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In a modern world, meteorite’s impact is instantly global
Washington Post ^ | February 16, 2013 | Steve Hendrix

Posted on 02/16/2013 4:40:16 PM PST by Vince Ferrer

That celestial rock had been zooming along at 40,000 mph for thousands of years when it exploded over Russia on Friday — and that’s when it really picked up speed.

The first big meteorite of the media age rocketed through the consciousness of its target planet at the speed of Twitter. A rare event in a remote place went viral, thanks to the ubiquitous dashboard cameras of bad Russian drivers. And it instantly grabbed the attention of an electronic age that thought it was beyond being stunned by a bolt from space.

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtonpost.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
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1 posted on 02/16/2013 4:40:23 PM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: Vince Ferrer

Just be glad it wasn’t a Tunguska event over a populated area. Yesterday’s meteor was a relatively small one.

Its pretty damn stupid that with our technology we decided that navel gazing was the way to go 40 years ago.


2 posted on 02/16/2013 4:45:35 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Vince Ferrer

Considering that something larger and on a more direct
course could play havoc with mankind, I’d say it was
time we paid more attention, also that it was a SURPRISE!


3 posted on 02/16/2013 4:45:43 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: cripplecreek
Just be glad it wasn’t a Tunguska event over a populated area. Yesterday’s meteor was a relatively small one. Its pretty damn stupid that with our technology we decided that navel gazing was the way to go 40 years ago.

Actually the meteor exploded with about 30 times the force of the bombs used on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It was not "relatively small". The fact is it exploded at 15+ miles above the earth which kept the damage at a minimum, had it come down lower before exploding the area that it hit would have been flattened. It was not a REMOTE area, it had upward of 1,000,000 people living there and over 1,000 were injured, minor injuries for the most part but still there would have been hundreds of thousands of people dead had it went off closer to the ground.

4 posted on 02/16/2013 4:50:42 PM PST by calex59
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To: tet68

It does seem like a pretty clear shot across the bow doesn’t it. God gave us a large moon that protects us from many of these so the least we can do is pick up the slack on our end.

In my opinion the one that exploded over Russia yesterday is probably at the low limit of what we would need to deal with.

Personally I’m hoping this will spur even greater investment with those who seek to mine asteroids. After all, they would be the ones likely to get the contract to eliminate threats.


5 posted on 02/16/2013 4:54:49 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: calex59
It was not "relatively small"

Actually it was.

Find out about the huge meteor that exploded over Russia in this SPACE.com Infographic.
Source SPACE.com: All about our solar system, outer space and exploration
6 posted on 02/16/2013 4:58:10 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Vince Ferrer
"...thanks to the ubiquitous dashboard cameras of bad Russian drivers."

Go to YouTube and search on 'bad Russian drivers'. You won't believe some of the crazy wrecks you'll see.

7 posted on 02/16/2013 5:09:07 PM PST by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: cripplecreek

Shoemaker-Levy 9 would have been an extinction level event if it hit here. Fortunately, those are less likely to hit Earth than Jupiter, as Jupiter’s size and gravity is what is capturing the comets. Jupiter creates its own problems, where the Earth does not.


8 posted on 02/16/2013 5:10:32 PM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: Vince Ferrer

I can’t help wondering if there might have been a time during the last 60 years when this kind of event might have set of an accidental war. Obviously it’s less likely these days.


9 posted on 02/16/2013 5:15:50 PM PST by clearcarbon
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To: Windflier
Russian drivers have nothing on Russian mechanics!
10 posted on 02/16/2013 5:17:55 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: Vince Ferrer

Nothing wrong with this.


11 posted on 02/16/2013 5:24:12 PM PST by Thud
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To: Vince Ferrer

Here are a couple of impact simulators to play with.

http://www.purdue.edu/impactearth

http://simulator.down2earth.eu/


12 posted on 02/16/2013 5:38:22 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

Actually, it wasn’t. Small compared to a 100 kiloton bomb but not small compared to a modern nuke of about 50 KT. If it had been only about 5 miles about the earth when it went off you could send notes to the people of that area telling them that it could have been worse, they could have been killed by a bigger meteor.


13 posted on 02/16/2013 5:57:57 PM PST by calex59
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To: 1rudeboy
Russian drivers have nothing on Russian mechanics!

Dayum! How do you say asinine cruelty in Russian?

14 posted on 02/16/2013 5:58:27 PM PST by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: Windflier
How do you say asinine cruelty in Russian?

веселье

15 posted on 02/16/2013 6:22:18 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: Windflier

Vodka, though in this case all you see is beer. I’m sure some was involved.


16 posted on 02/16/2013 6:35:54 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: calex59
If it had been only about 5 miles about the earth when it went off ...

In what sense did it "go off"? The idea of an explosion is very misleading, IMHO. It did flare up, but in the videos you can see shadows cast by the flare moving rapidly over the course of several seconds, so evidently the "explosion" was traveling at great speed through the air. But this is contradictory to the idea of an explosion, which is a localized release of energy that propagates a spherical shockwave.

I would expect to see a linear track of the concussive damage due to a conical shockwave, or sonic boom, caused by the hypersonic passage of the object through the air.

