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Cardinals Hall of Famer Stan Musial Dies at Age 92
ABC News and Associated Press ^ | ST. LOUIS January 20, 2013 | By R.B. FALLSTROM AP Sports Writer

Posted on 01/19/2013 6:01:28 PM PST by bd476

Stan Musial, the St. Louis Cardinals star with the corkscrew stance and too many batting records to fit on his Hall of Fame plaque, died Saturday. He was 92.

Stan the Man was so revered in St. Louis that he has two statues outside Busch Stadium — one just wouldn't do him justice. He was one of baseball's greatest hitters, shining in the mold of Ted Williams and Joe DiMaggio even without the bright lights of the big city.

Musial won seven National League batting titles, was a three-time MVP and helped the Cardinals capture three World Series championships in the 1940s.

The Cardinals announced Musial's death in a news release. They said he died Saturday evening at his home in Ladue surrounded by family. The team said Musial's son-in-law, Dave Edmonds, informed the club of Musial's death.

"We have lost the most beloved member of the Cardinals family," team chairman William DeWitt Jr. said. "Stan Musial was the greatest player in Cardinals history and one of the best players in the history of baseball."

Musial was the second baseball Hall of Famer who died Saturday. Longtime Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver also passed away, at age 82.

Musial spent his entire 22-year career with the Cardinals and made the All-Star team 24 times — baseball held two All-Star games each summer for a few seasons.

A pitcher in the low minors until he injured his arm, Musial turned to playing the outfield and first base. It was a stroke of luck for him, as he went on to hit .331 with 475 home runs before retiring in 1963.


(Excerpt) Read more at abcnews.go.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; US: Missouri; US: Pennsylvania
KEYWORDS: musial
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1 posted on 01/19/2013 6:01:43 PM PST by bd476
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To: All

During the recent days of sports scandals, Stan Musial was a real hero, an untarnished one.

God Bless him and his dear family and friends.


2 posted on 01/19/2013 6:05:34 PM PST by bd476
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To: bd476

He is maybe the last of the stars from an era when baseball was truly the American pass time.

I grew up in the 50s and can remember when just about any town of any size at all had a professional baseball team. It was good baseball too.


3 posted on 01/19/2013 6:08:18 PM PST by yarddog (One shot one miss.)
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To: bd476

Thank you Stan for giving us many years of great baseball.


4 posted on 01/19/2013 6:08:30 PM PST by doc1019
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To: bd476
Amazing guy. Before my time, really, but I remember being very young and learning about him as one of the all-time greats. I knew he was still with us, but I also knew his time must be coming. Now it has.

RIP

5 posted on 01/19/2013 6:08:46 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Nothing will change until after the war.)
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To: bd476

Go Cards!!


6 posted on 01/19/2013 6:08:52 PM PST by GoCards (I am a Hobbit)
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To: bd476


One of the delights of my youth was watching Stan the Man Musial at bat in many All Star Games with his unique stance. Rest in Peace, Stan Musial




Keep Faith with the Fallen of Benghazi! Let the Obama Regime, for once, tell the Truth!

Fiat Justitia, Ruat Coelum!

Genuflectimus non ad principem sed ad Principem Pacis!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

7 posted on 01/19/2013 6:10:44 PM PST by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: All
Thank You, Mr. Musial

RIP

8 posted on 01/19/2013 6:11:37 PM PST by tomkat ( .. shall NOT be infringed)
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To: GoCards

Indeed !


9 posted on 01/19/2013 6:12:23 PM PST by tomkat ( .. shall NOT be infringed)
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To: bd476

10 posted on 01/19/2013 6:14:10 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono

IBHWBM (In Before He Will Be Missed!)


11 posted on 01/19/2013 6:15:45 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Me too. He was my favorite ballplayer when I was a kid


12 posted on 01/19/2013 6:16:46 PM PST by Oldhunk
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To: yarddog
yarddog wrote: "He is maybe the last of the stars from an era when baseball was truly the American pass time. I grew up in the 50s and can remember when just about any town of any size at all had a professional baseball team. It was good baseball too."

Those days seem so wholesome looking back in time. He set some great records while retaining his squeaky clean image.

13 posted on 01/19/2013 6:20:25 PM PST by bd476
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To: bd476

Not many heroes of my Summers Past are left.
Although a die hard Brooklyn Dodger fan in the midst of NY Yankee and a smattering of NY Giants fans, I still held a lot of respect for many of the opposition, particularly “The Man”.

