Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Unauthorized Unlocking of New Mobile Phones Set to Become Illegal in U.S.
MacRumors ^ | January 24, 2013 | Eric Slivka

Posted on 01/26/2013 5:38:55 AM PST by upchuck

As noted by Tech News Daily, a new federal policy in the United States is set to go into effect this Saturday that will make it illegal for certain mobile phone owners to unlock their devices for use on other carriers unless specifically authorized by their carriers. The policy applies to newly purchased devices beginning on Saturday, but not to legacy devices purchased prior to that date.

Unlocking devices allows users to take their phones to other carriers such as T-Mobile or to use SIM cards from international carriers while traveling abroad without needing to purchase expensive international roaming packages from their domestic carrier.

(Excerpt) Read more at macrumors.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption
KEYWORDS:
Hmmmm.... Comments at the source are interesting and overwhelmingly against this.
1 posted on 01/26/2013 5:39:03 AM PST by upchuck
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: upchuck

We may be at that point in history where enough laws have been passed so that everyone in this country is a criminal. This leaves open the possibility for selective law enforcement to target groups that are in disfavor.


2 posted on 01/26/2013 5:46:02 AM PST by BipolarBob (Happy Hunger Games! May the odds be ever in your favor.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

A little known fact that some scoundrel uncovered was that the Librarians of Congress, like federal judges, are nominated by the president, and appointed for life.

http://www.loc.gov/loc/legacy/librs.html

This means that any authority given them by congress is set in concrete unless congress specifically revokes it.


3 posted on 01/26/2013 5:46:54 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

“In October 2012, the Librarian of Congress, who determines exemptions to a strict anti-hacking law called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), decided that unlocking mobile phones would no longer be allowed.”

So a flunky federal fascist, all by himself, decides to write a law and make something illegal. Whatever happened to the idea that only Congress can write law? It’s time for states to start arresting federal fascist bureaucrats.


4 posted on 01/26/2013 5:50:15 AM PST by sergeantdave (The FBI has declared war on the Marine Corps)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sergeantdave

lol

what the hell is a librarian doing writing federal laws!!!


5 posted on 01/26/2013 5:54:13 AM PST by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

Funny how you can get Congress to pass these laws fairly quickly but could never get them to pass laws closing our Mexican border to illegals and drugs. This happened because lots of money was donated (campaigns) to the right critters in Congress


6 posted on 01/26/2013 5:58:26 AM PST by dennisw (The first principle is to find out who you are then you can achieve anything -- Buddhist monk)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TexasFreeper2009

What the hell is a community organizer doing trying to run the country?


7 posted on 01/26/2013 5:59:42 AM PST by Rannug ("God has given it to me, let him who touches it beware.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

Does the “Librarian of Congress” have a name? (And address, telephone number, etc.)


8 posted on 01/26/2013 6:00:44 AM PST by Cowboy Bob (Soon the "invisible hand" will press the economic "reset" button.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sergeantdave
This guy is no ordinary flunky -

James H. Billington is a native of Pennsylvania, but traveled elsewhere for educational purposes and professions. Billington was born June 1, 1929, in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. He attended public schools in the Philadelphia area and graduated from Lower Merion High School. Billington was the valedictorian of his high school class. He attended Princeton University and graduated as the class valedictorian in 1950. Billington attended Oxford University, and three years later he earned his doctorate.

Billington was also a member of the U.S. Army from 1953-1956 and rose to the rank of first lieutenant. After his service in the army, he was an instructor at Harvard University from 1957-1958 and then became the assistant professor of history from 1958-1961. From 1961 to 1964 he was an associate professor, and in 1964 he became the professor of history at Princeton University until 1973.

As the director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, he founded the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, along with seven other new programs. From 1973 to 1987 he was the director at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, which was the nation’s official memorial in Washington, DC, to the 28th president, Woodrow Wilson. On September 14, 1987, Billington was sworn in as the Librarian of Congress. The two main responsibilities of the Librarian of Congress are the overseeing of all library priorities and the management of the administrative operations of the office. The library holds almost 90 million books and papers and is the nation’s largest public library. Billington created The James Madison Council, which was the library’s first national private advisory group. The members of this group support the National Digital Library Program and other library programs. Since the library was established in 1800, he is the 13th person to hold the position.

