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A jobs crisis? No, itís a skills crisis
New York Daily News ^ | 01/16/2013 | Stanley Litow

Posted on 01/16/2013 7:10:51 AM PST by SeekAndFind

As each month’s unemployment figures show only modest declines, some may mistakenly believe that the United States has a “jobs crisis.” But a closer analysis of the data reveals that our fundamental challenge is a lack of skills, not jobs.

I made this observation at the recent STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Summit convened by the Daily News. But don’t take my word for it. Look at the January 2013 New York City Real Time Jobs Report, which lists local employers that posted the most new ads in the past 90 days and the number of opportunities available.

The current edition of this report documents the existence of more than 300,000 unfilled jobs in the city. My company, IBM, ranked sixth on the list with nearly 1,000 unfilled jobs in New York City alone. JPMorgan Chase led the way with more than 2,000 unfilled positions, and AT&T and Citigroup together had more than 2,000 careers in search of qualified personnel.

A deeper look at the jobs report numbers indicates that 30% of the vacancies — the largest single category — were in the professional, scientific and technical services sector. This is conclusive proof that a focus on preparing our young people for careers in these fields is the crucial economic challenge of our time.

(Excerpt) Read more at nydailynews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: crisis; jobs; skills
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1 posted on 01/16/2013 7:10:55 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind
There are about 10 million Americans with STEM degrees (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) not working in those fields.
2 posted on 01/16/2013 7:15:36 AM PST by kabar
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To: SeekAndFind

You mean a degree in African-American Lesbian Studies won’t get me a job?


3 posted on 01/16/2013 7:17:04 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: kabar

So, why don’t some of them apply to the 30,000 or so vacancies in NY?


4 posted on 01/16/2013 7:17:25 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: dfwgator

RE: You mean a degree in African-American Lesbian Studies won’t get me a job?

Starbucks has plenty of openings for Baristas.


5 posted on 01/16/2013 7:19:22 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: kabar

Perfect response to this article.

Why oh why can’t we find PHD physicists to fill our $50,000 job.


6 posted on 01/16/2013 7:23:49 AM PST by DManA
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To: SeekAndFind
The thing that worries me is this -- the jobs are in science, engineering etc.

i'm a mechanical engineer, but moved to IT (more money!), but the number of engineers, doctors etc. are only 5% or less of the population

Many folks can't take the heavy duty maths involved or the enormous learning required to be a doctor -- and that doesn't make them dumb: my sis-in-law is a professor of Japanese language and culture (and firmly conservative), and brilliant at languages, but show her numbers and she is terrified, she can hardly understand them, no matter how hard she tries

And I have friends who are nowhere near smart enough to be in science or high finance or other fields or even in literature or language etc. or even in business

What's going to happen to these?

We may complain about outsourcing to China, but there is also the threat of robotisation -- a car factory that employed a thousand people can now run with just a few dozen skilled technicians.

I probably put lots of people out of a job with balance transfer and insurance online applications

What's going to happen to the middle 80% IQ people?

There are only so few skilled jobs like hairdressers, plumbers etc (and don't get me wrong, I have a lot of respect for a good plumber and if I was cutting hair, well, we'd look like we were in the 80s)

7 posted on 01/16/2013 7:24:38 AM PST by Cronos (Middle English prest, priest, Old English pruost, Late Latin presbyter, Latin presbuteros)
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To: SeekAndFind
You see, in a Republican administration it's called a "jobs crisis". In a Democrat administration, it's a "skills crisis".

Therefore, in a Republican administration, it's the fault of the Republican. In a Democrat administration, it's YOUR fault!

8 posted on 01/16/2013 7:27:47 AM PST by Obadiah (Those who will not hear the messengers of peace, shall be made to hear the messengers of war.)
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To: SeekAndFind; dfwgator

yet even those baristas will have to be reasonably skilled and know different types of coffees.


9 posted on 01/16/2013 7:28:07 AM PST by Cronos (Middle English prest, priest, Old English pruost, Late Latin presbyter, Latin presbuteros)
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To: SeekAndFind
This is conclusive proof that a focus on preparing our young people for careers in these fields is the crucial economic challenge of our time.

