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Up to a third of Barnes & Noble stores to close, report says
LA Times ^ | 1/28/13 | Tiffany Hsu

Posted on 01/28/2013 11:51:11 AM PST by jimbo123

Barnes & Noble will shut up to a third of its brick-and-mortar bookstores over the next decade as reading habits change and digital publications evolve, according to a new report.

The chain will end up with 450 to 500 stores in 10 years, down from the 689 physical stores it has now, according to Mitchell Klipper, chief executive of Barnes & Noble's retail group.

That evens out to about 20 stores shuttered yearly over the period, Klipper said in an interview with the Wall Street Journal.

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 01/28/2013 11:51:15 AM PST by jimbo123
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To: jimbo123

That sucks

BTW am I only one does have Amazon kook or Barnes Noble digisal reader

I prefer old fashioned book


2 posted on 01/28/2013 11:54:18 AM PST by SevenofNine (We are Freepers, all your media bases belong to us ,resistance is futile)
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To: jimbo123

there not kneeded cause a lod of peopel can reed todey onywey.


3 posted on 01/28/2013 11:54:54 AM PST by GrandJediMasterYoda (Someday our schools we will teach the difference between "lose" and "loose")
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To: SevenofNine

I like books and I collect books. The problem with all brick and morter book chains is that they just don’t have the space to cater to every reader.

I get so frustrated at the lack of any male oriented books in the store I have to go to abe or amazon to order.


4 posted on 01/28/2013 11:58:29 AM PST by Perdogg (Mark Levin - It's called the Bill of Rights not Bill of Needs)
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To: Perdogg

That’s true Perdogg

I do have Amazon account myself I bought this one skin cream that I used through Via Amazon that only thing I bought from Amazon

Yeah you are so right


5 posted on 01/28/2013 11:59:44 AM PST by SevenofNine (We are Freepers, all your media bases belong to us ,resistance is futile)
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To: jimbo123

189 fewer places to buy overpriced coffee and argue with Liberals...


6 posted on 01/28/2013 12:04:16 PM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: SevenofNine

Im a big periodicals guy, specifically scale modeling and military/aviation. Since I like to look at what’s in them before deciding on buying (rather than subscribing) a physical store is the only way to go.

B&N, along with Borders, really expanded the selection of magazines and pushed the little guy news stands out of business. Since Borders died and removed competition I’ve noticed that B&N is cutting back on it’s magazines in both variety and inventory. They’ll probably end up killing the store near me. Hopefully the Books a Million and last local hobby shop will pick up the slack.


7 posted on 01/28/2013 12:04:21 PM PST by tanknetter
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To: jimbo123

Their basic problem is that they rent huge, expensive stores, then increase the prices of merchandise 40% or more of what it costs at Amazon. This is less about a changing market and more about bad business practices.

Their best bet would be to open their own publisher, then make exclusive deals with writers and editors, books only they sell in smaller stores that they own now. There are a huge number of writers out there who cannot now get published.

A big problem is that of having enough people to read manuscripts, and that should be part of the publishing agreement, that once an author is published, he has to electronically edit three other manuscripts by other authors before he can publish again. To avoid theft, when a writer submits a manuscript, it is kept on file for when next the editor publishes, to detect any plagiarism.


8 posted on 01/28/2013 12:17:55 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: SevenofNine

I don’t have a digital reader. I prefer books, too. Occasionally, I would like to have a reader to quickly find a quote, but that’s about it.


9 posted on 01/28/2013 12:18:51 PM PST by kosciusko51 (Enough of "Who is John Galt?" Who is Patrick Henry?)
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To: tanknetter
B&N, along with Borders, really expanded the selection of magazines and pushed the little guy news stands out of business. Since Borders died and removed competition I’ve noticed that B&N is cutting back on it’s magazines in both variety and inventory. They’ll probably end up killing the store near me. Hopefully the Books a Million and last local hobby shop will pick up the slack.

The real problem is one of socialism. Government-run, taxpayer-supported public libraries prevent private business from operating bookstores and newsstands at a profit. A subsidized industry has a built-in advantage over entrepreneurship every time.

Ben Franklin's original lending library was a private enterprise with volunteers exchanging reading matter. It wasn't a state-run outfit like the public libraries of today. Moreover, public libraries are hangouts for stinking third-world types and the homeless. It's not a realistic scenario but I'd really like to see the government get out of the book and periodical business, thus allowing free enterprise to flourish in that sector.

10 posted on 01/28/2013 12:19:56 PM PST by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: SevenofNine

Me too.


11 posted on 01/28/2013 12:20:17 PM PST by Jean2
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To: tanknetter

Interesting observation about the magazines. Years ago when the B&N opened in Carle Place they had a great mag selection, much better than the Borders in nearby Westbury. Lately the numbers of mags are the same but fewer titles in the History and Aviation and Transportation sections. Though they still have a large collection of Gun titles. I actually own two Nooks a new HD+ and a e print reader for the beach and pool. But I like a good book to hold as well. I do hope the Carle Place store stays around.


12 posted on 01/28/2013 12:24:46 PM PST by xkaydet65
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To: tanknetter

That’s what I was thinking. I really enjoy getting a cup of coffee and sitting down to read a couple magazines. I hope the one near me stays open.


13 posted on 01/28/2013 12:26:39 PM PST by stuartcr ("I upraded my moral compass to a GPS, to keep up with the times.")
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To: jimbo123

This is bad news. If the Barnes and Noble stores near me close, the nearest store where I can buy new books will be more than 30 miles away—and I live in a large metropolitan area.

I much prefer reading real books to reading screens, which hurt my eyes after a while.


14 posted on 01/28/2013 12:26:39 PM PST by Fiji Hill (Io Triumphe!)
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To: jimbo123

Overy optimistic on BN’s part. I call 100% of BN stores to close in 5 years. It’s a dead business model like record stores. Amazon has superior prices, quick delivery and access to out-of-print books (via marketplace) that you’d spend a lifetime searching for in brick and mortar locations.

I just bought a rare title that retails for $100 elsewhere for just $15 on Amazon marketplace.


15 posted on 01/28/2013 12:32:05 PM PST by sbMKE
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To: SevenofNine
I prefer old fashioned book

Me too. That's why I hate Barnes and Noble, who have turned into a giant coffee shop/DVD/stationary store.

Look in your local Yellow Pages for "Used Book Stores" and give them your patronage -- they need it and you'll find tons of great books to read.

16 posted on 01/28/2013 12:38:38 PM PST by Cincinatus (Omnia relinquit servare Rempublicam)
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To: jimbo123

I keep buying at my local B&N store to help keep it open but I know it’s a losing cause. When it opened it seemed too good to be true. And now it is.


17 posted on 01/28/2013 12:39:53 PM PST by firebrand
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To: SevenofNine

You’re not the only one. I like a book that I can prop on my lap or a pillow or wherever....not a piece of plastic I have to hold in my hand.


18 posted on 01/28/2013 12:39:53 PM PST by CatherineofAragon (Support Christian white males---the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
Their best bet would be to open their own publisher, then make exclusive deals with writers and editors, books only they sell in smaller stores that they own now. There are a huge number of writers out there who cannot now get published.

There ARE huge numbers of people out there who can't get published. As one of them, I assure you it's because most of them haven't written anything worth reading. Go check out the self published category on Amazon, read a few of the 99 cent books there. Shudder.

A big problem is that of having enough people to read manuscripts, and that should be part of the publishing agreement, that once an author is published, he has to electronically edit three other manuscripts by other authors before he can publish again. To avoid theft, when a writer submits a manuscript, it is kept on file for when next the editor publishes, to detect any plagiarism.

This is... well. The skillset to be a good writer is entirely different from the skillset to be a good editor. The best editors I've seen admit they can't write. The best writers don't have an editor's insight into how to spot a character issue or rework a dangling plotline.

And you've somewhat confused the slush pile and the editing process. The "slush pile" is the colloquial term for "giant mass of manuscripts hopeful writers send to a publisher". Theoretically, the publisher reads through them and pulls out what doesn't suck. Realistically these days, a writer submits to agents, not publishers, and the agents go directly to editors.

Regardless, most of what you'd get submitted would be utterly unreadable. Everyone thinks he can write a book. Most folks don't bother to do the work that's actually required.

19 posted on 01/28/2013 12:43:13 PM PST by JenB
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To: jimbo123

Meh, no tears here...
Though not the place’s fault, I happened to be in a B&N a few weeks before the 2008 election in Hampton, VA and was there long enough to witness the “fueling” with coffee and pastries of a group of Acorn workers, proudly displaying their credentials for all to see, getting ready to hit the streets.
Glared at them as they all made their way out the door...


20 posted on 01/28/2013 12:43:20 PM PST by matginzac
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To: CatherineofAragon

I don’t like my reading to be dependent on something that requires a power supply.


21 posted on 01/28/2013 12:51:17 PM PST by stuartcr ("I upraded my moral compass to a GPS, to keep up with the times.")
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To: re_nortex
The real problem is one of socialism. Government-run, taxpayer-supported public libraries prevent private business from operating bookstores and newsstands at a profit. A subsidized industry has a built-in advantage over entrepreneurship every time.

I hope you're kidding. I don't think B&N (and Border's before it, and every other bookstore and bookstore chain) is having trouble competing with the public library. Public libraries have existed throughout the entirety of B&N's existence, and B&N was flourishing until Amazon (and the Kindle) came along and was able to undercut B&N on price. Blaming B&N's troubles on the public library is absurd.

22 posted on 01/28/2013 12:53:24 PM PST by Conscience of a Conservative
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To: jimbo123

It’s a commie store so who cares? Everytime I go into ours the Beck books are behind the Lib books. The people that work there are all left wing nut jobs. Let ‘em close.


23 posted on 01/28/2013 12:54:46 PM PST by albie
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To: jimbo123

I remember from 2 or 3 years back that Barnes and Noble was investing in “ON-Demand” book printing. They were going to maintain a massive digital library of books and whenever someone wanted a hard copy, they would just use their print and bind machine to make a single copy. A typical 300 or 400 page book would take about 5 minutes to be printed and bound and would sell for about $15.

What happened to this technology?
It seemed great.


24 posted on 01/28/2013 1:02:20 PM PST by BuffaloJack (Children, pets, and slaves get taken care of. Free Men take care of themselves.)
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To: kosciusko51
I don’t have a digital reader. I prefer books, too. I don’t have a digital reader. I prefer books, too.

I used to think that as well, but since I got the Kindle app on my smart phone I'm finding I prefer reading books on my phone. I read a lot and it's a lot easier to carry around a smart phone than a book. Also allows me to easily read a bit when I have short breaks in my working day.

25 posted on 01/28/2013 1:03:40 PM PST by 6ppc (It's torch and pitchfork time)
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To: SevenofNine

“I prefer old fashioned book”

I agree. I’ve got a kindle. I am pretty happy with it - it is great for travel, and if I can find the kindle it is easy to find the books. Also, there is so much great stuff in the public domain now, so free downloads.

That said, there is nothing like an honest, for real old book - hard cover with heavy stock paper. And I will NEVER lose the rush of entering a used book store and getting that wonderful musk of old paper, glue and leather.

But I do enjoy my kindle. It augments books, but does not replace them.


26 posted on 01/28/2013 1:05:05 PM PST by Psalm 144 (Capitol to the districts: "May the odds be ever in your favor.")
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To: jimbo123

Barnes and Noble are going to close a third of their stores? I hope the other 50% will be OK.


27 posted on 01/28/2013 1:06:28 PM PST by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: jimbo123
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Aw, I guess Obamugabe will have to find another place to do a book signing.

28 posted on 01/28/2013 1:06:32 PM PST by SoFloFreeper
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To: jimbo123
I wanted to give John Mackey's (the vegetarian libertarian CEO of Whole Foods) new book to my daughter (vegetarian, but gainfully employed and paying taxes, so there is hope!) I stopped by B&N this weekend so I would be sure to have it when I saw her. B&N lists the book for $17.30 on their website. Fortunately, I asked the price before I handed over my credit card -- they were asking $27, full price for the book, in the store!

$9.70 plus tax plus my gasoline plus my time so I can wait in line to have a fat, surly, underemployed Obama voting lib put it in a bag for me?

I walked out, and ordered the book from Amazon.

I'm amazed that they only expect one third of the brick and mortar stores to close.

29 posted on 01/28/2013 1:18:41 PM PST by Sooth2222 ("Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of congress. But I repeat myself." M.Twain)
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To: kosciusko51

I prefer books too. I have an Ipad but I don’t use it for books. I did try one once, but it just doesn’t work for me. By the way, if you have friends that are readers, I don’t think you can trade ebooks. That really bothers me because we do trade books. Maybe some can but I haven’t found a way to do it. I do try to buy most of my books at the bookstore because I want to support them. A bookstore is a great community.


