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FreeP "LS" on Cspan's "BookTV"
CSpan BookTV ^ | 3/10/2013 | US Navy Vet

Posted on 03/10/2013 1:25:46 PM PDT by US Navy Vet

3 hours of "LS"


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Philosophy; US: Ohio
KEYWORDS: booktv; cspan; ls
Well worth the time.
1 posted on 03/10/2013 1:25:46 PM PDT by US Navy Vet
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To: US Navy Vet

What is the book?


2 posted on 03/10/2013 1:27:19 PM PDT by Tublecane
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To: US Navy Vet

bump for Larry


3 posted on 03/10/2013 1:28:19 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: LS

Bump


4 posted on 03/10/2013 1:29:33 PM PDT by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
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To: Tublecane

Talks a little(OK alot) about all his books.


5 posted on 03/10/2013 1:30:12 PM PDT by US Navy Vet (Go Packers! Go Rockies! Go Boston Bruins! See, I'm "Diverse"!)
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To: US Navy Vet

As well as other Historical Commentary.


6 posted on 03/10/2013 1:30:42 PM PDT by US Navy Vet (Go Packers! Go Rockies! Go Boston Bruins! See, I'm "Diverse"!)
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To: US Navy Vet

Thanks!


7 posted on 03/10/2013 1:37:29 PM PDT by ChocChipCookie
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To: US Navy Vet

For more information, visit patriotshistoryusa.com.

8 posted on 03/10/2013 1:41:25 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: US Navy Vet

Watched every minute of it. LS was great.

I’d like for him to expound more on his ideas of competitive money markets. Would have liked to be on that trip he took down the Rhine with Milton Friedman.


9 posted on 03/10/2013 1:43:47 PM PDT by A'elian' nation (Political correctness does not legislate tolerance; it only organizes hatred. Jacques Barzun)
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To: US Navy Vet

did he mention FR?

:p


10 posted on 03/10/2013 1:59:02 PM PDT by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: US Navy Vet
I have his book ...patriots guide...

Will try to catch it the show,

11 posted on 03/10/2013 2:08:55 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ((The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?))
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To: US Navy Vet
Cool....online viewing:

http://www.booktv.org/Featured/14332/In+Depth+Larry+Schweikart.aspx

12 posted on 03/10/2013 2:11:30 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ((The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?))
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I’ll have to check it out!


13 posted on 03/10/2013 3:18:19 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: US Navy Vet

His “48 Liberal Lies..” is currently residing on top of my coffee table.


14 posted on 03/10/2013 4:21:36 PM PDT by driftless2
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To: US Navy Vet

Thought LS was Larry Sinclair


15 posted on 03/10/2013 4:45:33 PM PDT by JohnnyP
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To: Tublecane

It was about all of my books, “Patriot’s History of the United States,” “American Entrepreneur,” “48 Liberal Lies About American History,” “Seven Events that Made America America,” and “Patriot’s History of the Modern World.”


16 posted on 03/10/2013 5:06:21 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: smokingfrog

Terrific picture. Thanks.


17 posted on 03/10/2013 5:06:43 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: A'elian' nation
Well, it was indeed a trip. There were five Nobel Prize winners on that boat. I got next to Friedman and asked him how, if he supports freedom in every other endeavor, he favored government control over the money supply. I reminded him that the period 1840-1860 had no government control of money whatsoever and we had a growing economy and no bank failures. (People point to the Panic of 1857, but Prof. Charles Calomiris and I showed that that panic was the result of the Dred Scott case, NOT bank "failures").

Friedman really had no answer that I could even re-state to you. Something about, "Someone has to set the value of money" or the "unit of account," to which I replied that "someone does"---the MARKET. There wasn't much else to the conversation. He had no answer for the period 1840-1860.

18 posted on 03/10/2013 5:13:38 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: JohnnyP

Not hardly.


19 posted on 03/10/2013 5:14:12 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: driftless2

I think we’re close to a contract on a sequel, “48 MORE Liberal Lies about History” that I will co-author with Burton Folsom of “New Deal or Raw Deal?”