No. The crucial economic challenge of our time is getting young folks skilled in readin', writin', 'rithmetic, to learn the value of hard work and to plan for the future. That is more basic and has a better effect than continuing to teach them teach them lesbian literature themes and telling them, "Oh, you might want to take some hard sciences, too." The author was a high mucky muck in the New York city schools. If he retired from the school system instead of resigning in disgust, then he is probably part of the problem.

10 posted on 01/16/2013 7:30:46 AM PST by 17th Miss Regt
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To: DManA; kabar
There are a lot of skilled workers who have been lured out of the not-very-well-paid STEM occupations to work in high finance and elsewhere, and he suggests that an increase in wages would bring many back into STEM activities.2

Tell me about it -- but the money in STEM will never match high-finance and it was way out of level in the early 2000s when I joined the workforce

Guys I knew who did an MBA went into Goldman and were earning multiples of what I was earning in IT -- and I was earning much more than my classmates were earning in mech jobs.

11 posted on 01/16/2013 7:30:54 AM PST by Cronos (Middle English prest, priest, Old English pruost, Late Latin presbyter, Latin presbuteros)
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To: SeekAndFind

This rings true for me. My three 20 something daughters all live in Seattle. Their “stories” are as follows:

Daughter 1: no college but follows fathers footsteps (IT), eventually getting Business Analysis training and is now a well paid BA.
Daughter 2: Degree in Accounting and is now a well paid accountant.

Daughter 3: Civil engineering degree and is now a well paid engineer. The youngest is only 24, the oldest just turned 30.

I thought they were just “fortunate” but now that I think of it, their cousins that attained no skills - just worked the “retail counter” are really struggling.


12 posted on 01/16/2013 7:32:06 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: SeekAndFind
Not only the wealth, but the independence and security of a country, appear to be materially connected with the prosperity of manufactures. Every nation, with a view to those great objects, ought to endeavor to possess within itself all the essentials of national supply. These comprise the means of subsistence, habitation, clothing and defense.

— Alexander Hamilton
Definitely a dearth of jobs rather than skills.
13 posted on 01/16/2013 7:32:31 AM PST by Olog-hai
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To: kabar

Only a shortage of US citizens that can satisfy impossible-to-fill-by-anyone requirements.

That aside, if companies find a shortage, they could always train the difference and encourage people to stay for longer terms.


14 posted on 01/16/2013 7:40:48 AM PST by setha (It is past time for the United States to take back what the world took away.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Here in Ohio they can’t fill the gas field jobs because no one can pass a drug test. But that’s a different problem.


15 posted on 01/16/2013 7:41:16 AM PST by RadiationRomeo (Step into my mind and glimpse the madness that is me)
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To: SeekAndFind
Maybe the wages have been reduced to unattractive levels because we are bringing in immigrants to do those jobs at lower wages. In NYC you need a much higher level of wages to just be considered middle class. It has to do with the cost of living as well as the onerous taxes imposed by NYC as well as the state of NY.

• Each year, some 200,000 additional skilled foreign workers are admitted through a variety of existing visa programs.

• At least one million skilled nonimmigrant workers are in the United States at any one time.

There are numerous indications in the high-tech fields that there is a surplus of both domestic and potential foreign workers in the U.S. labor markets. If a firm is hiring at the bachelor’s level, the Bureau of Labor Statistics tells us that in June 2011 there were 2,118,000 unemployed residents of the United States with bachelor’s degrees or more. There are some duds in that group, undoubtedly, but a lot of skills as well.

Another way of looking at this situation is to examine what America’s colleges and universities are doing to produce graduates in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields and to compare that to the STEM workforce, as Hal Salzman, a professor of public policy at Rutgers has done.

Salzman puts the total STEM workforce at 4.8 million. That is roughly one-third of the 15.7 million workers who hold at least one science or engineering degree.

There are a lot of skilled workers who have been lured out of the not-very-well-paid STEM occupations to work in high finance and elsewhere, and he suggests that an increase in wages would bring many back into STEM activities.

Supposing the employer — and many of them operate this way — would prefer to ignore the two million-plus unemployed graduates in the country, and ignore the 10 million or so STEM-trained people employed outside STEM occupations, and wants to hire foreign workers. Well, there are plenty of opportunities to do that through, for instance, the numerically limited aspects of the H-1B program. Of the 85,000 numerically limited slots in that program for the coming fiscal year 57,900 of them remained open on June 17, 2011, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

In addition there are numerically unlimited opportunities to hire skilled foreign labor in the L, J, O, and F-1 (with OPT) categories that are described below. In the last-named category the employer gets a bonus of as much as $10,000 for hiring a foreign graduate of an American university rather than a citizen or a green card graduate of the same university with the same skills. That may be hard to believe, but it is the case.