Throughout his life, Billington has written many books. He is the author of Mikhailovsky and Russian Populism (1956), The Icon and the Axe: An Interpretive History of Russian Culture (1966), Fire in the Minds of Men (1980), Russia Transformed: Breakthrough to Hope, August 1991 (1992), and The Face of Russia (1998). The Icon and the Axe, Fire in the Minds of Men and The Face of Russia were translated and published in many different languages.

His first book, Mikhailovsky and Russian Populism, is a biography of Nikolai Mikhailovsky, a critic and populist movement leader. This book covered all aspects of the history of Russia. E.M. Arden reviewed this book and said that there are very few works that cover “intellectual and political movements and prominent individuals of the latter half of the 19th century in Russia [that combine] scholarship and lucidity in such a readable fashion as Dr. Billington’s.”

His second book, The Icon and the Axe: An Interpretive History of Russian Culture, showed that Billington was a dominant figure as a historian of Russia. The book covered more than a thousand years of history about Russian culture, politics, and Russian development. After The Icon and the Axe was released, Leonard Schapiro, a writer for the New Yorker, said Billington was, “a sensitive historian” and thought that this book was “a highly individual and personal reflection [of the Russian culture].”

Fire in the Minds of Men was not as popular with critics as the other histories were. Another writer for the New Yorker, Naomi Bliven, said, “Despite all his digging, he has uncovered very little that is of use to Americans in our present perplexities. We still need to learn...how people of different origins can live peacefully and equitably side by side.” Billington wrote and narrated the book The Face of Russia, which was shown on Public Broadcasting Stations on June 1998. The Face of Russia was the third part of the three-part television series that showed the history of the people of Russia through their culture. This was not the first time that Billington was associated with the television business. He had also been seen as a host, commentator, and a consultant for various other network television programs.

Throughout his life he has received 33 honorary degrees. One of the most prominent awards that he has received is the Woodrow Wilson Award from Princeton University in 1992. He has also received the UCLA Medal in 1999 and the Pushkin Medal of the International Association of the Teachers of Russian Language and Culture in 2000. He has received awards from several universities, including honorary doctorates from the University of Tibilisi in Georgia in 1999, the Moscow State University for the Humanities in 2001, and also from the University of Oxford in 2002.

Billington is very prominent in various countries across the world. He has become well known in Russia and other countries. He helped teach at schools and institutions in the USSR. Among these schools were the University of Leningrad and Moscow and also the Institute of History. Billington was chosen to be a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and has been both the Chevalier and the Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters of France. He is also the Commander of the National Order of the Southern Cross of Brazil and a Knight Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit by the Federal Republic in Germany. He has been awarded the Order of Merit of Italy, the Gwanghwa Medal from the Republic of Korea, and the Chingiz Aitmatov Gold Medal by the Kyrgyz Republic. Currently James Billington and his wife, Marjorie Anne Brennan, live in McLean, Virginia. He continues to improve the Library of Congress’s outreach by raising funds and by creating the National Book Festival as a way to facilitate learning through literature. In 2011, Billington was named Washingtonian of the Year.

9 posted on 01/26/2013 6:02:49 AM PST by Ken522
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: TexasFreeper2009

Silence! :-)


10 posted on 01/26/2013 6:02:53 AM PST by bigbob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
No.

If money was passed to accomplish this coup, we would have heard about it.

This is very simply the embeds in our government doing what they were born and determined to do .. kill the USA.

Years of determination and patience moved the chessmen ever so cleverly to back us into a checkmate position.


There is but one solution to their evil.

11 posted on 01/26/2013 6:07:17 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ken522

That’s quite the resume.

Side note: Same HS a Kobe Bryant


12 posted on 01/26/2013 6:14:51 AM PST by EEGator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

Sounds like a good idea, now since we cannot use our PURCHASED phone to go to another provider, Congress needs to pass a LAW immediately REQUIRING ALL PROVIDERS TO BUY BACK ANY PHONE PURCHASED, AT THE FULL PRICE THE CUSTOMER PAID, So they can buy another phone for a different provider. Watch this law scrapped overnight.


13 posted on 01/26/2013 6:23:11 AM PST by eyeamok
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

So get the phone unlocked overseas.


14 posted on 01/26/2013 6:23:13 AM PST by ASA Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

I got off this merry-go- round a year ago. I now use a by the minute phone. No games, no internet access,no apps and no $300.00 bill!!! $19.95 a month and I have 600 minutes built up!!!


15 posted on 01/26/2013 6:28:42 AM PST by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

I want to add, this is bull$h!t.