20 posted on 03/10/2013 5:16:00 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: US Navy Vet; LS


21 posted on 03/10/2013 5:19:55 PM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: Liberty Valance

22 posted on 03/10/2013 5:28:57 PM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: LS

Thank you LS for taking the time to reply. I admit I haven’t given much thought to competitive money markets. Would it work like the monetary system in Europe before the advent of the Euro?

I recently purchased something from Amazon.de (Deutschland) and paid the Euro difference. Would it work the same way in the states with Amazon having to weight the value of money from each state or competitive market? There was a reason after all why Europe went for the idea of a commonly held unit of money. I’m sure the idea sounded good at the time.

Could competitive money markets work in this day and age as opposed to the days of 1840 when most commerce presumably was done intra-state ? In which one of your books do you tackle this subject?

Finally, why the lack of interest in being a European tourist?

Thank you again for a captivating and thought-provoking three hours on C-span.


23 posted on 03/13/2013 3:36:59 PM PDT by A'elian' nation (Political correctness does not legislate tolerance; it only organizes hatred. Jacques Barzun)
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To: A'elian' nation
Yes, exactly like the franc vs. pound vs. mark prior to the EU. I don't have any book that specifically lays out competitive money. My "Banking in the American South" discusses the situation in the south from 1830-1861 and notes the favorable situation there. Mostly I got stuff from articles in the Journal of Ec History or Amer Ec Review. A lot of articles (cited in my notes) deal with "free banking."

I see NO reason why competitive money couldn't work today.

My one trip to Europe was not pleasant, even though I had first class accomodations: bed too small, tv yucky, was not fond of the food (even though I had my only 9-course meal there). Just nothing I can't see on the internet.

24 posted on 03/13/2013 4:26:12 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS

Alas, the renowned LS reveals himself to be a non-romantic. Not for him are castles, cathedrals, cobblestones, konditoreis, palaces, quaint medieval shops and taverns, the Matterhorn, and lederhosen ( even stranger considering his surname ) lol

Not to mention the two things the country of America unfathomably cannot produce - real beer and real bread.

I regard myself fortunate to have USA-German dual citizenship. Enables me to keep jumping from pan to fire and vice versa.

Am honored to have had this repartee with you LS, and I will be researching competitive money. Danke Schoen.


25 posted on 03/15/2013 2:14:22 PM PDT by A'elian' nation (Political correctness does not legislate tolerance; it only organizes hatred. Jacques Barzun)
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To: A'elian' nation

LOL. No response to that!


26 posted on 03/15/2013 2:20:48 PM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS

I have to say I’m also a little fuzzy on the 1840-1860 stuff.


27 posted on 03/15/2013 2:21:49 PM PDT by Deb (If you wanna laugh everyday, follow Deepak Chopra on Twitter)
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To: Deb
Ok, worked like this: pre-1863, banks had to get "charters" from the state legislatures. That charter authorized the bank to print its own notes. Those banknotes had to be convertible into gold or silver ("specie") on demand. But the concept of "Fractional Reserve Banking" meant that at any given time only a very small % of people would come in to convert their paper into metal. So banks traditionally kept about a 6-10% specie reserve and loaned out 90% more via bank notes.

Every bank, and a few railroad and insurance companies, printed these notes. They all competed against each other in the free market. If a bank couldn't "convert" into specie, word got around and people would quickly come in to unload their notes. Moreover, if you failed to convert (in theory) the legislature would yank your charter.

Businesses and other banks knew the value of these notes through a publication called "Dillistin's Bank Note Reporter." Everyone had a copy, updated annually. So unless a note was very new, or from a bank that no one had heard of, you could tell instantly at what value the bank notes were trading.

Anything less than 99% (i.e., a dollar of the Exchange Bank of St. Louis would get you 99 cents) was not very reputable. All notes traded at a VERY slight discount because at the end of the day, the Liberty Bank of Dayton, OH would have to send back all its Exchange Bank of St. Louis notes to St. Louis, and vice versa. So there was a shipping "charge". Otherwise, the notes were literally as good as gold, or as good as people believed you had gold in your vault to back them with.

From 1840-1860, we had no Bank of the United States---no federal "regulator" as it were. The private banks did just fine. VERY few failed, and those that did failed in the Panic of 1857, which was caused by the Dred Scott case (as I show in my "Seven Events" book. It was the most stable period of money we have ever had.

28 posted on 03/17/2013 8:17:39 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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