16 posted on 01/16/2013 7:41:16 AM PST by kabar
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To: Cronos

When I was a computer programmer I ended up working with two guys at two separate contracts that were ex-chemists. I asked them why they went into programming and both said it was all about money and opportunity. Interestingly, one had worked in the petrolium industry.

There is another article I read that said the real problem is not that there are not enough people. Rather, there are not enough people that will work for what they are willing to pay. This analogy was used: These companies saying there is a shortage of skilled workers is like a car buyer saying there is a shortage of cars to buy that meet their needs. There isn’t. What they mean is there are no cars that meet their needs that are within their budget.

Cheapskates can never find what they are looking for.


17 posted on 01/16/2013 7:41:59 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Cronos

Another factor, the really good workers aren’t content to put all that effort in for the benefit of others. They will start their own business the first chance they get.

So if you ask me big business sees definite advantages to government policies that act like a boot on the neck of small business.


18 posted on 01/16/2013 7:42:52 AM PST by DManA
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To: SeekAndFind

BS

It’s about uncertainty in the marketplace and what the gubmit demandsaand the confusion surrounding it.

Get out of the way and simplify life.


19 posted on 01/16/2013 7:43:38 AM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: setha

That’s a good point. There was a time that business took on some of the burden of training their work force. That was when an employee was considered a valuable asset.

Now they are commodities bought on the open market.


20 posted on 01/16/2013 7:47:05 AM PST by DManA
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To: cuban leaf

My son got a relatively generic business degree, and started out putting tires on cars at a tire store because that’s all he could find. Nine months later he was hired on to run shipping operations at a large plumbing/HVAC wholesaler. It’s not really high-skilled, and it’s not paying a huge salary. But it’s a good company and it’s a start. I really believe he would not have the job he does if he’d just been working a retail counter or in a restaurant. It was more that he showed that he is a steady, reliable employee willing to work hard and get his hands dirty in addition to having some smarts.

Good jobs of all types are out there. Good employees? Maybe not so much.


21 posted on 01/16/2013 7:48:00 AM PST by henkster ("The people who count the votes decide everything." -Joseph Stalin)
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To: SeekAndFind

People need to develop a knowledge and skills portfolio that is just as diversified as a financial portfolio. We need to start emphasizing this in school....you can’t just spend all of your time studying and training to do one thing.


22 posted on 01/16/2013 7:48:00 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: setha; SeekAndFind
We are told we need to import hundreds of thousands of high school dropouts each year through our immigration policy that brings in 1.2 million LEGAL immigrants a year with 25% of the adults lacking even a high school degree because they do jobs Americans won't do.

Now we are being told that we need to bring in hundreds of thousands of skilled workers to do jobs Americans can't do.

In the meantime, we have 23 million Americans looking for fulltime employment and 50% of college graduates age 25-29 can't find jobs in their field.

We are a nation of 315 million people and we can't educate and train enough people to fill 4.8 million STEM jobs?

23 posted on 01/16/2013 7:49:47 AM PST by kabar
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To: Olog-hai

We can make everything here, but still, automation means that it won’t create nearly as many jobs as it used to. Look at how many people used to be employed in agriculture, what used to take hundreds of people to do, can now be accomplished with a handful........now agriculture employment amounts to around 1 percent, where in the past it was at least 60%.


24 posted on 01/16/2013 7:50:53 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: RadiationRomeo
Here in Ohio they can’t fill the gas field jobs because no one can pass a drug test. But that’s a different problem.

Same down here in the SE NM oil patch - an estimated 20% fail and random* drug tests for existing employees catch more.

But there are loads of help wanted ads for skilled employees, mainly trades persons -- welders, machinists, electricians. And IT is becoming more important as companies go to remote technology to collect production data from their remote locations.

* Last year I got called off a job just before the end of the day and told to report to the medical center to pee in the cup. There was a line waiting to do the same.

25 posted on 01/16/2013 7:51:37 AM PST by CedarDave (Matt Damon is to natural gas fracking as Jane Fonda is to nuclear power generation.)
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To: cuban leaf

The time is quickly approaching where there will no longer be people who do nothing but programming, it will just be another aspect of their normal job. Think about accountants who write their own Excel Macros, eventually that will expand to more conventional types of programming.


