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Marissa Mayer, Who Just Banned Working From Home, Paid To Have A Nursery Built At Her Office
Business Insider ^ | Feb. 25, 2013 | Nicholas Carlson

Posted on 02/26/2013 10:31:10 AM PST by jimbo123

Last Friday, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer banned employees from working remotely.

Human resources boss Jackie Reses sent out a memo telling all remote employees that, by June, they needed to be working in Yahoo offices.

This upset many employees – mothers in particular.

-snip-

Mayer – who had a baby last fall – is a working mother, but she's able to bring her kid to work.

That's because when Mayer had her son last fall, she paid to have a nursery built in her office.

(Excerpt) Read more at businessinsider.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: marissamayer; yahoo
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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Is An Obama Bundler She's raised nearly $400,000 since 2007.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/zekejmiller/yahoo-ceo-marissa-mayer-is-an-obama-bundler

1 posted on 02/26/2013 10:31:17 AM PST by jimbo123
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To: jimbo123

That kind of “leadership” is why Yahoo is tanking.

Yahoo is garbage, and Ms. Mayer is right at home in that environment.


2 posted on 02/26/2013 10:36:03 AM PST by brownsfan (Behold, the power of government cheese.)
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To: jimbo123
Classic limousine liberal - don't do as I do, just do as I say.
3 posted on 02/26/2013 10:38:46 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: jimbo123

She’s the perfect do-as-I-say Democrat - loaded and liberal as hell.


4 posted on 02/26/2013 10:39:27 AM PST by skeeter
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To: jimbo123

Sounds like a real morale building executive.
Maybe her next move will be to JCPenney?


5 posted on 02/26/2013 10:40:55 AM PST by nascarnation (Baraq's economic policy: trickle up poverty)
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To: jimbo123

There is something about her that has always annoyed me.


6 posted on 02/26/2013 10:43:10 AM PST by TJ Jackson
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To: brownsfan

I worked at Microsoft for 11 years. One particular woman who “worked from home” was making well into 6 figures and no one knew what the heck she was doing. She called into meetings with her kids in the car and at one point even called into the office from the gym. You cannot tell me she was earning her keep and I know there are 100s maybe 1000s more like her there.

Working from home should be an option to have only when it is necessary. Like when your pipes break and you have to be there to meet the plumber. Otherwise if these people can be in the office, they should be there. The fact that this CEO bundles for Obama has little to do with it and personally, I don’t care if she paid her own money to build a nursery at the office. That said, the PR here is very bad for her.


7 posted on 02/26/2013 10:44:23 AM PST by CityCenter (No matter how good your PR is, you can't outsmart the truth.)
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To: CityCenter

I tried the working from home thing, couldn’t stand it, I need to get out of the house.


8 posted on 02/26/2013 10:47:17 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: jimbo123

Yup. Just like mail.com (AP product), I use their free e-mails too since I was in HS. But that’s the end of my support for these Odumbo ass kissers.


9 posted on 02/26/2013 10:47:38 AM PST by max americana (Make the world a better place by punching a liberal in the face)
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To: CityCenter

You clearly are a low-paid widget-maker or just a drone.

You have no idea how the real world of technology works. I am measured on what I do, not where or even when. As long as I meet the deadlines and deliverables who cares if I did it at midnight while watching cartoons in my living room?

As for the woman you are so jealous of, what business is it of yours how much she made or how she made it? She convinced someone she was providing VALUE and worked out an accommodation perceived as worthwhile to her company.

You are one tiny-minded, jealous, control freak!


10 posted on 02/26/2013 10:49:16 AM PST by freedumb2003 (I learned everything I needed to know about racism from Colin Powell)
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To: CityCenter

Working from home is successful with some employees. But the employees that abuse it are more likely to push the Discrimination Button if you try to reign them in. Gutless managers will just punish everyone rather than deal with the abusers.


11 posted on 02/26/2013 10:50:44 AM PST by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
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To: jimbo123

Her reasoning behind why she banned working from home is pretty sound (look at the linked article at the end of this story) but for her to build a private nursery for her kid in her office is pretty bold. That is not likely to go over well but something tells me she doesn’t give a rip.


12 posted on 02/26/2013 10:51:46 AM PST by Wyatt's Torch (I can explain it to you. I can't understand it for you.)
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To: CityCenter

Presence does not equal perfomance. Good managers and leaders focus on results, managing based on delivery not on where their employees happen to be sitting for 8 hours every day.

Her actions here are a sign of a management culture that has lost control of it’s workforce, but represent a desperation measure (and likely an overreaction) to fix the problem at the expense of morale and loyalty.

It wouldn’t surprise me at all if this were an attempt to renew the culture and workforce through “voluntary” attrition that can allow fresh blood to be brought in. Very high risk, but also very high potential reward.


13 posted on 02/26/2013 10:53:03 AM PST by tanknetter
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To: freedumb2003

ROFLMAO!

Do you always take verything so personally?


14 posted on 02/26/2013 10:53:35 AM PST by CityCenter (No matter how good your PR is, you can't outsmart the truth.)
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To: jimbo123

RHIP


15 posted on 02/26/2013 10:54:19 AM PST by CGASMIA68
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To: tanknetter

You are right, presence does not equal performance but there is something that comes with being present that has value. The interactions between teams of employees can be critical to the health of the business. I have seen so much abuse of this policy and so little done about it that I can’t believe it doesn’t have an impact on the company as a whole. It also impacts the morale of those who are in the office that recognize the abuse. There’s nothing like being in a meeting listening to someone’s kids screaming in the from the backseat of their car. Creates a really productive atmosphere for sure.


16 posted on 02/26/2013 11:01:43 AM PST by CityCenter (No matter how good your PR is, you can't outsmart the truth.)
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To: freedumb2003

Both my wife and I have been on both ends of that equation.

It is my opinion she has control issues and suffers from Napolean traits. Generally the type that is Hired as CEOs now days. Screw the workers, screw the customers, just make damned sure the stocks stay worthy. Oh and by the way make sure you fix yourself up with a Golden Parachute that is absent any failure to perform on her part requirements.

Of course in her self absorbed world, She is the ONLY one that is important. Therefore she will do as she damned well pleases. She will move on after she destroys this company to the next Host she can bleed dry.


17 posted on 02/26/2013 11:08:41 AM PST by VRWCarea51
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To: CityCenter

I work from home. My company was offered the choice of losing my services entirely or letting me work from home. Since I had knowledge they valued and a proven record of getting stuff done, they kept me on.

I treat my work from home as professionally as my office time. If I’m calling in for a meeting, my toddler goes and plays on her own, elsewhere. Just because some people need adult supervision to get their jobs don’t doesn’t make it true for all of us.


18 posted on 02/26/2013 11:10:20 AM PST by JenB
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To: freedumb2003

“You are one tiny-minded, jealous, control freak!”

I agree with you completely. My daughter-in-law is a marketing manager for a well known Silicon Valley company. She has her three children in school/day care and works from home utilizing amazing computer connectivity. Like you pointed out, the measure of success is deliverables. She is highly regarded by the VP for whom she works. Sure, some people skive off in this environment, but they don’t get away with it if they are being effectively managed. They have a minimum of meetings which require her to actually go to the office. Personally, I found going to the office and the phalanx of required “meetings” an artifact of “peter principal” leaders who needed to have their hands held in the decision making process. Too many meetings are indicative of poor leaders.


19 posted on 02/26/2013 11:11:24 AM PST by vette6387
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To: freedumb2003

Ouch! But you are correct. I work on projects in up to 5 different states, all from my desk in PDX. I could easily do my job from home, and hope to do so soon. An occasional office visit for meetings is all that is really required of me. I’m salaried so if I work 40 or 60 it does not matter as long as the work gets done!


20 posted on 02/26/2013 11:13:35 AM PST by enraged
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To: CityCenter

Not necessarily, given modern day collaboration tools that allow individuals on a team to interact over distance.

The fact is, with nearly 20 years in IT and Management/Business I consistently see better collaboration here on FreeRepublic than I have in probably 90% of team situations where presence was compulsory.

To the point of when talking to people about the potential of remote collaboration I like to cite the night I lurked out here in Fall 2004 and saw Freepers deconstruct the whole Bush ANG Memo story. Which not only ensured that the hit didn’t impede Bushes reelection, it also brought down Dan Rather.

In that case, as others, there was no value in being present. It would have been a detriment actually, because it was only through remote collaboration that the knowlege necessary to expose the memo as fraudulent would have come together.


21 posted on 02/26/2013 11:13:55 AM PST by tanknetter
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To: jimbo123

Hell hath no fury like a Techie scorned. The story is a deliberate leak I’m certain. The ability to work from home is a prime reason why many people go into tech in the first place.

Also don’t tell your employees no remote work and then outsource a bunch of new tasks to Hyderabad.


22 posted on 02/26/2013 11:14:51 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: oh8eleven

She *is* telling them to “do as I do,” it’s just that she has brought in means to do so that are not available to others.


