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Mulberry harbour built off Normandy after D-Day uncovered on the seabed 69 years later
Daily Mail ^ | 23rd March 2013 | Martin Robinson

Posted on 03/23/2013 2:21:03 PM PDT by the scotsman

'These ghostly images reveal the forgotten harbour built off the coast of Normandy that for six months after D-Day became the world's busiest docks.

British scientists have found the remnants of Mulberry B on the Channel seabed, which allowed the Allies to land troops, vehicles and equipment on French soil without having to capture a port first.

The makeshift harbour, nicknamed Port Winston because it was the brainchild of Churchill, was the size of Dover and is considered to be one of the greatest military achievements of all time.

Its development was even described by Albert Speer - Hitler's architect and armaments minister - as 'genius'.

It allowed 220,000 men, 50,000 vehicles and 600,000 tones of supplies to be landed in France and undoubtedly helped win the war.

Experts from the UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO), which is part of the Ministry of Defence, have found that its structure still remains remarkably intact just months before the 69th anniversary of its construction.

They fired a 'multi-beam echo sounder' at the sea bed off Arromanches Sur Mer and the 3D images it produced show that large sunken 'beetles', which supported floating roadways, can be found at a depth of five metres.

There are also large chunks of breakwater structures. which protected it from storms.

'It was amazing to discover how much remained despite being pounded by the sea for all those years,' said Chris Howlett, who was leading the UKHO research.'

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: dday; godsgravesglyphs; mulberryb; portwinston; unitedkingdom; ww2; wwii

1 posted on 03/23/2013 2:21:03 PM PDT by the scotsman
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To: the scotsman

We forget what we owe Winston. And of course, the socialists in all countries pi** on his memory.

They all need to go.


2 posted on 03/23/2013 2:35:01 PM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (Vendetta))
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To: the scotsman

Incredible engineering and execution. It could have all gone wrong, and tens of thousands of allies would have perished in quick order.


3 posted on 03/23/2013 2:54:42 PM PDT by Jacquerie ("How few were left who had seen the republic!" - Tacitus, The Annals)
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To: Hardraade
Someone asked me years ago who I thought was the greatest figure of the twentieth century. My answer was hands down, Winston Churchill. And that from a Yank. Towering leader, awesome author and credible artist. Who better? Anyone? sd
4 posted on 03/23/2013 3:24:11 PM PDT by shotdog (I love my country. It's our government I'm afraid of.)
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To: zot

D-Day ping


5 posted on 03/23/2013 3:28:11 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: the scotsman

God only knows how much larger and faster built it would have been if half of the men creating it, had been replaced with females.

I guess we will find out those things in our next major war, after we learn Chinese.


6 posted on 03/23/2013 3:52:23 PM PDT by ansel12 (" I would not be in the United States Senate if it wasnt for Sarah Palin " Cruz said.)
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To: shotdog; Hardraade
"What General Weygand called the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilization. Upon it depends our own British life, and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us.

Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this Island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science.

Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'

In my opinion, one of the greatest orations of all time. Gives me goosebumps to read it.

7 posted on 03/23/2013 4:01:55 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: shotdog

And the left hated him so much they could hardly wait till after the war with kicking him out.

Now, their bronze statue of him is in a straitjacket.

They all need guillotined. And their heads on pikes.


8 posted on 03/23/2013 4:02:02 PM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (Vendetta))
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To: the scotsman

The Seabees built “A” and it was completed before “B”. I’ve read that typical American attitude was build it fast, get the job done then throw it away.

I wonder if any of it is on the seabed.


9 posted on 03/23/2013 4:04:25 PM PDT by Terry Mross (This country will fail to exist in my lifetime. And I'm gettin' up there in age.)
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To: shotdog

Churchill recognized the communists for exactly what they were. FDR (that piece of crap) thought it would be okay to deal with them.

Joseph McCarthy knew exactly the extent of the communist infiltration into our government, particularly the FDR and Truman administrations.

I have always felt that McCarthy had a source feeding him Venona information.


10 posted on 03/23/2013 4:08:30 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: Terry Mross
When I was a dependent living in Yokosuka, Japan, They had what appeared to be a 20 foot statue of THIS:

Hands down, one of the best logos of all time.

11 posted on 03/23/2013 4:17:48 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: rlmorel

Thanks! I was proud to wear it.


12 posted on 03/23/2013 4:19:31 PM PDT by Terry Mross (This country will fail to exist in my lifetime. And I'm gettin' up there in age.)
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To: the scotsman

An engineering masterpiece. So was PLUTO. Pipeline Under the Ocean. 6” lines prefabricated and coiled then spooled off across the channel for petroleum products. Fuel kept everything rolling of course.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nv9lBqPVuoE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Pluto

The very idea of high pressure piston pumps moving gasoline is not common even today. Centrifugals are most commonly used as they are safer.


13 posted on 03/23/2013 5:11:23 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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To: Terry Mross

Thank you, Terry Mross, and thank you for your service.

I have to say, there’s a special place in my heart for the Seabees.

My father got orders to Yokosuka, Japan when I was nine years old. When we got there, there were no quarters available for us. I was one of a family of eight, so we had to stay somewhere while we waited for housing to become available.

We ended up staying at the base motel for, I think 2 to 3 weeks. I recall that my mother and father had a room of their own, and all six of us kids crowded into one motel room ourselves. That’s the first time that I lived somewhere where I could actually see all the way out to the ocean. Everyplace else I had lived was either a suburb somewhere, or housing on a base near the harbor facilities. Yokosuka was like that as well, but looking out from our motel, we could see out to the Pacific. My initial memory of that place was a lot of gray sky, and lots of gray choppy water. I remember going down the beach right next to the motel, and looking out at the U.S. Navy ships heading seaward or heading to port. I stood there on the beach and watched their gray forms heading out to to the open ocean, their masts sticking up above the horizon until they disappeared. There were long lengths of enormous anchor chains on that beach, completely encrusted with rust and eroded. I remember there were long lines of them, just sitting on top of or half buried in the sand.

But it’s interesting, the thing I remember most, is that great big huge Seabee statue on top of that pedestal, the Thompson with that disc magazine in one articulated arm, the other ones holding hammers, wrenches or some other implement of construction. I remember each arm had a blue sleeve, with a red enlisted sleeve insignia on it.

There it was, the big yellow and black striped abdomen with that big stinger on one end, and the grimacing face on the other end with the Dixie cup on top.

I can tell you, I spent many hours walking around that thing because I was so completely bored that I couldn’t think of anything else to do. We weren’t in school, didn’t have any friends, and weren’t allowed to go anywhere, so we had to hang around in the immediate vicinity of the motel. And that statue was right there.

When we finally got our quarters assigned (we were waiting for some other officer and his family to move out) we discovered that we were right next to the Seabees barracks. We thought those guys were just great. They would be sending out on the concrete steps, shooting the breeze, and we would stand around talking to them, sometimes six or seven of us, sometimes just myself. I look back on it now, and I recognize that many of those men had families of their own that they couldn’t be with, so I think they were extra nice with us.

There was one Seabee in particular, he was a petty officer, and his last name was Barker. (We didn’t have to ask, we read it off of his chest… :-) He was a nice guy, he had a very broad face, and short, very curly hair. He actually looked Irish. One day, he had a cardboard box with a puppy inside it. It was predictable, we went running inside the house holding the puppy, and my mother shot a poisonous glare through the front window towards the Seabees barracks, but she let us keep the dog.

We ended up naming him “Brutus”.


14 posted on 03/23/2013 5:28:52 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: rlmorel
If I may...

"What Barack Obama called the Battle to Enforce Liberalism is over. I expect that the new Battle is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of American civilization. Upon it depends our own way of life, and the long continuity of our institutions and our future. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us.

Obama knows that he will have to break us in this battle or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all America may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including our United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that if America and her Allies last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.

And I consider myself lucky to have shared the air with Sir Winston, a true statesman of the first order!