Two years ago, I traveled to Sweden and I had an older iPhone, 2G/Edge model and I jailbroke it and unlocked it. I got a T-Mobile SIM card but which worked and they have a very good roaming plan for overseas. However, when I got to Sweden, the phone saw the networks but wouldn’t connect. With my iPhone 3gs, it was locked to AT&T and didn’t used the phone except one time and for a 10 minute call, it was $15 !

I plan on doing another overseas trip and will get a local SIM card next time.

Of course what I did is now illegal. But at least Apple & AT&T now permit unlocking once the contract has been served.


16 posted on 01/26/2013 6:29:27 AM PST by CORedneck
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ontap

oops!!That $19.95 every three months!!!


17 posted on 01/26/2013 6:29:38 AM PST by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: ASA Vet

“So get the phone unlocked overseas.”

Isn’t this what Jailbreak is used for?


18 posted on 01/26/2013 6:29:38 AM PST by snoringbear (E.oGovernment is the Pimp,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: upchuck
Note to Mr. Billington: FU.

Impeach the kenyan or secession.


19 posted on 01/26/2013 6:30:17 AM PST by ex91B10 (We've tried the Soap Box,the Ballot Box and the Jury Box; ONE BOX LEFT!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: upchuck
Does this mean after the, usually, 24 month contract is fulfilled the phone becomes nothing more than a paperweight unless one continues with the same company?

Really, these little dictators are becoming out of control. If they keep it up they will eventually reap the whirlwind. And it's all so unnecessary. Just stay out of our personal business and things will run ever so much smoother.

20 posted on 01/26/2013 7:02:18 AM PST by pepperdog ( I still get a thrill up my leg when spell check doesn't recognize the name/word Obama!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ken522

He should be re-trained to operate a pick & shovel!


21 posted on 01/26/2013 7:08:11 AM PST by Minutemen ("It's a Religion of Peace")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: sergeantdave
So a flunky federal fascist, all by himself, decides to write a law and make something illegal. Whatever happened to the idea that only Congress can write law? It’s time for states to start arresting federal fascist bureaucrats.

Sorry, Sarge. It's called "Administrative Law" and it is UNFORTUNATELY entirely legal. Essentially Congress passed a law creating an administrative agency (the FCC in this case) and delegated law-making authority to the agency. This is what's responsible for the explosion of "laws" in the last 40 years. There's no putting this toothpaste back in the tube.

From Wikipedia...

Administrative law is the body of law that governs the activities of administrative agencies of government. Government agency action can include rulemaking, adjudication, or the enforcement of a specific regulatory agenda. Administrative law is considered a branch of public law. As a body of law, administrative law deals with the decision-making of administrative units of government (for example, tribunals, boards or commissions) that are part of a national regulatory scheme in such areas as police law, international trade, manufacturing, the environment, taxation, broadcasting, immigration and transport. Administrative law expanded greatly during the twentieth century, as legislative bodies worldwide created more government agencies to regulate the increasingly complex social, economic and political spheres of human interaction.

22 posted on 01/26/2013 7:13:13 AM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: EEGator
"Same HS as Kobe Bryant"

Ironic, (how times have changed)

23 posted on 01/26/2013 7:14:51 AM PST by Minutemen ("It's a Religion of Peace")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: ProtectOurFreedom

“It’s called “Administrative Law” and it is UNFORTUNATELY entirely legal. “

You know and I know it’s completely illegal and unconstitutional. There’s nothing in the constitution that allows congress to give its law-making power to unelected bureaucrats. The only reason it’s “legal” is because the fascist congress refuses to stop it and people put up with this crap.

This is equivalent to a president appointing a flunky prime minister and giving him all the powers of the presidency.

It will fall to the states and the people to end this illegal fascist law-breaking.


24 posted on 01/26/2013 7:34:46 AM PST by sergeantdave (The FBI has declared war on the Marine Corps)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

REally?!???

It’s my frickin property and I will do what I damned well please to it.

Including throwing the damn thing out of my car window because it wants to a bunch of things I don’t want it doing at the most inconvenient time.


25 posted on 01/26/2013 7:42:02 AM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sergeantdave

You are right, of course. Congresss should never have illegally delegated those powers in the first place in violation of the Constitution.

But that horse left the barn long ago.


26 posted on 01/26/2013 7:44:24 AM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
Funny how you can get Congress to pass these laws fairly quickly but could never get them to pass laws closing our Mexican border to illegals and drugs. This happened because lots of money was donated (campaigns) to the right critters in Congress

There's no question. We have the best government that global corporate and finance can buy.

And Congress had gladly ceded their power to the numerous agencies that constitute the fourth branch of government.
27 posted on 01/26/2013 7:49:21 AM PST by khelus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ken522
Killer resume. What jumped off the page at me was his extraordinary interest in stuff Russian.

Still can not understand how “The two main responsibilities of the Librarian of Congress are the overseeing of all library priorities and the management of the administrative operations of the office”, can be misconstrued into writing law. Is there any history of the office determining law previously?

Like a lot of other things while we suffer though our africanized gubmit, sounds like a gigantic over-reach that will evaporate now that sunlight is cast upon it.

28 posted on 01/26/2013 7:57:13 AM PST by X-spurt (Republic of Texas, Come and Take It!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: upchuck
You can also pay full-price for a phone, not the discounted price that comes with a two-year service contract, to receive the device unlocked from the get-go.

If you want phone 'freedom'...pay for it. Sheesh.

29 posted on 01/26/2013 8:08:18 AM PST by mac_truck ( Aide toi et dieu t aidera)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ProtectOurFreedom

“But that horse left the barn long ago.”

That’s for sure. If we had a constitutional government, both the president and judiciary would have told the congress it can’t do that.

This unconstitutional delegation of law-making power is one of the reasons we’re in a mess. Allowing unelected bureaucrats to write law is one of the primary features of a dictatorship. Both Hitler and Stalin encouraged it. Unelected bureaucrats can’t be removed by the people via the ballot box. That leaves few other choices.


30 posted on 01/26/2013 8:09:26 AM PST by sergeantdave (The FBI has declared war on the Marine Corps)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: BipolarBob

So now the authorities can get a warrant to search your house for suspicion that you have an unlocked phone?


31 posted on 01/26/2013 8:57:43 AM PST by philetus (Keep doing what you always do and you'll eventually get what you deserve)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

Hmm. Are conservatives for or against this?

The government exists in part to provide a neutral enforcer of contracts, to protect private ownership rights, and to maintain order.

When I decide I would like to own a phone, I shop around, and when I pick the one I want, I enter into a binding contract with the person (company) who manufactured the phone. I don’t have to buy the phone, but as part of the contract to buy the phone, I make an agreement not to do certain things with that phone.

So, is it wrong for the government to help the company by making me live up to the contractual arrangement?

Or is the concept of freedom and liberty such a guiding factor that, once I have the phone in my hand, my right to do whatever I want outweighs my obligation to live up to the terms of the contract I signed?

Remember, if I hadn’t signed that contract, the previous owner of the phone would not give me possession of the phone — it was their choice when they had ownership, and my choice whether to accept the arrangement.

As a matter of personal preference, I think it sucks that I can’t buy a phone and then use it on different services. But I also don’t expect that I can just hook my Verizon router into the comcast cable line and expect it to work.


32 posted on 01/26/2013 11:51:56 AM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ontap

what’s the name of phone?


33 posted on 01/26/2013 12:04:12 PM PST by ncpatriot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: ncpatriot

Tracfone from Wal-Mart!! The phones we got automatically double the minutes we purchase. We only use our phones when we are traveling so the only reason we have to $19.95 every three months is to keep the service active. We get 120 mins. for the 19.95 and it extends our service three months!!!


34 posted on 01/26/2013 6:56:47 PM PST by ontap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: CharlesWayneCT
So, is it wrong for the government to help the company by making me live up to the contractual arrangement?

Yes. Because this is a matter of civil law. What is being objected to is that increasingly, government is changing this to a criminal matter, which it has no business doing.

35 posted on 01/27/2013 6:36:05 AM PST by B Knotts (Just another Tenther)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: ontap

i have a tracfone too
it works great for me


36 posted on 01/27/2013 10:49:27 AM PST by ncpatriot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

Various law enforcement and intelligence agencies can remotely “jailbreak” your phone, and often do for surveillance and other purposes.

So how are they going to prove that didn’t occur to an unsuspecting customer upon prosecution?

“The CIA jailbroke my phone, it just so happened I realized I could use other SIM cards after that.”


37 posted on 01/27/2013 10:58:00 AM PST by RFEngineer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RFEngineer

they can’t.

this is just a scare rule.

the fact is that unlocking phones is sop. in some countries LOCKING phones is illegal.

when traveling abbroad it is smart to simply swap sim chips.

that is unless you have an out of date sprint or verizon phone using cdma tech. That is too primitive.


38 posted on 01/27/2013 11:17:20 AM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson