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To: EBH

The farm is in Eastern Oklahoma and it is horrible. I’d hate to see worse. SE Texas is worse than people may think. Shocked to not see Texas listed.

People tried drilling in winter forage but it was like trying to scratch rock. Pasture drills went way up last fall. I suspect there will be a lot on the market soon. Ditto for farms and even more cows. Not just a forage problem but now a drinking water problem. Ponds are drying up completely in lots of places. No runoff.

I was around in the 50’s and I’d say this is worse. It just seems to drag on and on and on. I think in 57-58 the floods finally came.


6 posted on 03/21/2013 2:53:26 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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To: Sequoyah101
It just seems to drag on and on and on.

There's a lot of that feeling to go around these days.

8 posted on 03/21/2013 2:55:45 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: Sequoyah101

I am in North East Ohio...big lake out there ya’ know...

So feeling the water pinch is really just a matter of how much your want to pay. Folks who grow backyard plots here will be OK, but the bigger farms it is gonna hurt.

Hopefully a few more FReepers will weigh in on their conditons.

It does though make me chuckle to think the sewar district now charges us for water run-off. Well...what run-off?


9 posted on 03/21/2013 2:57:16 PM PDT by EBH ( American citizens do not negotiate with political terrorists.)
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To: Sequoyah101
I was around in the 50’s and I’d say this is worse. It just seems to drag on and on and on. I think in 57-58 the floods finally came.

Thanks for the personal perspective. Always valuable.

13 posted on 03/21/2013 2:59:40 PM PDT by SomeCallMeTim ( The best minds are not in government. If any were, business would hire them)
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To: Sequoyah101

2013 Long-Range Weather Forecast for Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

http://www.almanac.com/weather/longrange/OK/Oklahoma%20City


14 posted on 03/21/2013 3:00:00 PM PDT by SVTCobra03 (You can never have enough friends, horsepower or ammunition.)
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To: Sequoyah101

And to significantly aggravate the problem, you have significant numbers of people moving to Texas from other parts of the country(and south of the border) with all the extra water needs.


17 posted on 03/21/2013 3:03:00 PM PDT by MachIV
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To: Sequoyah101
I was around in the 50’s and I’d say this is worse. It just seems to drag on and on and on. I think in 57-58 the floods finally came.

I grew up in Central Texas in the 1950s. Here, the seven year drought in 1950s was worse. For example, the Llano River went completely dry for a couple of months in the 1950s. As bad as it got here during the last two years, the Llano River has never gone completely dry (even though there are a lot more people pulling water from it now).

22 posted on 03/21/2013 3:17:33 PM PDT by Bubba_Leroy (The Obamanation Continues)
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To: Sequoyah101; EBH

I’m also surprised Texas isn’t listed. Everytime in the past that drought caused a massive sell off of livestock caused a decrease in the price at the grocery store but not this time. It was obvious the grocery price was manipulated. The increase in prices should have come after when the ranchers were trying to restock their herds.

I’m also surprised Texas isn’t listed. Someone mentioned the Llano River wasn’t completely dry but it almost was. The town of Llano, as well as several others around the state, were out of drinking water and were considering hauling it in by rail. Most cities around the state had outside watering bans with fines up to $1000 and more. Llano lucked out because the city council went out on a limb and hired a water witcher who found a water supply literally at the last minute. The Llano River is part of chain of lakes called the Highland Lakes which furnishes water and power for Central Texas. They were so low that there were only two boat ramps that were open by the end of that summer. Businesses that rely on the rivers have had year after year of dry river beds that they called it quits and closed. The hills are covered with dead trees and are still fire hazards. There’s barely a day that goes by that we’re not in a fire watch. Just a couple weeks ago, the river authority cut off water to the south Texas rice growers because there is no water to spare. It’s already reached 90 degrees so we’re expecting another long HOT dry summer.


44 posted on 03/21/2013 4:31:19 PM PDT by bgill
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To: Sequoyah101

My MIL has a ranch and it is a good thing she doesn’t have to make a living off of it and is fast going in the hole. Between the costs of the ranch and her assisted living she could run out of money in a few years. I don’t think there is a market for dried out ranches either.


53 posted on 03/21/2013 5:09:07 PM PDT by tiki
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