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To: Kaslin

I’m reminded of an Armand Hammer (Leftist billionaire apologist for the USSR) produced film BACKSTAGE AT THE KIROV about the famous ballet theatre and school in Leningrad. It showed ballerinas training, performing, backstage chatting, and walking the beautiful streets of Leningrad. But it did not show their apartments.

Communist party officials in that era had no toilet paper in their homes so the used paper from documents etc. There were no feminine hygiene products not even for dentists and doctors. So they used, washed, and reused rags or cloth.

And the stores had the ole three line system. Line up to select what you want and then line up to pay for what you want and then line up to receive what you paid for. Many would get in a line without knowing what the line is for assuming that it was something in stock that was in demand. Food stores were always out of many basics.


7 posted on 02/13/2013 10:02:00 AM PST by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: Monterrosa-24

Your post reminds me of a story I read years ago of an American federal employee who was assigned by her boss to pick up a visiting Soviet woman for a meeting. When they left the airport, the Soviet remarked that the USSR had large airports, too. When driving through the city, she commented that Moscow was a much larger city.

The American remembered that she had to stop and get a few items for dinner, so she informed her guest that she needed to stop in at the supermarket, and she was welcome to come in and get something if she wished.

The Soviet visitor entered the store, gasped at the sight of such super-abundance, and burst into tears.


10 posted on 02/13/2013 11:12:01 AM PST by txrefugee
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