23 posted on 02/26/2013 11:15:29 AM PST by Cyber Liberty (I am a dissident. Will you join me? My name is John....)
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To: JenB

I also worked from home for part of the week for about a year. Did so because I shared an office and it gave me some needed privacy. Also realize many sales people work from their homes. I did not mean to apint everyone with the same brush, just meant to poiint out that there are people who abuse the privilege and get lost in the system, just like what happening at Yahoo. Companies need to reign that stuff in.


24 posted on 02/26/2013 11:16:17 AM PST by CityCenter (No matter how good your PR is, you can't outsmart the truth.)
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To: JenB

I’m actually surprised more companies don’t jump on this idea. Office space is not cheap.


25 posted on 02/26/2013 11:16:39 AM PST by WinMod70
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To: CityCenter
Working from home should be an option to have only when it is necessary. Like when your pipes break and you have to be there to meet the plumber. Otherwise if these people can be in the office, they should be there. Aren't you just a cute little control freak. Can we all have permission to go to the bathroom sir?

I've been working from home since 2008 and have no intention of ever going back to an office. Your example is likely failed management. My employer is very happy with me thank you very much. I have a job to do (as do my counterparts who work in the office). If I don't accomplish my work it is pretty obvious. In reality, I've gotten numerous promotions and have consistently been ranked very well during my performance reviews.

What ends up happening (at least in my case) is that I get to my "office" prior to my co-workers and push away from my desk later. You see, I don't waste time or resources traveling to and from work every day. I don't have to leave by 4:30 to catch the train. In the end, I'm sometimes the only one who is working at 5:30 because everyone that works from the office is in transit home.

If you can work from home, I would highly recommend it. It takes discipline, and a dedicated space. I have a door I can (and do) close when others are home. The woman in your example was obviously abusing her situation and a good manager would have been able to nip that in the bud. You cannot do parenting while you are working from home.

I concede that you may not have what it takes to work from home. Perhaps you require constant supervision. For each his own I guess. Just don't try to force your limitations on others.

I've been doing this successfully for a while now and my wife will be joining me shortly. Once that happens we will be able to have a lot more freedom in our lives. We can work from anywhere we wish as long as we have reliable broadband. Sure glad my boss is not a little tin-pot dictator like you appear to be.

26 posted on 02/26/2013 11:17:04 AM PST by BlueMondaySkipper (Involuntarily subsidizing the parasite class since 1981)
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To: TJ Jackson
There is something about her that has always annoyed me.

I haven't been exposed to her that much except from hearing a couple of lectures. She wasn't an uninteresting speaker but what really stood out was her strange, somewhat humorous, laugh.

27 posted on 02/26/2013 11:17:31 AM PST by wideminded
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To: tanknetter

I have no problem with a ‘work at home’ policy if that’s what a company wants for some employees.

I have a big problem with the Entitled Generation. They feel they are entitled to the freedom to make their own rules about everything. Spoiled brats, many of them. If they don’t like the burden of coming into the office - they can quit.


28 posted on 02/26/2013 11:20:30 AM PST by ladyjane (For the first time in my life I am not proud of my country.)
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To: CityCenter
Working from home should be an option to have only when it is necessary. Like when your pipes break and you have to be there to meet the plumber.

Interesting you bring this up... At my company, at least for the IT dept, the rule is you will show up at the office... Period. Which is why it took me 40 minutes to drive 3 1/2 miles to work last Thursday, and nearly 2 hours to drive home, during the heavy snow in Kansas City.

However, with the 2nd heavy snow storm in less than a week, management agreed to let IT try working remotely, and so far it's worked pretty well.

But for our department, unless there are extenuating circumstances, we work at the office. Period.

Mark

29 posted on 02/26/2013 11:21:10 AM PST by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: jimbo123

Working from home is an excellent way to ruin a marriage.

You may think it is cool, but now you are in her “nest” all day long.

The first day you tell her to turn down the radio and she will just get more bitter as time goes on.

Think about it.


30 posted on 02/26/2013 11:21:18 AM PST by FoxPro
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To: CityCenter
Every person that is on my technology team including basically everyone that I answer to is located in Penang. It makes absolutely no difference workwise whether I work from home or go into my office. I therefore work from home. I get FAR more work done from home than burning up my time, energy and gas money in commuter traffic driving to and from work each day. Since I don't have to sit in VERY stressful traffic, I will probably live a longer happier reduced stress life. That in iself makes me more productive. BTW large parts of the chip in the iPod Nano (among many others) was designed from my kitchen table.

The traffic to where Yahoo is in Silicon Valley is HORRENDEOUS. If I worked for Yahoo, I'd have my resume out faster that I write this post. Losing a companies top talent to a competitor due to stuff like this is a sure way to Chapter 11

31 posted on 02/26/2013 11:23:39 AM PST by clamper1797 (De-throne King Obozo)
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To: jimbo123

Typical liberal with top-down executive order mindset. A better approaach is to allow departments and directors to allow work from home on exception basis and let the managers work this out. In some areas like testing there may be little WFH. In other areas perhaps more. She has handled this poorly and clumsily. One size does not fit all.


32 posted on 02/26/2013 11:25:34 AM PST by plain talk
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To: jimbo123

Of course she had a nursery built into her office. She wants her kids to watch Mommy finish augering a major company right into the ground.


33 posted on 02/26/2013 11:27:35 AM PST by Orangedog (An optimist is someone who tells you to 'cheer up' when things are going his way)
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To: tanknetter

As a lab techie (with a room full of automated equipment in Arizona), I have a number of customers at our branch in Beijing. If I had to work with them face-to-face it would be a heck of a commute. The fact is, they work remotely, I work remotely and everything gets done on or ahead of schedule. There is no other way to collaborate over these distances. Time of day is more of a problem than getting things done. It’s 3:30AM there now, at the middle of my workday.

Remote working is a fact of life that gives me the flexibility to keep the balls in the air 24/7, and my company would be shooting themselves in the foot if they every tried to stop it. This Yahoo chick is a yahoo, and this bright idea of hers will fail. Unless, as another poster mentioned, she’s just trying to cause attrition, in which case it will be seen as a spectacular success.


34 posted on 02/26/2013 11:29:20 AM PST by Cyber Liberty (I am a dissident. Will you join me? My name is John....)
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To: ladyjane

You must be another widget maker like me. ;-)


35 posted on 02/26/2013 11:29:57 AM PST by CityCenter (No matter how good your PR is, you can't outsmart the truth.)
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To: jimbo123

I once worked at home. Didn’t do squat on some days (except cleaning my garage), and produced more than I would have at the office on others. There are serious legal problems for the employers when it comes to working at home, and I’m not sure if they are ever resolved to the satisfaction of companies’ legal departments. What happens when you have an accident while “working at home”? One example.


36 posted on 02/26/2013 11:30:22 AM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: CityCenter
One particular woman who “worked from home” was making well into 6 figures and no one knew what the heck she was doing. She called into meetings with her kids in the car and at one point even called into the office from the gym.

Why do you care where she is or what she's doing while she earns her paycheck? Why do you care how much she makes? You sound like a bit of a liberal control freak yourself. Maybe a jealous one to boot.

37 posted on 02/26/2013 11:32:29 AM PST by Cyber Liberty (I am a dissident. Will you join me? My name is John....)
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To: jimbo123

Might be there's another reason that Marissa wants to have junior nearby ...

38 posted on 02/26/2013 11:33:28 AM PST by Zakeet (Democracy is the art and science of running the circus from the monkey cage - Mencken)
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To: ladyjane

It’s a function of leadership and management to keep things like a sense of entitlement in it’s proper place.

Doing so requires the ability to effectively balance various forces. The “Entitlement Generation” as you describe it, happens to be approx 80 million strong. Just as big as the Baby Boomers. They aren’t going to leave much choice in the matter, you might as well step out in front of a speeding semi, hold up your hand and order it to stop, for all the good it’ll do you.

Like I said, this strikes me as a situation where management has allowed a culture to get out of control. It needs to be addressed, but simply ordering people back into the office is an incredibly risky, if not short sighted, route to take.


39 posted on 02/26/2013 11:35:10 AM PST by tanknetter
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To: CityCenter

I note that you use the word “presence” as something that has value in the work environment. The idea of presence has been undergoing a radical change over the past dozen years or so. I work for an enormous software company that utilizes “virtual presence” to its competitive advantage, and it provides an excellent work-life balance to its employees. By combining team workspaces, audio conferencing, video conferencing, instant messaging, calendaring and email into a seamless tool, all of the aspects of presence are accomodated. In a global corporation, where a functional team might consist of folks in the US, UK, Australia and India, being able to use this type of tool is invaluable. I know, because its my job, along with my team, to run the beastie. Our feedback is consistently good (like 89% approval of an IT group by its user base - virtually unheard of). We can also hire people based on their skill set - and location is irrelevant.

On a personal note - I’ve worked at home using this technology for six years now. I touch base with my cohorts in the UK in the morning and in Australia in the early evening. I welcome my daughter home from school every afternoon. My dogs are at my feet, and some days I work in my pajamas. But I do my job very very well, or so say my bosses. Some days I work 9 - 5, other days 11 - 8, and occasionally 7 - 11...it all depends on the requirements of the day. I’ve stopped putting over 12,000 miles per year on my car, and my deparment is not cross-charged for office space used. My work environment is far superior to what I would have at the office - I have a much better chair, better lighting, superior systems equipment. If for some reason I do go into the office, I make use of what we call a “hotel cube” for the day - simply a vacant office available to company nomads.

It works out well for all involved - especially the company, which keeps its cost of doing business very low and its employees happy. All that is required are motivated, honest employees and a company that is a meritocracy, not a totalitarian hypocrite’s paradise, like Yahoo is shaping up to be.


40 posted on 02/26/2013 11:38:36 AM PST by Ol' Sox (Those who advocate should be first in line to experience the consequences of their convictions.)
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To: CityCenter

In my line of work, I’ve found that the ideal is to work from home two days a week. That allows me to work uninterrupted while still maintaining contact with colleagues.


41 posted on 02/26/2013 11:40:57 AM PST by Squawk 8888 (True North- Strong Leader, Strong Dollar, Strong and Free!)
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To: MarkL

That’s actually a very dangerous position for a company to take. Both legally and ethically.

If someone dies trying to get into work, or get home, under such circumstance (major blizzard) because the company mandates they do so, then the company can be held liable.


42 posted on 02/26/2013 11:42:11 AM PST by tanknetter
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To: CityCenter

Going to an office five days a week when the work could be done remotely is wasteful and indicative of ignorance, laziness, or managers who cannot judge employees by results.


43 posted on 02/26/2013 11:42:18 AM PST by morphing libertarian
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To: jimbo123
I heard the "end of working at home" announcement a few days ago. I did that successfully from 1983 through 2008. I only visited the office when it was necessary to have face to face meetings to make work go faster or do a presentation. I was forced out of the work at home mode when Obama took office. My only work choices required being physically on site and 900 miles from home. Now the company has to pay rent for an office, phone and networking costs that I shouldered at my expense for all those years.
44 posted on 02/26/2013 11:47:11 AM PST by Myrddin
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FYI: when she was hired as Yahoo CEO she then admitted she was pregnant.


45 posted on 02/26/2013 11:48:53 AM PST by ctdonath2 (3% of the population perpetrates >50% of homicides...but gun control advocates blame metal boxes.)
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To: dfwgator
The down side of working from home is...you're always at the office. People have no respect for "office hours". I would get calls starting at 7 AM and running until midnight. I worked with people all around the globe, so it was hard to put limits on "hours". My productivity was far better than at the office. The computer hardware I purchased for myself far exceeded anything the company was willing to supply. I paid for my own internet connectivity so there was no danger of being accused of misappropriation of company resources. Having a zero length commute translated to more productive hours each day.

I have another down side. My basement is still filled with specialized hardware from my railroad work. The contract ended in Dec 2008 and the customer never appropriated money to repatriate the "stuff". I really want it gone. Since it was a government contract, I have to maintain a careful inventory and track the return of every little bit.

46 posted on 02/26/2013 11:54:32 AM PST by Myrddin
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To: Orangedog
Of course she had a nursery built into her office. She wants her kids to watch Mommy finish augering a major company right into the ground.

Yep - that's what her mission from Google is! I'm amazed people don't see this. Her job is to take over and destroy Yahoo from within for Google - she's Yahoo's Obama. Whether by bankruptcy and collapse or a takeover scenario by Google or a Google ally, that's what Mayer is there to do.

At which point Google will welcome her back as president of Google.

47 posted on 02/26/2013 11:55:51 AM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: jimbo123

Don’t Yahoo or Facebook. They’ll turn over your info to the regime without a warrant.


48 posted on 02/26/2013 11:56:51 AM PST by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed &water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS, NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: Cyber Liberty

None of the above.

I cared at the time because of the ruckus she created for everyone she worked with and that included me.

Wendy, is that you?


49 posted on 02/26/2013 11:59:23 AM PST by CityCenter (No matter how good your PR is, you can't outsmart the truth.)
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To: freedumb2003; CityCenter
You clearly are a low-paid widget-maker or just a drone...You are one tiny-minded, jealous, control freak!

freedumb, you make a nice point about people who work independently like yourself...not sure how CityCenter deserves the rest of the comment. CityCenter just seems to be offering a different perspective based on his view of the world.

50 posted on 02/26/2013 12:00:48 PM PST by jwsea55
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