30 posted on 01/28/2013 1:19:42 PM PST by pjpblush
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To: jimbo123
I buy most of my technical books as e-books in PDF or epub formats. My Android cell phone, Galaxy Tab 10.1 and Nexus 10 can share that library. I can have all my books with me at all times. My physical book case at my San Diego rental room is 7 feet tall with 6 shelves that are 4 feet wide. Totally full. I'm out of space. I have 10 more book cases similarly filled in the library at my home in Idaho. I love my physical books, but they really take some space.
31 posted on 01/28/2013 1:31:19 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: JenB

Perhaps I should have said the published author would work as a screen instead of an editor, to at least cull the bulk of the crapola.

I used to enjoy the ‘writings from the slush pile’ that was published in the old National Lampoon magazine. Though he did it anonymously, I recognized the collection as coming from Ben Bova, when he was editing Analog.


32 posted on 01/28/2013 1:39:57 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Yes, crowdsourcing the slush pile could work (my understanding is most books can be rejected based on their first page). That said, I’m not sure it would do anything to actually help B&N. Amazon has various ways of trying to milk the “want to be author” crowd for their own benefit, like Amazon’s Kindle Digital program. Getting your book on the store shelf is great and would be an attractor over using Amazon. But I’m not really sure there’s that many really great books that aren’t getting attention from publishers. Publishing a book has a lot of costs (the paper and ink are among the least of them) and B&N doesn’t really have any of the infrastructure in place to do so.


33 posted on 01/28/2013 2:05:36 PM PST by JenB
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To: SevenofNine

Type slower, I can’t understand you.


34 posted on 01/28/2013 2:09:07 PM PST by STD ( People say 'It's as plain as the nose on your face' but none of us can see theirs!)
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To: SevenofNine

Type slower, I can’t understand you.


35 posted on 01/28/2013 2:09:28 PM PST by STD ( People say 'It's as plain as the nose on your face' but none of us can see theirs!)
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To: SevenofNine

Type slower, I can’t understand you.


36 posted on 01/28/2013 2:09:37 PM PST by STD ( People say 'It's as plain as the nose on your face' but none of us can see theirs!)
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To: SevenofNine

Type slower, I can’t understand you.


37 posted on 01/28/2013 2:09:37 PM PST by STD ( People say 'It's as plain as the nose on your face' but none of us can see theirs!)
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To: SevenofNine

Type slower, I can’t understand you.


38 posted on 01/28/2013 2:09:37 PM PST by STD ( People say 'It's as plain as the nose on your face' but none of us can see theirs!)
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To: jimbo123

A lot of unemployed liberals. Sniff.


39 posted on 01/28/2013 2:11:54 PM PST by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: jimbo123

I can see people trying to absorb the Bible on an electronic reader Kindle or otherwise. It won’t happen, not in depth. Plus you cannot annotate pages. Reading words on paper is much better than any electronic screen. Too bad the younger generations will not know the difference


40 posted on 01/28/2013 2:15:55 PM PST by dennisw (The first principle is to find out who you are then you can achieve anything -- Buddhist monk)
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To: kosciusko51; SevenofNine
I like traditional books as well, but as much as anything, I object to the price of eBooks. They are anywhere from $10 to $15, almost as much as a book printed on paper, and there are no paper costs, shipping costs, or anything else that drive that pricing.

Then I think about the whole Digital Rights Management thing, and realize that I might lose my right to the book, as opposed to having physical possession of a book that cannot be taken from me for any reason. If they were 5 bucks, I might consider it.

41 posted on 01/28/2013 2:56:15 PM PST by Hardastarboard (The Liberal ruling class hates me. The feeling is mutual.)
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To: stuartcr
"I don’t like my reading to be dependent on something that requires a power supply."

Yep, that's a point, too.

42 posted on 01/28/2013 3:26:55 PM PST by CatherineofAragon (Support Christian white males---the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization)
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To: jimbo123

They will keep the ones open next to the record shops.


43 posted on 01/28/2013 3:32:24 PM PST by Mike Darancette (Soylent Green is Boomers)
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