26 posted on 01/16/2013 7:53:21 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator

It’ll still employ more people than at present.


27 posted on 01/16/2013 7:53:49 AM PST by Olog-hai
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To: dfwgator

I started out in ‘83 as a COBOL IMS programmer. One of the great things about it is that that single skill springboarded me to a very lucrative career without having to contend with competing tech. Sure, I had to learn CICS in the early 90’s, but CICS is to IMS DC what Ford is to Chevy. It’s so similar that it was a piece of cake.

But then the world of servers and all to 4th generation languages popped up. It got so there may be lots of jobs were out there, but only a handful were for your “specific” skillset. But us Cobol guys just kept grinding away. $27 an hour. $35 an hour. $45 an hour. Then $55, $75 and, finally, $125 an hour. And it was then that the influx of immigrants started impacting the Mainframe programming world.

It still pays pretty well if you are an old timer, but I moved on to communication intensive stuff (i.e. BA and PM). That is harder to outsource - with the equivalent pay deflation. ;-)

I used to say to kids in the early 90’s that iin the future, you can’t say one of these things, you will not be able to afford your own home:

1. I own my own company.
2. I’m in sales.
3. You can’t pull a person of average intelligence off the street and teach them my job in a month.

And none of those three are a guarantee.


28 posted on 01/16/2013 8:09:01 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: dfwgator

Excel Macros, eventually that will expand to more conventional types of programming.


I’ve worked with guys who started programming just like that. However, they had to attend formal training to be “good” programmers. Interestingly, a lot of programmers could not write an Excel Macro to save their soul. It’s kinda funny. I worked with some cobol programmers who refused to embrace any new technology.

My skills with Microsoft Office are, to me, nothing special, but I’ve worked on contracts where they thought I was an MS Office guru. You would not believe how many people use MS Office daily but don’t even know what a macro is.

They’re not dumb. They’re just too busy doing their job and using it the way they use it to realize the functionality is there and may help them. I used Word macros to remediate Microfocus COBOL code for Y2K. It was easy, but I’d almost have to re-learn it today to do it now. Actually, I’d probably have to fiddle with it for an hour or so. ;-)


29 posted on 01/16/2013 8:15:42 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: CedarDave

What’s worse, 20% less employees or 20% employees that use drugs on the weekends or after work?


30 posted on 01/16/2013 8:32:21 AM PST by stuartcr ("I upraded my moral compass to a GPS, to keep up with the times.")
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To: kabar

Not very many STEM jobs can justify the salaries paid to top STEM graduates working in finance. There really wouldn’t be much point to outbidding finance firms for such above-market-wage STEM jobs anyway.

Plain old market supply and demand works very well, thank you.


31 posted on 01/16/2013 8:45:21 AM PST by 9YearLurker
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To: 17th Miss Regt
...readin', writin', 'rithmetic...

Right On! Right On! Right On!

I teach and tutor math and science in rural Minnesota which has a reputation as being one of the best educated populations in the nation and I find that scary as...

You would be astonished at how many young people cannot manipulate even small signed integer numbers. Fractions are beyond comprehension.

The school systems do, however, provide enormous bandwidth to play computer games when they are supposed to be working.

The primary function of our educational system is babysitting.

32 posted on 01/16/2013 8:53:16 AM PST by Aevery_Freeman (Proud Thought Criminal since 1984)
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To: Aevery_Freeman

No, the primary function of our education system is indoctrination.


33 posted on 01/16/2013 8:56:14 AM PST by 3boysdad (The very elect.)
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To: stuartcr; CedarDave; RadiationRomeo
What’s worse, 20% less employees or 20% employees that use drugs on the weekends or after work?

Good question. "Tested positive" does not always mean "under the influence and unable to safely do the job."

34 posted on 01/16/2013 8:56:59 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: SeekAndFind

The chickens are coming home to roost. In the 80’s it was all high tech manfacturing jobs, engineers were in high demand, and students went to school to learn those skills. Enter the 90’s, when all of those engineers and skilled trades watched their jobs get shipped to china and mexico by the ‘effin boatload, and were told you can’t compete against cheap foriegn labor, so get used to it because those jobs are never coming back. So through the 2000’s foreign interests gobbled up US manufacturing while the people here were sold on getting degrees in bullshit fields, all along colleges making money hand over fist by peddling useless dergrees, and perpetuating the myth that you have to go to them to get a toehold in a lucrative job. The quest for profits at all costs has cost our industrial infrastructure dearly, and that has reprecussions to future generations who have lost the ability to make, grow, and build things for themselves.


35 posted on 01/16/2013 9:02:31 AM PST by factoryrat (We are the producers, the creators. Grow it, mine it, build it.)
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To: kabar
Reminds me of a joke:

"Do these pants make me look fat?"

"No, your ass makes you look fat."

36 posted on 01/16/2013 9:05:58 AM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: 9YearLurker
Not very many STEM jobs can justify the salaries paid to top STEM graduates working in finance. There really wouldn’t be much point to outbidding finance firms for such above-market-wage STEM jobs anyway.

You are missing the point and only using part of the professor's assertion, "There are a lot of skilled workers who have been lured out of the not-very-well-paid STEM occupations to work in high finance and elsewhere, and he suggests that an increase in wages would bring many back into STEM activities."

It is false choice to say that you either increase STEM wages to compete against those working in high finance or just allow STEM jobs to go unfilled.

Plain old market supply and demand works very well, thank you.

The problem is that it is not a level playing field. We are importing cheaper labor to fill many STEM jobs, which depresses wages across the board in those fields. And there is an endless supply of cheap, skilled labor from abroad. Our immigration policies bear no correlation to our real job needs.

During the past four years, the average household income has declined by $4,500 or almost 10%. If there was truly a shortage of labor, skilled or unskilled, we would see wages increasing. They are not. They are actually going down and have been for decades.

Over the past 40 years, a period in which U.S. GDP per capita more than doubled after adjusting for inflation, the annual earnings of the median prime-aged male have actually fallen by 28 percent. Indeed, males at the middle of the wage distribution now earn about the same as their counterparts in the 1950s! This decline reflects both stagnant wages for men on the job, and the fact that, compared with 1969, three times as many men of working age don’t work at all.

37 posted on 01/16/2013 9:13:48 AM PST by kabar
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To: kabar
There are about 10 million Americans with STEM degrees (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) not working in those fields.

Thank-you !!!
38 posted on 01/16/2013 9:18:12 AM PST by khelus
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To: SeekAndFind

Except the “Bill Gates” billionaires lie to Congress and say there aren’t enough qualified Americans willing to do the work, can ‘we’ get some work visas (and here’s $10,000 to the government for each employee we are giving half-wages)?

Not to mention the offshore workers who then smuggle their foreign authored million dollar code into the US via the internet without paying importation taxes.

Not enough skilled workers my ass. A degree won’t keep your job stateside with upper management trying to shave off dollars.


39 posted on 01/16/2013 9:25:19 AM PST by a fool in paradise (America 2013 - STUCK ON STUPID)
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To: Cronos

The McCormick reaper put thousands of farm hands out of business. What happened to them?

Humans adjust.


40 posted on 01/16/2013 9:35:30 AM PST by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: Olog-hai; All
"Every nation, with a view to those great objects, ought to endeavor to possess within itself all the essentials of national supply. These comprise the means of subsistence, habitation, clothing and defense." -- Alexander Hamilton

You add: Definitely a dearth of jobs rather than skills.

A dearth of jobs because environmental, health, and labor regulations make outlaws of Americans who try go provide "subsistance, habitation, clothing, and defense."

Few are fully aware -- yet -- of how profoundly the environmentalist agenda is in the process of shackling Americans from engaging in FOOD PRODUCTION, the most basic of human rights and needs. Farming and fishing (not to mention textile production for clothing) are becoming virtually illegal due to onerous regulation. Not long ago, all you needed to make a living as a fisherman was a boat, some knowledge, and some self-discipline. It was your GOD GIVEN RIGHT to fish if you wanted to, or to grow food and sell it if you wanted to, or to invent and manufacture a widget convenience that can make people's lives easier.

The only reason -- the ONLY reason -- there is such a huge market for cheap Chinese goods, is because mostly unelected bureaucrats in government PROHBIBIT Americans from manufacturing them here. The only reason energy is so expensive, and the only reason food prices may soon follow, is because government PROHBITS amd makes outlaws of Americans who should be producing the food and energy here.

And creating the JOBS here. Where skills are rewarded.

