Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

With almonds' rising revenues, land values soar
Associated Press via San Francisco Chronicle / SFGate.com ^ | Updated 12:42 pm, Saturday, January 12, 2013 | By GOSIA WOZNIACKA, Associated Press

Posted on 01/13/2013 12:00:50 PM PST by thecodont

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Bill Enns, a central California real estate agent specializing in farmland, fields dozens of calls every week from potential buyers. Many want almond, pistachio or walnut orchards — or any land suitable for growing nut trees.

[...]

California's almond industry, which grows about 80 percent of the global almond supply and 100 percent of the domestic supply, saw the most dramatic growth — powered by strong demand from new money-spending middle classes in India and China. The growth has prompted a rush for almond-growing land and pushed almond land values through the roof.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/With-almonds-rising-revenues-land-values-soar-4189081.php#ixzz2Ht4HqjiG

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/With-almonds-rising-revenues-land-values-soar-4189081.php#ixzz2Ht4CiSNF

(Excerpt) Read more at sfgate.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events; US: California
KEYWORDS: agriculture; almonds; trade
Almond joy. California supplies 100 percent of the domestic crop.

Pretty springtime picture at the link.

1 posted on 01/13/2013 12:01:04 PM PST by thecodont
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: thecodont

Thank goodness I have a good prep of almonds. Stocked up when they were on sale.


2 posted on 01/13/2013 12:07:01 PM PST by bgill (We've passed the point of no return. Welcome to Al Amerika.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thecodont

The Chinese have also developed a taste for pecans. That has really raised the cost of pecans in Texas.


3 posted on 01/13/2013 12:10:54 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not really out to get you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thecodont

I just ate a handful of oily salted Spanish almonds. I got hooked on them while in the Canary Islands.

In their natural state, wild almonds are mostly poisonous. It is a mutation that made them edible.


4 posted on 01/13/2013 12:11:33 PM PST by Bon mots (Abu Ghraib: 47 Times on the front page of the NY Times | Benghazi: 2 Times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thecodont
FRESNO, Calif. (AP)

A lot of nuts in FResno. lol

5 posted on 01/13/2013 12:13:27 PM PST by Zuben Elgenubi
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thecodont

Having mechanized havesting has no doubt helped by making the crop more profitable. Cheers for almonds.


6 posted on 01/13/2013 12:20:25 PM PST by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: count-your-change
Having mechanized havesting has no doubt helped by making the crop more profitable. Cheers for almonds.

< California joke >

"Here we grow "a'monds."

"Why is there no "L"?"

"'Cause when you knock them off the tree, you shake the "L" out of them."

< / California joke >

7 posted on 01/13/2013 12:23:55 PM PST by thecodont
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: thecodont
In terms of a "secret group" of people who actually run the world, the largest supplier of almonds and pistachios in the world is Paramount Farms. That is a holding company for Steward and Lynda Resnick. Lynda Resnick was designated an un-indicted co-conspirator for her role in the Pentagon Papers (personal friend of Daniel Ellsburg) and was pursued by prosecutors for two years.

Very rich Leftists based out of Los Angeles.

8 posted on 01/13/2013 12:24:35 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ClearCase_guy

Interesting!


9 posted on 01/13/2013 12:27:07 PM PST by thecodont
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Bon mots; thecodont

I’ve heard that someone who has swallowed cyanide has a breath that smells of almonds. On another note, IIRC, I have seen many photos of almond groves gone to dust because of water shortages caused by the EPA, BLM, and little tiny snail darters. Am I correct?


10 posted on 01/13/2013 12:38:31 PM PST by printhead (Standard & Poor - Poor is the new standard.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: thecodont
California supplies 100 percent of the domestic crop

Commercial? Possibly, but I doubt it. There are some grown in Texas. I have 2 young trees in my orchard. And they are grown in South Texas. But CA has long been the state of fruits & nuts, not necessarily talking about trees.

11 posted on 01/13/2013 12:40:50 PM PST by Texas Fossil
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thecodont

“California joke”

Thanks, we need a reason to laugh right now.


12 posted on 01/13/2013 12:45:31 PM PST by Huskrrrr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: thecodont
Pretty springtime picture at the link.

Actually, it was taken in the middle of winter..

13 posted on 01/13/2013 12:51:34 PM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thecodont

14 posted on 01/13/2013 1:00:22 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dragnet2

Almost looks like a dogwood.


15 posted on 01/13/2013 1:02:53 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: thecodont
These people should not be buying American land.

I don't care if it is legal or "open minded."

I just think it is stupid for Americans to keep handing over the country to foreigners who hate our guts.

16 posted on 01/13/2013 1:14:39 PM PST by caddie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: caddie

They aren’t buying the land, they are buying the almonds. Increasing demand for almonds, esp. in India and China are spurring the increases in farmland value suitable for growing almonds.


17 posted on 01/13/2013 2:14:29 PM PST by Valpal1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: printhead
I’ve heard that someone who has swallowed cyanide has a breath that smells of almonds.

Apparently, not everyone can smell it.