15 posted on 03/23/2013 5:42:23 PM PDT by W. (It's five o'clock somewhere...)
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To: the scotsman

Very cool. Arromanches (Gold Beach) was one of the stops we made on the tour of D-Day landing beaches I took in May 2006. Wish I could go back.


16 posted on 03/23/2013 5:56:14 PM PDT by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
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To: Terry Mross

Here is a SeaBee story from Vietnam:
http://bswett.com/RVN/ThapChamWell.html


17 posted on 03/23/2013 6:47:25 PM PDT by zot
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To: GreyFriar

It was a great piece of work. Thanks for the ping.


18 posted on 03/23/2013 6:48:36 PM PDT by zot
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To: W.

THAT is why the oration is timeless!

Well done.


19 posted on 03/23/2013 6:52:15 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: the scotsman
The elderly British battleship HMS Centurion was scuttled off Normandy to act as a breakwater for the Mulberry harbor at Omaha Beach.

One of dozens of elderly warships and freighters that were to be scuttled off the beachheads to help break up the wave action so that it wouldn't wreck the artificial harbors, Centurion had been decommissioned in the 1920's as part of the Washington Naval Treaty and turned into a target ship. She served in the Mediterranean for most of the war, armed with fake 13.5-inch guns, to keep the Italian Navy from launching a battleship raid on Alexandria Harbor in Egypt.

As their small caretaker crews maneuvered them into position, the thirteen freighters scheduled to be scuttled off Omaha Beach came under fire from the field artillery batteries of the German 352d Division. The German gunners were jubilant when their shells seemed to be sinking Allied freighters left and right. Then the Centurion came steaming in and they knew they were going to be in for a tough fight. They'd only fired a couple of salvos at the massive battleship when it was suddenly rocked by a series of explosions and began settling in the water.

The German military proudly announced that they'd sunk a British battleship, which sank so quickly that only "seventy men were able to escape", never realizing that there were only seventy men onboard in the first place.

20 posted on 03/23/2013 7:21:00 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson (Molon Labe!)
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To: rlmorel

One of my all time favorites, as well.

Listen here: http://ia601207.us.archive.org/26/items/WinstonS.ChurchillsWarSpeeches/Churchill400618IrFinestHour.mp3


21 posted on 03/23/2013 7:48:59 PM PDT by Peter W. Kessler (Dirt is for racing... asphalt is for getting there.)
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To: rlmorel

Thanks, and it was my pleasure!


22 posted on 03/23/2013 7:50:01 PM PDT by W. (It's five o'clock somewhere...)
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To: ansel12
God only knows how much larger and faster built it would have been if half of the men creating it, had been replaced with females.

I guess we will find out those things in our next major war, after we learn Chinese.

I know what you mean. Women in the front lines will be a disaster. However, don't sell your sisters short. Look at all they did on the home front in WW2. Remember Rosie the Riveter.

23 posted on 03/23/2013 7:53:35 PM PDT by RobinOfKingston (Democrats--the party of Evil. Republicans--the party of Stupid.)
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To: RobinOfKingston

Rosie the Riveter was not the great success story that it was portrayed as for propaganda reasons, and common sense alone would indicate that the reality was probably a little less than what we pretended it to be, after all, do we really think that little of our skilled factory men of the time, that women could just walk in off the street and poof! be equal to, or even superior to, the actual skilled factory workers, with their superior skill and strength, and aptitude and years in the field?


24 posted on 03/23/2013 8:11:40 PM PDT by ansel12 (" I would not be in the United States Senate if it wasnt for Sarah Palin " Cruz said.)
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To: RobinOfKingston

No women in the first wave, period, that’s the muscle part of the deal. Second wave, sure, the gals can shoot as good as us guys, seen them pick the lid off a jug of antifreeze at 100 yards with a .22 Ruger rifle. Yay gun gals!


25 posted on 03/23/2013 8:13:54 PM PDT by W. (It's five o'clock somewhere...)
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To: the scotsman

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks the scotsman.

Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


26 posted on 03/23/2013 9:22:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: rlmorel

And they still have watchdogs stealing potentially embarassing McCarthy documents right out of the national archives.


27 posted on 03/23/2013 11:33:06 PM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (Vendetta))
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To: the scotsman

I grew up with a section of Mulberry Harbour parked just down the road from where we lived in Portsmouth. For some reason it never made it across the Channel, and was left high and dry in Langstone Harbour about 50 yards offshore. Made a great fishing platform.


28 posted on 03/24/2013 1:41:57 AM PDT by Winniesboy
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To: rlmorel

Nice to know that at least one person shares my opinion of FDR. sd


29 posted on 03/24/2013 4:15:36 AM PDT by shotdog (I love my country. It's our government I'm afraid of.)
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To: Hardraade

The British public saw the Tories as the party who failed to keep us out of a world war. It was more that than any dislike for Churchill.

Also Labour’s 1945 manifesto promised a ‘new Jerusalem’, with a health service, new housing, increased wages, all of which seemed wonderful to people whose lives and houses had been literally shattered by six years of war.

I can fully understand why people thought they would be better to lead Britain postwar.


30 posted on 03/24/2013 4:49:40 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: Terry Mross

The story is the Americans built it much quicker, BUT because they had only secured every sixth bolt. Whilst the British secured everything.


31 posted on 03/24/2013 4:50:54 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

ping


32 posted on 03/24/2013 4:55:43 AM PDT by abb
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To: rlmorel

McCarthy was a bull in a china shop, and whilst there WERE as now know many communists in high places, McCarthy’s campaign ended up being the best thing the Communists could have hoped for, as his campaign was so blundering that people accused became figures of sympathy and considered innocent just by virtue of being accused.

I doubt he was getting Venona intel.

There were communists in high places, but frankly McCarthy was a fool, and the recent move to make him a sage and hero is ridiculous. His stupidity and blundering HARMED the anticommunist cause, and HELPED communist infiltration of America.

The real American heroes are the men and women of the FBI and other agencies who hunted down and arrested sleepers and spies. Not a blundering idiot from Wisconsin.


33 posted on 03/24/2013 4:57:55 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: Terry Mross

Whether the story is true, I dont know.


34 posted on 03/24/2013 5:00:02 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: the scotsman

That is true, of course. Labour was doing what socialists have done at all times. Nowadays, though, there is no excuse for their despicable statue of Churchill in a straitjacket.


35 posted on 03/24/2013 5:58:30 AM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (Vendetta))
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To: Hardraade

Straitjacket?. What ARE you talking about?.


36 posted on 03/24/2013 6:54:31 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: Hardraade

Right, I googled what you said.

Its a statue of him by a mental health charity made to highlight mental illness. Churchill himself suffered from depression. The statue was up for a month, then taken down.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4795832.stm


37 posted on 03/24/2013 6:58:58 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: Hardraade

Actually after public complaints, it was taken down after just a few days. I can see why people complained, I can see why others thought it was a clever and intelligent way to highlight mental illness.


38 posted on 03/24/2013 7:00:26 AM PDT by the scotsman (i)
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To: the scotsman

You could not be more wrong, in my opinion and you and I will differ on this, The Scotsman.

What happened to the public perception of McCarthy was not due to his actions, except in a few rare cases, but was instead a full out assault by the media and the liberals on him, and that is a fact.

It should be an educational tool used today, to illuminate how the left and the media smear anyone who gets in their way af achieving their liberal utopia. What they did to McCarthy worked, and what they do to conservatives, works.

It is like Charlie Brown kicking the football that is constantly pulled away by Lucy. yet still we do it.

If McCarthy was blundering and insensitive...who was going to do the job of getting into the public eye? Was it going to be Tidings? Ha. no, his job was to protect himself then his office then the presidency, and lastly, his country. Was it going to be someone like Lodge? Fat chance. McCarthy was the only one with enough stones to do it.