41 posted on 01/16/2013 9:54:01 AM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Finny

Thanks; excellent elaboration on the point I was making.

Hamilton’s point in that paragraph I quoted had to do with the vulnerability and dependence of the then-nascent USA upon other nations for such things. Not a call for autarky, but for independence in those things.


42 posted on 01/16/2013 9:58:09 AM PST by Olog-hai
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To: SeekAndFind

Who said that education is the civil rights issue of the 21st century?


43 posted on 01/16/2013 10:22:32 AM PST by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: Olog-hai

Amen.


44 posted on 01/16/2013 10:28:26 AM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: kabar

Of course men’s wages haven’t risen as rapidly as wages across the board—they used to be paid a premium for simply being men!

But those wage studies under-report actual increases, because most such jobs include health benefits that have been rising far faster than the rate of inflation.

Really, what is the point of trying to lure back STEM-educated workers who can be more productive elsewhere?

And our entire country benefits when smart and skilled immigrants come to work here. It is less capable, unskilled immigrants who are a drag on the economy and our standard of living.


45 posted on 01/16/2013 11:25:48 AM PST by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker
Of course men’s wages haven’t risen as rapidly as wages across the board—they used to be paid a premium for simply being men!

Did you read the study at the link? How could you come to that conclusion?

Really, what is the point of trying to lure back STEM-educated workers who can be more productive elsewhere?

Are they really more productive elsewhere or is it a problem of depressed wages or hiring cheaper foreign workers>

And our entire country benefits when smart and skilled immigrants come to work here. It is less capable, unskilled immigrants who are a drag on the economy and our standard of living.

Our country benefits when smart and skilled immigrants come here, but there has to be limits. And we must calculate the impact on our own citizens who must compete with them for jobs. Where does our primary responsibility lie? The decade ending in 2010 was the highest in our history in terms of legal immigration(13.9 million) but during the same period we suffered a net loss of jobs if 400,000.


46 posted on 01/16/2013 11:41:51 AM PST by kabar
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To: kabar

Unfortunately the majority of even our legal immigrants have been of the low-skill variety. It is that heavy welfare/EITC/Medicaid population that is a drag on the economy. If we had a more skilled workforce—but truly we must recognize many IT jobs are only of the mid-skill, commodity variety—we wouldn’t see as much offshoring.

A reasonably priced but highly skilled American IT worker is still worth at least a couple of low-cost offshore types.


47 posted on 01/16/2013 11:56:45 AM PST by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker
Unfortunately the majority of even our legal immigrants have been of the low-skill variety.

Yes and do we need 1.2 million legal immigrants every year--87% of whom are minorities as defined by the USG?

It is that heavy welfare/EITC/Medicaid population that is a drag on the economy.

57% of immigrant headed households with children are on welfare.

If we had a more skilled workforce—but truly we must recognize many IT jobs are only of the mid-skill, commodity variety—we wouldn’t see as much offshoring.

The reality is that you can go offshore and get just as qualified a workforce as in the US at a much cheaper cost. Moreover, you can equip your factories and facilities with the most advanced technology to make your workers just as productive. I have seen it firsthand in China and India.

A reasonably priced but highly skilled American IT worker is still worth at least a couple of low-cost offshore types.

If only it were so.

48 posted on 01/16/2013 1:27:18 PM PST by kabar
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To: 9YearLurker
It doesn't help when even those “highly skilled” are even being passed up for work. In addition, existing guest worker programs result in more fraud by redefining the required skillset to something that no US citizen could ever have (and in one case, finding that was the goal). Scrap the existing guest worker systems(which usually do not result in assimilation), enforce the laws on the books, and see what we can do without that distortion.

Cutting out those “commodity” jobs or making them undesirable to citizens will only serve to cut off the entry points to the higher-skill work later on.

49 posted on 01/16/2013 3:05:18 PM PST by setha (It is past time for the United States to take back what the world took away.)
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To: cuban leaf; dfwgator
I won't agree you with dfw that programming jobs will go away. The simpler ones will -- kind of like how we now tinker with our bicycles

But to program at an enterprise level requires some planning skills -- e.g. people like Ruby-on-Rails quick turn-around, but that application can't scale up.

50 posted on 01/17/2013 12:11:40 AM PST by Cronos (Middle English prest, priest, Old English pruost, Late Latin presbyter, Latin presbuteros)
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