18 posted on 01/13/2013 2:27:19 PM PST by Bon mots (Abu Ghraib: 47 Times on the front page of the NY Times | Benghazi: 2 Times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: thecodont

Toss a rope over the limb of an a’mond tree and hang the jokester.


19 posted on 01/13/2013 3:18:01 PM PST by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: thecodont
The "Fresno Blossom Trail" is a wonderful 62 mile drive in February or March. If you get a chance, be sure to drive it. It's also a great respite from Winter in most parts of the country. Fresno Blossom Trail Photo Tour
20 posted on 01/13/2013 3:35:32 PM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Bon mots
In their natural state, wild almonds are mostly poisonous. It is a mutation that made them edible.

Must have been a very long time ago, they are mentioned in Genesis and other books of the O.T.

I don't know why it's mentioned as though it's not a nut (separately):

a little honey, spices, and myrrh, nuts, and almonds

21 posted on 01/13/2013 3:42:37 PM PST by Graybeard58 ("Civil rights” leader and MSNB-Hee Haw host Al Sharpton - Larry Elder)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Texas Fossil
There are some grown in Texas. I have 2 young trees in my orchard. And they are grown in South Texas.

Unless they have solved the rootstock problem, there isn't any commercial production of note in South Texas. Almond trees thrive, right up to yhe day they get cotton root rot, and die. Good luck with yours -- I've had some viniferera grapes for about seven years, and they have dodged cotton root rot and pierce's disease so far.

22 posted on 01/13/2013 3:46:10 PM PST by Pilsner
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: ProtectOurFreedom

Pretty pictures. Thanks for the link!


23 posted on 01/13/2013 4:24:16 PM PST by thecodont
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Pilsner

Topguard through a T-band, which dispersed the material along the furrow wall. It’s that application method that’s labeled by EPA.

The label also calls for 1 pint to 2 pints per acre and no more than one application per year.

For Texas cotton growers the old chemical works.


24 posted on 01/13/2013 4:32:22 PM PST by Scram1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Pilsner

We have cotton root rot. It make kill the trees in the future, but so far OK. Have been told the same thing about apple trees here.

We will see.


25 posted on 01/13/2013 6:51:12 PM PST by Texas Fossil
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Graybeard58
Yes, it was vey long ago, but we don't know exactly how it was discovered or domesticated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almond

Jared Diamond wrote of this in his books, which is where I learned it.

The almond is native to the Mediterranean climate region of the Middle East, eastward as far as the Indus.[5] It was spread by humans in ancient times along the shores of the Mediterranean into northern Africa and southern Europe and more recently transported to other parts of the world, notably California, United States.[5]

The wild form of domesticated almond grows in parts of the Levant; almonds must first have been taken into cultivation in this region. The fruit of the wild forms contains the glycoside amygdalin, "which becomes transformed into deadly prussic acid (hydrogen cyanide) after crushing, chewing, or any other injury to the seed."[6]notably California, United States.[5]

Almond is considered to be one of the earliest domesticated tree nuts. Wild almonds are bitter, its kernel produces deadly cyanide upon mechanical handling, and eating even a few dozen at one sitting can be fatal. Selection of the sweet type, from the many bitter type in wild, marked the beginning of almond domestication. How man selected the sweet type remains a mystery.[7] It is unclear as to which wild ancestor of almond created the domesticated variety. Ladizinsky suggests the taxon Amygdalus fenzliana (Fritsch) Lipsky is the most likely wild ancestor of almond in part because it is native of Armenia and western Azerbaijan where almond was apparently domesticated.notably California, United States.[5]

While wild almond varieties are toxic, domesticated almonds are not; Jared Diamond argues that a common genetic mutation causes an absence of glycoside amygdalin, and this mutant was grown by early farmers, "at first unintentionally in the garbage heaps, and later intentionally in their orchards".[8] Zohary and Hopf believe that almonds were one of the earliest domesticated fruit trees due to "the ability of the grower to raise attractive almonds from seed. Thus, in spite of the fact that this plant does not lend itself to propagation from suckers or from cuttings, it could have been domesticated even before the introduction of grafting".[6] notably California, United States.[5]

Domesticated almonds appear in the Early Bronze Age (3000–2000 BC) such as the archaeological sites of Numeria (Jordan),[7] or possibly a little earlier. Another well-known archaeological example of the almond is the fruit found in Tutankhamun's tomb in Egypt (c. 1325 BC), probably imported from the Levant.[6] Of the European countries that the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh reported as cultivating almonds, Germany[9] is the northernmost, though the domesticated form can be found as far north as Iceland.[10]


26 posted on 01/14/2013 3:26:01 AM PST by Bon mots (Abu Ghraib: 47 Times on the front page of the NY Times | Benghazi: 2 Times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Bon mots

Thanks, that was interesting and informative. I enjoy reading stuff like that. I guess I’m kind of a nerd at heart.

One more bible reference:

Numbers 17:8

And it came to pass, that on the morrow Moses went into the tabernacle of witness; and, behold, the rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed blossoms, and yielded almonds.


27 posted on 01/14/2013 3:51:53 AM PST by Graybeard58 ("Civil rights” leader and MSNB-Hee Haw host Al Sharpton - Larry Elder)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson