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Struggling Caribbean islands selling citizenship
AP via news.yahoo.com ^ | Tue Feb 12, 2013 | David Mcfadden

Posted on 02/13/2013 3:41:14 PM PST by posterchild

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) -- Hadi Mezawi has never set foot on the Caribbean island of Dominica, has never seen its rainforests or black-sand beaches. But he's one of its newest citizens.

Without leaving his home in the United Arab Emirates, the Palestinian man recently received a brand new Dominican passport after sending a roughly $100,000 contribution to the tropical nation half a world away.

"At the start I was a little worried that it might be a fraud, but the process turned out to be quite smooth and simple. Now, I am a Dominican," said Mezawi, who like many Palestinians had not been recognized as a citizen of any country. That passport will help with travel for his job with a Brazilian food processing company, he said by telephone from Dubai.

Turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa has led to a surge of interest in programs that let investors buy citizenship or residence in countries around the world in return for a healthy contribution or investment. Most are seeking a second passport for hassle-free travel or a ready escape hatch in case things get worse at home.

Nowhere is it easier or faster than in the minuscule Eastern Caribbean nations of Dominica and St. Kitts & Nevis.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: citizenship; dominica; expats; nevis; saintkitts

1 posted on 02/13/2013 3:41:18 PM PST by posterchild
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To: posterchild

I might do that if they would deal with the IRS over my exit taxes.


2 posted on 02/13/2013 3:43:03 PM PST by elkfersupper ( Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: elkfersupper

Once this gets out....I’d expect 10k Americans to apply over the next year.


3 posted on 02/13/2013 3:44:48 PM PST by pepsionice
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To: posterchild
Hmmmm ... Dominicans aren't looked on as terrorists, so alqueerda pays for a couple of hundred "Dominicans" and the "Dominicans" get a free-er entrance into the US.

Hmmmm (again) ... BJ and GHWB went to Haiti ... wellll ... maybe not ....

just sayin'

4 posted on 02/13/2013 3:46:45 PM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: pepsionice

If we could get $100K from each illegal.... hhhmmm


5 posted on 02/13/2013 3:57:45 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: posterchild

Over the next decade, you’ll see the “best and brightest” of the medical field leave the US and set up boutique clinics somewhere in the Caribbean for wealthy Americans to utilize outside of BaraqqiCare. They will also create some good jobs for capable grunts interested in moving beyond tyranny.


6 posted on 02/13/2013 4:04:45 PM PST by nascarnation (Baraq's economic policy: trickle up poverty)
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To: posterchild

$100,000? I’d like to know where that money came from, given that he works in “food processing”.


7 posted on 02/13/2013 4:09:07 PM PST by Amberdawn
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To: posterchild

So, what’s the cheapest country which does this, that is actually a decent place to live, being stable both politically and economically, with a bare minimum of grabby bureaucracy?

Is there such a place? Several Central American countries are pleasant and cheap, with Belize being very doable on a $2,000.00 a month SS check, but stability is a relatively recent thing for the region, so I’d tend to wonder about longterm prospects. No idea regarding citizenship.


8 posted on 02/13/2013 4:09:40 PM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: posterchild

A great solution for the people in the world who are stateless.


9 posted on 02/13/2013 4:10:39 PM PST by OKRA2012
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To: RegulatorCountry

I personally know 2 families who have moved to Costa Rica. I think it’s too soon for them to know if it will be a good decision in the long run, but for now, they just want to get away from what they see will be the biggest collapse of a nation/economy in human history.


10 posted on 02/13/2013 4:11:43 PM PST by ChocChipCookie
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To: Amberdawn

He’s from the Emirates.
#6 in the world in per capita income.


11 posted on 02/13/2013 4:15:50 PM PST by nascarnation (Baraq's economic policy: trickle up poverty)
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To: ChocChipCookie

We have a FReeper on the FR state forum for NC who has been in Colombia for about that length of time, very nice according to him, but they’re in one of the smaller inland cities. Still pockets of FARC out in the countryside. Currency, peso, has appreciated a fair amount since he’s been there. Cost of living is low unless you’re converting from dollars right now.


12 posted on 02/13/2013 4:18:27 PM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: Amberdawn

$100,000 in order to acquire citizenship when you currently have no citizenship is a great price.

And, as long as he broke no US laws, it is none of our business how he came up with the 100k.


13 posted on 02/13/2013 4:20:14 PM PST by OKRA2012
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To: Amberdawn

No big mystery—Dubai has no taxes and high expat manager salaries.


14 posted on 02/13/2013 4:20:55 PM PST by dinodino
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To: OKRA2012

I assume the UAE could be a problematic location if/when bigtime SHTF in the mideast. This guy is likely buying himself a nice insurance policy.


15 posted on 02/13/2013 4:24:08 PM PST by nascarnation (Baraq's economic policy: trickle up poverty)
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To: posterchild

So let me get this straight... I send them $100,000, they will send me a “passport”?? That’s almost as awesome a deal as the fact that someone in Nigeria is sending me $500,000, all for sending him $150,000. Once I get that money wired to my account, I’m going to be all over this!!!


16 posted on 02/13/2013 4:28:40 PM PST by ObozoMustGo2012
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To: posterchild
Mezawi, who like many Palestinians had not been recognized as a citizen of any country.

That's because Arab countries don't want them.

17 posted on 02/13/2013 4:29:18 PM PST by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: nascarnation

Meanwhile, our own hospitals here in the US will be increasingly staffed by 3rd world doctors, a process that has been underway for some time already, and will only get worse.


18 posted on 02/13/2013 4:32:05 PM PST by supremedoctrine ("What thou lovest well , remains. The rest is dross"---Ezra pound)
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To: nascarnation

His problem was that he could never leave the UAE for work, vacation or anything.

Now, he may never in his life enter the DR but he can go to any country he wants.


19 posted on 02/13/2013 4:32:56 PM PST by OKRA2012
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To: posterchild

Many countries have “Immigrant Investor” policies where you don’t have to actually make any donations - just invest in a business or sometimes just put the dough in a bank account and get citizenship either immediately or can apply in a few years.

Canada had, and probably still does, have one. That is why Vancouver (also known now as Hongcouver) has 15% Chinese population - most from Hong Kong pre-return to Chinese provincial status.

Thailand also has similar path to citizenship but I think they want more like $500K investment (bank deposit) - not sure about that though.


20 posted on 02/13/2013 4:35:18 PM PST by expat1000
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To: posterchild

“At the start I was a little worried that it might be a fraud, but the process turned out to be quite smooth and simple. Now, I am a Dominican,” said Mezawi O.P.


21 posted on 02/13/2013 4:41:22 PM PST by Oztrich Boy (I think, therefore I am what I yam, and that's all I yam - "Popeye" Descartes)
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To: Amberdawn
he works in “food processing”.

My guess the bakery line. Works with the "dough" making yellowcake.

22 posted on 02/13/2013 4:46:04 PM PST by C210N (When people fear government there is tyranny; when government fears people there is liberty)
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To: posterchild

Forget the Caribbean, I want to buy membership in an Indian tribe.


23 posted on 02/13/2013 4:46:49 PM PST by Ciexyz
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To: elkfersupper

Just bolt like an East German. The Democrats aren’t yet having Americans gunned down as they flee, although if the flow swells enough I imagine they’ll get serious about “border security” PDQ.


24 posted on 02/13/2013 4:47:56 PM PST by Trod Upon (Civilian disarmament is the precursor to democide.)
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To: ObozoMustGo2012

Since this is done by the governments of Doominica and St Kitts, it’s legal. Perfectly legal. The passports are worth well over $100K to those ‘citizens.’ And, of course, they can now travel freely into the US and in the case of St Kitts, the EU.


25 posted on 02/13/2013 4:48:25 PM PST by EDINVA
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To: posterchild

Having dual citizenship makes a lot of sense today, especially if you like to travel internationally. With an American passport, you are a target. With another passport you can travel without a bullseye on your back.

There are several countries that will give you citizenship simply because your grandparents were citizens. Ireland and Poland are off the top of my head. My wife and I are looking into that.

The main benefit to dual citizenship is more privacy in your personal affairs. And you don’t have to have a large estate for this to make sense. Just seek professional help in this matter or you could be subject to scams and what not.


26 posted on 02/13/2013 5:20:06 PM PST by bushbuddy
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To: bushbuddy

“The main benefit to dual citizenship is more privacy in your personal affairs. And you don’t have to have a large estate for this to make sense. Just seek professional help in this matter or you could be subject to scams and what not.”

To continue...

If you have one citizenship and passport, you are owned lock, stock and barrel. No escape plan. No guaranteed right of movement. No guaranteed passport. No right of residency outside your own country, should you want to do so. You are just a milk cow belonging to your government. When things get bad, you can quickly become a beef cow.

Two citizenships with two travel documents (passports) opens up a new world.

Now, personally I don’t know anything about all this. Any information, passports, citizenships, etc., were lost in a tragic boating accident last year. I suppose there’s an office to report this to, but I don’t know which one...


27 posted on 02/13/2013 5:27:58 PM PST by aMorePerfectUnion (Gone rogue, gone Galt, gone international, gone independent. Gone.)
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To: posterchild; a fool in paradise; Slings and Arrows

Experience shows that having a dual citizenship could pave one’s road to the White House.


28 posted on 02/13/2013 5:30:26 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: dinodino

I was being a bit facetious in that all we hear is the ‘poor Palestinians’...


29 posted on 02/13/2013 5:48:01 PM PST by Amberdawn
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To: OKRA2012

I can only hope you didn’t break a sweat to write what I already know.


30 posted on 02/13/2013 5:50:15 PM PST by Amberdawn
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To: posterchild

The problem with US Citizens and anyone with a US Green Card is that they are captives of the US tax and financial surveillance system and its web of tax treaties. With few places in the world for a US Person to hold assets that can be done without the US government being able to observe and even take, the only way out is to get a passport from another country and eventually to remove all assets from US reach.

It is a sad day when US citizens are no longer free, but the sad truth is that the US is no longer free in many respects.


31 posted on 02/13/2013 6:31:56 PM PST by theBuckwheat
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To: ObozoMustGo2012

The net cost is much lower because part of the deal in Dominica is a required investment in some approved asset like real estate.


32 posted on 02/13/2013 6:34:26 PM PST by theBuckwheat
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To: posterchild

$100,000 is a bit out of my price range. However, I was looking into buying property overseas a few years ago, and I found out something interesting. In the Philippines, land is cheap, but non-citizens can’t technically own property. They usually have to have natives own in it their names, or marry a citizen and put it in her name. However, you can apply for a special type of visa, called a Retirement & Investment visa, which is like a permanent resident visa that allows you to own property and work or run a business there without becoming a citizen.

All you seem to need to get that visa is to show that you have liquid assets of something like $30,000 that you are willing to invest in the country. So, you can get some of the benefits of buying a citizenship without having to actually give all that money to some government.


33 posted on 02/13/2013 6:35:09 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: nascarnation

“somewhere in the Caribbean”

I predict that once the Castros die in the next decade or so, Cuba will become a new offshore haven for stuff like that. It’s got the best location for it, and once Americans are free to invest there again, there will be a gold rush I think.


34 posted on 02/13/2013 6:38:15 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

That would be quite a reversal of govts, and you may well be right.


35 posted on 02/13/2013 6:42:14 PM PST by nascarnation (Baraq's economic policy: trickle up poverty)
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To: Ciexyz

I doubt you’d be able to afford it, even if you could find a tribe willing to sell one. Better off just trying to woo an Indian and get them to marry ya :)


36 posted on 02/13/2013 6:43:18 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: OKRA2012

Dominica!= Dominican Republic. But otherwise, spot on.


37 posted on 02/13/2013 7:22:40 PM PST by JCBreckenridge (Texas is a state of mind - Steinbeck)
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Comment #38 Removed by Moderator

To: Ciexyz

That would help their financial status more than dis-enrolling members to increase the payments to each member.
And as a member of a Native American tribe, you get better legal protection if CPS wants to take your kid, access to other court systems and protection from some federal laws.


39 posted on 02/16/2013 6:22:34 PM PST by tbw2
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