17 posted on 02/16/2013 6:48:05 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: clearcarbon

Less Likely? Last I heard the Russian military is blaming this on a new US weapon.


18 posted on 02/16/2013 7:12:35 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: dr_lew
... evidently the "explosion" was traveling at great speed through the air.

They're saying something like 40,000 MPH. What is that, Mach 6? No way is that concussion going to be spherical. I've seen the videos, and if that thing was 15 miles high it had to have been moving very fast indeed.

19 posted on 02/16/2013 7:20:35 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: Cyber Liberty
"Last I heard the Russian military is blaming this on a new US weapon."

They forget who's in charge. If this had occurred to Chicago during the obama third term he would have surrendered by now.
20 posted on 02/16/2013 7:38:23 PM PST by clearcarbon
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To: clearcarbon

Russian Generals have not been known for their world-political savvy, so I cut them some slack on this. But it is indicative of their operating paradigm. They still blame us for everything. Not much different than your average North Korean, actually.


21 posted on 02/16/2013 7:43:41 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: dr_lew; Windflier
OK, hint. Copy and paste веселье into Google translate, say what you will about Google. Of course, that's how I got it, in reverse.
22 posted on 02/16/2013 7:51:51 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: Cyber Liberty

The reports I saw said it was a Russian POLITICIAN making this accusation, so what the heck, it could have been an American politician, know what I mean?


23 posted on 02/16/2013 7:57:46 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: dr_lew

It could have been the Kenyan politician in the White Hut, for that matter. He blames everything on others as well.


24 posted on 02/16/2013 8:00:33 PM PST by Cyber Liberty (Obama considers the Third World morally superior to the United States.)
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To: dr_lew
In what sense did it "go off"? The idea of an explosion is very misleading, IMHO. It did flare up, but in the videos you can see shadows cast by the flare moving rapidly over the course of several seconds, so evidently the "explosion" was traveling at great speed through the air. But this is contradictory to the idea of an explosion, which is a localized release of energy that propagates a spherical shockwave.
I would expect to see a linear track of the concussive damage due to a conical shockwave, or sonic boom, caused by the hypersonic passage of the object through the air.

I was kind of wondering whether it was a sonic boom or an explosion. After watching various videos the event it seems evident that it was an explosion. There was one big boom followed by several smaller pops. The contrail showed a huge flare and then peters out. The huge flare was where it exploded...one person said that the explosion basically happens (and I'm greatly paraphrasing here) because the energy from the speed of the object once it hits the atmosphere is being released basically all at once. It has to go somewhere so the result is an explosion. Very fascinating though no matter what.

25 posted on 02/16/2013 8:02:27 PM PST by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC

Yeah, it could “explode” if it were to disintegrate and all the pieces were to come to a stop in a short distance. This seems to be the concept you are describing. Of course the same thing happens in a big way if it hits the ground. However, as I noted, the brilliant flare very clearly travelled through the air for several seconds before it faded, so this was not an “explosion” in the sense usually understood, as of an artillery shell.

OTOH, the sudden brilliance of the flare would indicate an increase in deceleration of the object, or the aggregate of its components, so that we might expect its shock wave to intensify as well, so maybe it’s not really an either/or proposition.


26 posted on 02/16/2013 8:19:48 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: cripplecreek

It intrigues me that we knew the exact path of the 150’ meteor (2012 DA14), but never knew a thing about the 55’ meteor.


27 posted on 02/16/2013 8:35:06 PM PST by Teacher317 ('Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss.)
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To: Teacher317
It intrigues me that we knew the exact path of the 150’ meteor (2012 DA14), but never knew a thing about the 55’ meteor.

That 55' figure was a shock to me. I saw 10 tons, and thought that made sense. Well a cubic meter of water weighs a ton, and rock is nominally 5 times that, so we're talking 1-2 meters for a 10 ton job. That's big, of course. They say most of the meteors you see are pinheads. I can't believe that thing was 15 meters in diameter. I think everybody is going crazy. That's what I think.

28 posted on 02/16/2013 9:28:09 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: dr_lew

Dr Lew — most meteors are not rock but in fact are solid metal.

What I find interesting is that we had THREE meteor-related events, all in the same day!

There was the near-miss asteroid, passing only 17,000 miles away; the Russian meteor explosion; and the fireball that skimmed the atmosphere over San Fran.

Most years you might see one such event. But three in one day? Too weird!


29 posted on 02/17/2013 7:21:14 AM PST by DNME (Without the Constitution, there is no legitimate U.S. government. Period.)
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To: DNME
As per wikipedia article on Chondrites ( i.e. stony as opposed to iron meteorites ) :

Most meteorites that are recovered on Earth are chondrites: 86.2% of witnessed falls are chondrites, as are the overwhelming majority of meteorites that are found.

30 posted on 02/17/2013 5:56:06 PM PST by dr_lew
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To: dr_lew

My apologies, Dr. Lew.

My college astronomy class was a VERY long time ago (back when meteors were still being made) and I was led to believe metallic asteroids outnumbered the “chondrites” you cited. My bad.


31 posted on 02/17/2013 8:19:16 PM PST by DNME (Without the Constitution, there is no legitimate U.S. government. Period.)
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