


10 posted on 01/10/2013 12:28:33 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: forgotten man

I agree. A reason I think he shot himself in the chest.


11 posted on 01/10/2013 12:29:29 PM PST by ColdOne (I miss my poochie... Tasha 2000~3/14/11)
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To: ColdOne

how do they know CTE is not that “extra something” that allows them to achieve the level of the NFL. In that it was always there.


12 posted on 01/10/2013 12:32:49 PM PST by edcoil (Manage your own lawsuit: www.jurisdictionary.com?refercode=KK0012)
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To: FewsOrange

I would not be surprised if you found the same problems in the brains of rugby players.


13 posted on 01/10/2013 12:38:00 PM PST by needmorePaine
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To: dfwgator

Its not to hard to slow down the speed of the game.

I have done design work on Field Turf football fields. Then I did a Field Turf baseball field; and, I learned a trick: replace some of the rubber pellets in the field with sand. The purpose of this was to prevent the baseball from bouncing unnaturally fast and hitting some player in the teeth.

Hmmm...if balls bounce off Field Turf unnaturally fast, so do your feet. The NFL could slow down much of the game, if they sanded some of their artificial fields.


14 posted on 01/10/2013 12:38:32 PM PST by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: Norm Lenhart
Football fans and other fans exchange their money to pay them directly and indirectly.

I believe that one of the reasons fans are so fanatic about football is that is the modern day equivalent of Roman Gladiators. It satisfies a primal need to divide and conquer, and in some respects war. Players, coaches, announcers and fans all use war metaphors to describe the action.

That said, I hope the Broncos kill the Ravens this weekend.

15 posted on 01/10/2013 12:40:31 PM PST by IamConservative (The soul of my lifes journey is Liberty!)
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To: Norm Lenhart

“No it’s not. He exchanged his life for money in full knowledge the game can kill and maim.”

I couldn’t disagree with you more. While I agree football is a violent game, and that there is a trade off in terms of bodily punishment for money, death is not an acceptable result.

In the old days, “getting your bell rung” was no big deal. Guys played with concussions. We now know that concussions can lead to serious mental issues.

Therefore it’s tragic in my view.

Now that we know, something has to be done, if not, it becomes on the level of gladiators.


16 posted on 01/10/2013 12:44:41 PM PST by brownsfan (Behold, the power of government cheese.)
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To: edcoil

good question


17 posted on 01/10/2013 12:46:39 PM PST by ColdOne (I miss my poochie... Tasha 2000~3/14/11)
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To: ColdOne

I am very skeptical about this new “disease” The symptoms listed occur in 75% of the people I know that are older than 40. Methinks the thought of a lot of research money may be exerting just a taaaaaaaaad of influence on these researchers somewhat like the explosion in diagnosis of ADHD when money started getting thrown at it. Who is to say that this disease is not a side effect of possible use HGH,anabolic steroids, Adderral,street drugs either solely or in combination. Causality does not equal causation.


18 posted on 01/10/2013 12:47:07 PM PST by Cyman
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To: Norm Lenhart

He didn’t have full knowledge though. One of the big problems the league is running into, why they’re going to lose the lawsuits against them, is in the early 90s they released a “study” saying that concussion had no long term side effects. They lied to the players, including Seau.


19 posted on 01/10/2013 12:47:32 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: Cyman

There’s nothing new about it. People have known about CTEs in some name or another since the 1930s, the only thing new is doing the autopsies necessary to find out just how many people, mostly athletes, suffer from it.


20 posted on 01/10/2013 12:51:37 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: FewsOrange

“Or no helmet at all. Rugby is a tackle sport that has neither helmets nor pads.”

I love football as it is, and really loved the old days of blowing a guy up when he went over the middle. But, I don’t want people to die for my entertainment.

I’d be ok with no helmet football. And it would stop people from leading with their head. But a leather helmet, sort of like what amateur boxers wear, would stop some nasty gashes.


21 posted on 01/10/2013 12:51:39 PM PST by brownsfan (Behold, the power of government cheese.)
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To: discostu

There’s nothing new about it. People have known about CTEs in some name or another since the 1930s, the only thing new is doing the autopsies necessary to find out just how many people, mostly athletes, suffer from it

You are correct, just me phrasing it incorrectly. I should have said “ CTE with a new football etiology”


22 posted on 01/10/2013 12:58:01 PM PST by Cyman
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To: Cyman

Even that’s not very new, it was 2002 when the right autopsies were done and they started figuring out football players get it too. Honestly it’s just willful ignorance that kept us thinking football players, and anybody else that gets concussions, didn’t suffer from this for so long. Every other part of the body we know that all damage leaves something permanent, there’s always some level of permanent damage to bruises, breaks and cuts, we’ve known that for generations. Yet somehow we let ourselves believe the brain was different concussions (bruises) left no permanent damage there. Now they’ve done enough of the right autopsies where we can’t pretend anymore.


23 posted on 01/10/2013 1:11:02 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: dfwgator

A lot of this has to do with the protective armor players wear, particularly in hockey. The irony is that the gear is intended to protect players vital parts, but actually delivers a high amount of kinetic energy upon impact, particularly to the brain. The gear makes players believe they are immune to injury, and thus encouraged to hit harder and faster than what you once saw in the 1970’s. Other than the “dirty” players like Jack Tatum and George Atkinson, you didn’t see the speed and impact back then. You certainly do now.

The NHL is aware of how the protective armor impacts the player on the receiving end. There was some discussion about softer padding on the exterior of the armor to cushion the blow delivered. Players didn’t like it because they said it restricted their movement.


24 posted on 01/10/2013 1:20:20 PM PST by henkster ("The people who count the votes decide everything." -Joseph Stalin)
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To: TheRhinelander

“There are two sports I told my son I would not allow him to play: hockey and football.”

As an ex-canadian, I played hockey since I learned how to skate. The top major sports are full contact sports. Even the NBA when I was watching the Sonics with my uncle, I had seats 2 rows out from the basket and whenever those 6’10 guys rebound the ball, you will hear massive bone hits. Wished you reconsider on hockey as it’s not only a beautiful game but a strategic one at best.


25 posted on 01/10/2013 1:32:08 PM PST by max americana (Make the world a better place by punching a liberal in the face)
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To: brownsfan
"no helmet"

The high amount of deaths in the early 1900s from head injuries provoked national outrage and motivated Congress and President Teddy Roosevelt to force colleges to have their players wear helmets and padding. Wearing helmets cut the deaths down drastically. Spongier helmets would be a better solution than no helmets.

26 posted on 01/10/2013 1:55:48 PM PST by driftless2
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To: dfwgator
I think one thing that should be looked at is weight limitations on players.....they are simply too big and too fast now.

If the NFL took steroid abuse seriously, that wouldn't be the case. But they don't, players have ways around the testing and they get hurt in ways that normal people wouldn't as a result of their unnatural mass and speed. If you removed steroids for real, players would deflate and the number of sever injuries would taper off. Baseball survived the tough medicine of getting serious about roids, football can too.

27 posted on 01/10/2013 2:01:02 PM PST by pepsi_junkie (Who is John Galt?)
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To: ColdOne

You and me both.


28 posted on 01/10/2013 2:13:40 PM PST by onyx (FREE REPUBLIC IS HERE TO STAY! DONATE MONTHLY! IF YOU WANT ON SARAH PALIN''S PING LIST, LET ME KNOW)
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To: max americana

Seen too many people paralyzed but the main reason for hockey is it is amazingly expensive and my son hates skating. :)


29 posted on 01/10/2013 2:21:33 PM PST by TheRhinelander
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To: brownsfan

Here’s my thing...

I am not opposed to Football. My sport was Off-Road racing I used to cover it professionally. I have cartwheeled in a Class 10 car at over 70 mph through a cactus patch. I also sat aside Ivan Stewart careening out of control through a boulder field. So I well understand the risks.

And I’d do it again knowing I could easily get killed.

Off-road race vehicles are cages of Chro-moly steel, 6 point safety harnesses, fire suits and helments.

But you can only make things so safe. In any endeavor in sport, there is risk. In some, a lot of life ending risk. People do it for the thrill, the money, the fame...whatever.

But the risks are known. And we do them. And people die. And the crowd roars.

I am not indifferent to the bad things. I just want people to realize that 1: the players know the risks and the risks unknown do not matter. 2: the crowd loves a good crash.

It’s human nature, for better or worse.


30 posted on 01/10/2013 2:22:37 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: discostu

He had the full knowledge that head or other football caused injuries can lead to death.

Anything more is simply details.


31 posted on 01/10/2013 2:33:49 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: IamConservative
That said, I hope the Broncos kill the Ravens this weekend.

From your lips (keyboard) to the football gods' ears. Go, Broncos!!

32 posted on 01/10/2013 2:37:52 PM PST by Hoffer Rand (There ARE two Americas: "God's children" and the tax payers)
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To: Norm Lenhart

He didn’t have the knowledge that even minor concussions lead to permanent brain damage, the league had specifically told the player they didn’t.


33 posted on 01/10/2013 2:40:30 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: IamConservative

It is gladiator combat. Always was the modern version. Just like Boxing oe MMA.

People just sleep better thinking everyone involved goes home unaffected. Thats the truth of it. No one wants to admit they are paying to watch people potentially die. But that is what happens whether they consciously think it or not.

They sit and watch humans risk their life with every hit and impact. And they sometimes are maimed or killed.

Jack Tatum did not end Football with his hit. The crowds are bigger than ever. Because human nature it to thrive on violence and conflict. It’s only morality that reins us in. So instead of swords and “The Running Man”, we watch padded helmeted football and justify ourselves.


34 posted on 01/10/2013 2:40:30 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: TheRhinelander
There are two sports I told my son I would not allow him to play: hockey and football.

Good for you, if I had a son (who didn't look like Obama), I wouldn't allow him to play those sports either. There's too many other sports available for them...........(but not soccer!)

35 posted on 01/10/2013 2:44:51 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (Jab her with a harpoon or just throw her from the train......)
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To: discostu

I have had people tell me all sorts of things that defy common sense too. If you play a full contact sport and do not innately know you could die/whatever in ways not specified in a report or the PDR, then you lack the mental clarity to play said sport to begin with.

Dead is dead. Maimed is maimed. Does it REALLY matter how you get there? Really?


36 posted on 01/10/2013 2:49:45 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: Norm Lenhart

It’s not just about dieing. The chances of dieing due to football injury are incredibly slim. It’s about permanent brain damage. Which players were told wouldn’t happen, and now the science coming out is saying it’s just about guaranteed. It’s not a matter of not specified in a report, the report specifically said no long term damage would occur, the league deliberately LIED to the players.

Yeah actually it does matter. When your employer specifically says you won’t suffer long term damage working for them and that’s a deliberate lie it matters a lot.


37 posted on 01/10/2013 2:54:21 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: FewsOrange
Rugby is a tackle sport that has neither helmets nor pads.

I'm sorry, I've followed rugby for many years and in NO WAY does it even come close to the contact that occurs in professional football.........or college football for that matter.

38 posted on 01/10/2013 2:55:20 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (Jab her with a harpoon or just throw her from the train......)
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To: discostu

Legally, yes it does.

Think he would have not played because of it? Think one of those stars will quit because of it? Think one fan will stop watching?

Nope.

So in the end after studies and HASS devices and whatever they dream up to defy reality, there will be another death\/injury known/buried in a study.

Rinse and repeat because i the end they will still fight and we will still watch. So no. It does not matter. Didn’t matter with Tatum and several other mega hit/injuries, won’t matter now. The games must go on.


39 posted on 01/10/2013 2:58:22 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: Norm Lenhart

A number of stars have retired due to head injuries. A number of parents aren’t letting their kids play the sport because of the head injury problem, so future stars WILL be kept away. There’s starting to be indications some of the fan base is leaning away from the game because of the long term health issues.

Sorry but you’re full of crap. Just look at this thread. Look at the number of people backing away from the sport and keeping their kids out of it. It DOES matter. If they can’t find a way to dramatically reduce concussions in the sport it WILL fade, if only because of the lack of inbound talent. Racing has faced similar issues, spates of death are bad for a sport.


40 posted on 01/10/2013 3:04:34 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: dfwgator

I thought it wasn’t the one catastrophic impact of gigantic men running into eachother so much, but all the repeated smaller ones on the head throughout their football career. How do you alter that though? I mean think of all the hits a nfl player will take at all levels of football by the time he is good enough for the nfl. Not catastrophic impacts, but repeated lesser ones.