He was married 71 years.....and USN Vet, missing the 1945 season.

RIP as you join the other ‘Boys Of Summer’.


14 posted on 01/19/2013 6:22:21 PM PST by xrmusn (6/98 "It is virtually impossible to clean the pond as long as the pigs are still crapping in it")
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To: Oldhunk
When I was a boy - the All Star Game always featured Stan Musial and Ted Williams. In my personal opinion those two gents had lots more class than the overpaid millionaires who now inhabit the major leagues.



Keep Faith with the Fallen of Benghazi! Let the Obama Regime, for once, tell the Truth!

Fiat Justitia, Ruat Coelum!

Genuflectimus non ad principem sed ad Principem Pacis!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

15 posted on 01/19/2013 6:23:20 PM PST by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: doc1019
doc1019 wrote: "Thank you Stan for giving us many years of great baseball."

Amen!


16 posted on 01/19/2013 6:24:14 PM PST by bd476
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To: ConorMacNessa

The Man


17 posted on 01/19/2013 6:24:53 PM PST by morphing libertarian
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To: bd476

90 things to love about The Man

http://www.stltoday.com/sports/baseball/professional/things-to-love-about-the-man/article_12a02ef7-b9d3-5cec-91f8-843d44412f13.html

Sad Regards

alfa6 ;>}


18 posted on 01/19/2013 6:25:57 PM PST by alfa6
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To: BluesDuke

sad ping


19 posted on 01/19/2013 6:26:16 PM PST by tomkat ( .. shall NOT be infringed)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Lucky you! That must have been a real treat to see him at bat.
Thanks for posting his photo.


20 posted on 01/19/2013 6:26:34 PM PST by bd476
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To: bd476

When I was 5-6-7 years old, one of our few recreational activities was watching the Panama City Fliers play at Lion’s Park.

It was the class D Alabama/Florida League. I still have an official Alabama/Florida League Spalding baseball autographed by the entire team. Probably 1953. My older sister got the groundskeeper to give her the gall and she got all the players to sign it.

One of the players for Pensacola was Cal Ripkin Sr. One of the Panama City players was Chase Riddle who I think set some minor league records before being a scout for the St. Louis Cardinals. After he retired he led Troy University to a couple of national championships.


21 posted on 01/19/2013 6:28:50 PM PST by yarddog (One shot one miss.)
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To: JoeProBono

Joe, thanks for posting those photos of Stan Musial.


22 posted on 01/19/2013 6:30:48 PM PST by bd476
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To: bd476
Not a baseball fan ... was it 82 or 92?
In the scheme of things it doesn't really matter ... I'm hearing/reading 82 ... which was it?
23 posted on 01/19/2013 6:33:35 PM PST by BluH2o
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To: bd476

Hat tip to one of the greats.


24 posted on 01/19/2013 6:36:41 PM PST by logitech (Who's here so vile, that will not love his country? If any speak, for him I have offended)
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To: bd476

A piece of my youth is now gone. May he join the others in the field of dreams, to play his game forever.


25 posted on 01/19/2013 6:37:04 PM PST by NTHockey (Rules of engagement #1: Take no prisoners)
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To: xrmusn
xrmusn wrote: "Not many heroes of my Summers Past are left. Although a die hard Brooklyn Dodger fan in the midst of NY Yankee and a smattering of NY Giants fans, I still held a lot of respect for many of the opposition, particularly "The Man". He was married 71 years.....and USN Vet, missing the 1945 season. RIP as you join the other 'Boys Of Summer'.

One couldn't help but admire him. His dear wife passed away last year. I didn't know he served in the US Navy, that's his character though. He was a real legend but those who met him said he was very humble and down to earth.

26 posted on 01/19/2013 6:38:26 PM PST by bd476
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To: BluH2o

Musial was 92. Earl Weaver also died today; he was 82.


27 posted on 01/19/2013 6:41:42 PM PST by twister881
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To: bd476

I *was* a baseball fan — Kansas City A’s, Washington Senators, San Diego Padres. Got it from my Mom, who loved the game.

In elementary school, the teacher would bring a radio so we could listen to Opening Day.

Drugs, bad behavior, and exorbitant prices ruined if for me.


28 posted on 01/19/2013 6:49:26 PM PST by twister881
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To: alfa6

Alfa6, thank you for sharing the link to that very interesting article about Stan the Man.
He set good standards for baseball and for life.


29 posted on 01/19/2013 6:53:11 PM PST by bd476
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To: bd476
Baltimore Oriole Manager, Earl Weaver died of heart attack today at the age of 82.

Earl Weaver
30 posted on 01/19/2013 6:58:03 PM PST by Brown Deer (Pray for 0bama. Psalm 109:8)
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To: twister881

OK ... thanks.


31 posted on 01/19/2013 6:59:05 PM PST by BluH2o
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To: bd476

This is what Bill James wrote about Musial in his first edition of THe Historical Baseball Abstract:

“The image of Musial seems to be fading quickly…. It doesn’t seem that the image is very sharp, that anybody really knows what made him different…

“What he was was a ballplayer. He didn’t spit at fans, he didn’t get into fights in nightclubs, he didn’t marry anybody famous. He hustled. You look at his career totals of doubles and triples, and they’ll remind you of something that was accepted while he was active, and has been largely forgotten since: Stan Musial was one player who always left the batter’s box on a dead run.”

In that book he rated Musial ahead of Williams as the best left-fielder of all time, although he did reverse that decision in the second edition without much explanation. I would rather have had Musial on my team than Williams.


32 posted on 01/19/2013 7:06:37 PM PST by Gil4 (Progressives - Trying to repeal the Law of Supply and Demand since 1848)
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To: twister881
wister881 wrote: "I *was* a baseball fan — Kansas City A's, Washington Senators, San Diego Padres. Got it from my Mom, who loved the game. In elementary school, the teacher would bring a radio so we could listen to Opening Day. Drugs, bad behavior, and exorbitant prices ruined if for me."

I was too, couldn't help but be a fan of the greats, that is if you lived in my neighborhood with a nearby baseball diamond and a radio.


33 posted on 01/19/2013 7:07:57 PM PST by bd476
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To: Brown Deer
Brown Deer wrote: " Baltimore Oriole Manager, Earl Weaver died of heart attack today at the age of 82."

Thanks Brown Deer. More sad news. May Earl rest in peace.


34 posted on 01/19/2013 7:12:19 PM PST by bd476
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To: Gil4
Did anyone on FR see "The Man" play in person?

I refinanced my house back in the late 90's. The loan officer and I ended up talking baseball. He had seen Stan as a player. We got into a fascinating discussion about batting and batting stances. Being a young guy, I of course talked about Joe Morgan and the chicken arm flap, and the Pete Rose crouch. He showed me the Stan Musial "peekaboo" stance. I had never seen it.

It was cool. The loan guy was in his 70's at the time and knew every big time 1940s and 50s player's batting technique.

35 posted on 01/19/2013 7:16:54 PM PST by boop ("You don't look so bad, here's another")
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To: bd476

I had the honor of meeting him many times. A true gentleman, loved his fans.

RIP Sir.

We will all see you soon. Maybe you can show us a few things. I so look forward to playing some ball!


36 posted on 01/19/2013 7:18:43 PM PST by Steve Newton (And the Wolves will learn what we have shown before-We love our sheep we dogs of war. Vaughn)
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To: bd476
More sad news. May Earl rest in peace.

I wonder......are there any umpires in heaven?

If there are, how will Earl respond?

37 posted on 01/19/2013 7:19:22 PM PST by okie01 (The Mainstream Media: IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
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To: boop

I saw him

First thing I asked my dad was why was his stance so funny. I got one of his bats cracked in a foul.

I used it for a rock bat.

Yeah

I know


38 posted on 01/19/2013 7:23:21 PM PST by Steve Newton (And the Wolves will learn what we have shown before-We love our sheep we dogs of war. Vaughn)
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To: Gil4
Gil4 wrote: "This is what Bill James wrote about Musial in his first edition of THe Historical Baseball Abstract:

'The image of Musial seems to be fading quickly…. It doesn't seem that the image is very sharp, that anybody really knows what made him different…

What he was was a ballplayer. He didn't spit at fans, he didn't get into fights in nightclubs, he didn't marry anybody famous. He hustled. You look at his career totals of doubles and triples, and they'll remind you of something that was accepted while he was active, and has been largely forgotten since: Stan Musial was one player who always left the batter's box on a dead run.'


In that book he rated Musial ahead of Williams as the best left-fielder of all time, although he did reverse that decision in the second edition without much explanation. I would rather have had Musial on my team than Williams. "


Thank you, Gil4. Stan Musial was one of a kind. I sure hope God sends us another Musial with similar decent, mature, down to earth qualities soon.

Coincidentally "The Natural" just began on a local station.



39 posted on 01/19/2013 7:25:05 PM PST by bd476
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To: boop

My husband saw him many times in person. And when my husband was still a uni student in the late 1960’s, Musial had a restaurant in St. Louis and would be there most of the time. Once my husband met Musial at the restaurant, and, as usual for anyone who asked, Musial signed a photo of himself for my husband.


40 posted on 01/19/2013 7:34:12 PM PST by Aussiebabe
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To: bd476

Last year I read a book about Stan Musial called Stan The Man. I do remember as a 10 year old kid seeing the Braves and Cardinals play an old timers game in 1971 and I saw on the cardinals side Stan Musial, Dizzy Dean and I think Ducky Medwick and Frankie Frisch were there as well in addition to old time Braves like Eddie Matthews and Spahn and Sain. From what we know no one had a bad word to say about Stan Musial although I geuss he and Joe Garogiola kind parted ways after a testy business relationship. May he RIP.


41 posted on 01/19/2013 7:35:03 PM PST by fkabuckeyesrule
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To: bd476

I saw him play at Wrigley Field. God bless him. No finer man ever stepped into the batter’s box!


42 posted on 01/19/2013 7:35:45 PM PST by Doc Savage ("I've shot people I like a lot more,...for a lot less!" Raylan Givins)
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To: Gil4
...he rated Musial ahead of Williams as the best left-fielder of all time,...

There was a time where Musial got distracted and didn't immediately notice play had resumed. A fly ball was hit to left field and Musial didn't have his glove on. Musial ran the ball down and caught it BARE-HANDED!

43 posted on 01/19/2013 7:47:26 PM PST by stboz
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To: boop
Did anyone on FR see "The Man" play in person?

Yes, I saw him a number of times at old Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, in the late 50s/early 60s towards the end of his career. I understood I was watching a legend.

His batting stance was different, but a lot of guys then had different kind of stances. One thing my dad always pointed out to me was that he would go to the plate and while he was digging in, he would wipe out the back line of the batters box. When he finally took his stance, his back foot (for him left foot) was mostly outside where the line would have been. That gave him just that extra split second to watch the pitch.

44 posted on 01/19/2013 7:50:14 PM PST by Ditto
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To: boop
Did anyone on FR see "The Man" play in person?

I saw my first major league game in 1950 the Cardinals vs the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Bottom of the 2nd inning Stan led off and hit the first pitch over the screen in right field. I would have been satisfied to leave right then for the 200 mile trip home.

I was there for Stan's last at bat, a single off Jim Maloney.

45 posted on 01/19/2013 7:55:28 PM PST by TYVets
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To: TYVets
Wow! So many memories.

Wish I'd seen "The Man" in action, or in person.

Envious of the FReepers who did.

46 posted on 01/19/2013 8:14:56 PM PST by boop ("You don't look so bad, here's another")
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To: boop
Did anyone on FR see "The Man" play in person?

Yep, saw him in his last game played at Connie Mack (Phillies), saw a lot of the great NL players like Mays, Koufax, Clemente and Aaron there, wasn't much to see on the Phillies side, I missed Ashburn when he played for the Phillies, I would have been 4 when he left Philadelphia.

47 posted on 01/19/2013 8:28:17 PM PST by this_ol_patriot
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To: bd476

Tears running down my cheeks ...


48 posted on 01/19/2013 8:31:58 PM PST by sushiman
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To: Ditto
His batting stance was different, but a lot of guys then had different kind of stances.

Remember Wes Covington, he would drop his back so far behind his back he looked like he was chopping wood, hehe, maybe he was.

49 posted on 01/19/2013 8:32:50 PM PST by this_ol_patriot
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To: bd476
Growing up in Brooklyn in the '50s, my friends and I went to Ebbetts Field as often as we could to see our beloved Dodgers. There were a few players from other teams that we respected...none more than Stan "The Man."

When I visited ST. Loo for the first time in the 1980s, the first thing I did was get to his statue outside the stadium.

RIP.

50 posted on 01/19/2013 8:33:39 PM PST by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
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