Freegards


41 posted on 01/10/2013 3:06:06 PM PST by Ransomed
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To: dfwgator

I thought it wasn’t the one catastrophic impact of gigantic men running into eachother so much, but all the repeated smaller ones on the head throughout their football career. How do you alter that though? I mean think of all the hits a nfl player will take at all levels of football by the time he is good enough for the nfl. Not catastrophic impacts, but repeated lesser ones.

Freegards


42 posted on 01/10/2013 3:11:04 PM PST by Ransomed
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To: discostu

Maybe I am. When we see contact sport games go bankrupt from lack of attendance you will be proven right. Until then, there will be stars to replace stars. There will be parents getting their kids into these sports to take the places of those who pull theirs out.

And when the traditional American sports are bubblwrapped to the height of boredom and ended, the competitors will take it underground to other forms of conflict and betting. Or take their skills and desires to newly formed Chinese leagues where the rest of us will watch via dish and PPV.

And if you think the world lacks that many parents who live vicariously through their kids, there’s not a lot more I can tell you. Because there is a never ending supply of Honey booboo /Tots in Tierra types ready to give little Johnny that one big shot at superstardom and live off the proceeds.


43 posted on 01/10/2013 3:45:24 PM PST by Norm Lenhart
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To: oh8eleven
Banned football for my two sons too after reading that 50% who played football through college ended up with an injury that would affect them for a lifetime.

I have a nephew-in-law who was a star football player. Unfortunately, the injuries he incurred back then are giving him hell today. For years he has suffered from bad knees, both of which have been operated on, to not much relief. He will continue to hurt the rest of his life, and he's only 50.

I learned my lesson at around age 9 playing pick-up football on the school grounds. Got slammed to the ground too many times and suffered from headaches for weeks. Never played again.

They can have that sport, turn it over to water buffaloes. No one will notice the difference.

44 posted on 01/10/2013 4:35:31 PM PST by OldPossum
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To: OldPossum

I should have added that he was a player in high school.


45 posted on 01/10/2013 4:39:44 PM PST by OldPossum
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To: TheRhinelander

“it is amazingly expensive”..which I agree.


46 posted on 01/10/2013 5:30:45 PM PST by max americana (Make the world a better place by punching a liberal in the face)
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To: TheRhinelander

“There are two sports I told my son I would not allow him to play: hockey and football.”

My kids are now beyond that age, but YES, there is NO WAY that I ever would have signed off on those two sports, along with some others.

The only ‘benefit’ that I can see is some early nookie, and they can get that later, when it’s safer.


47 posted on 01/10/2013 5:39:48 PM PST by BobL
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To: Hot Tabasco

Rugby can be a tough, painful, bloody sport but the nature of the rules indeed drastically reduces or eliminates the head-to-head high speed collisions you see in football; in Rugby you’re usually being dragged down from behind.


48 posted on 01/10/2013 6:24:36 PM PST by Strategerist
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To: Norm Lenhart

You’re really hung up on this gladiator thing. And you’re wrong across the board. Gladiator competition was about people getting hurt and killed, modern contact sports are about big hits with no repercussions. It’s an unrealistic desire, but it’s what the crowd wants, they want the players to walk away unscathed from the big hits. Just like in the movies.

What happens with these deaths is it makes the fans gut check. And that’s the last thing any sport wants, when the fans start gut checking they start reconsidering the time and money they spend on silly entertainment.

You want to see contact sport games having financial issues you just have to pay attention. Recently the Arena Football League suspended for a season. The NHL just managed to sign a new CBA which had ugly negotiations because so many teams are losing money. Minor league hockey goes out of business all the time. Remember the XFL? NFL Europe?

Parents that want to live vicariously through their kids need the kids to LIVE in order to do it. Again look at this thread, we’ve got a bunch of parents here that have banned their kids from football. And even if the parents aren’t the lawsuits could have a serious impact on high school football.

The simple fact of the matter is the revelation that players (this is at least the second) who NEVER missed a game due to concussion still managed to get brain damage from the game is really bad news for the league. The game simply has to find a way to change, or it WILL go away.


49 posted on 01/11/2013 7:21:51 AM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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