If we were infested with actual Soviet communist agents, communist wanna-be’s and outright communist sympathizers at all layers of our government, right up to and including the VP Wallace, I am far more concerned with THAT fact historically than the fact that the NYT wanted to paint McCarthy as a fool and a racist for persistently questioning Annie Lee Moss. (I choose HER as an example, because she is the one most ignorant people toss out as an example of his carelessness and treatment of people who appeared in front of him, treated her as his typical victim, plucked from their happy American life and thrown down amongst the carcasses, skull and empty rib cases int the arena in front of his table for no reason at all.

Yes. We will disagree on this.


39 posted on 03/24/2013 7:51:56 AM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: Hardraade

One only has to read the prologue the the book “Blacklisted by History” (Written, by the way. by someone who was THERE when all this was going down, and used independent research to reach his conclusions, not like the vast majority who used large circular references to cover themselves)

This guy talks about going to retrieve a file that should contain one of the most important documents of the entire fight: The Klaus document, which started the whole thing.

Thing is, there are two major sites where the document SHOULD be, but is missing. One copy of this document should been found in the legislative archive of the Tydings panel. According to documentation and records, it should be there, but it isn’t. And according to the author, the other place where this memo ought to be’s and the papers of Sam Klaus which should be in another area of the archives. But it isn’t. There’s a note that says it was withdrawn in 1993, but nothing indicating who took it or why they took it.

And now it’s gone. According to the author who has done considerable and intensive first-person research (in comparison to his detractors who prefer to take the words of known Communists and government officials aiding them at their word as the gospel truth) notes that in his travels through the dark seamy undergrounds of official documentation, there are dozens and dozens of places where important documents should be found, only to discover upon physical examination “the material being searched for and was once enclosed has been stripped from the coversheet leaving small wads of paper beneath the staples that held the documents together.”

But when you look at these, you’ll at least have an indication that there was indeed something there. The cover sheets for the documents are still there signed by people like Dean Atcheson, but the documents to cover sheets refer to are long gone leaving the previously mentioned wads of paper stuck between the Staples.

And then of course, one of the most documents of all (important to the people who are trying to destroy McCarthy, not to people who were curious as to the extent of communist infiltration of our government) was a letter from Joseph McCarthy to Millard Tydings listing the names of 80 loyalty or security suspects whom he had previously openly cited in the Senate. This particular document or part of an official proceeding of the Senate, we know they were provided according to the author, but they are gone. There’s no explanation, nothing. Just gone. It wasn’t as if somebody had gone in under official auspices logged out the document under their name, remove the document with an appropriate official explanation, and so on. This was someone who obviously who had access to the documentation and just did it.

Even more interestingly, Joseph McCarthy’s famous speech in Wheeling West Virginia has become a thing of legend. When the researcher attempted to get a copy of the newspaper article from the day after Joseph McCarthy speech, he examined what he called “the morgue” of articles and he found that the newspaper had changed. They no longer had newspaper articles back to before and including the 1950s. They were all now on microfilm. That didn’t seem to present too much of a problem, so he went to where the microphones were stored and he found historical documents of the paper dating up to December 1949 before stopping cold. The sequence then inexplicably resumed in March 1950.

Most interesting. That happens to be exactly a timeframe the McCarthy articles were in. Funny… It is almost as if “someone” were trying to make McCarthy become an “un-person”. Hmm. I wonder who would be trying to do such a thing?


40 posted on 03/24/2013 8:32:05 AM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: shotdog

He gave us Social Security and modern liberalism. What’s not to “not like”...:)


41 posted on 03/24/2013 8:36:06 AM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: the scotsman

Seeings as to how this is your thread, I really don’t want to hijack it, which I think I am doing. We can bring this up in another thread.

This was an excellent thread about the engineering miracle of the mulberries...


42 posted on 03/24/2013 8:38:29 AM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: rlmorel

What great memories and very well written! Thank you for your service.

I see you served on carriers. I actually started out as an AE but was sent TAD to the Seabees right out of “A” school and ended up cross rating. It’s hard to believe that this year I’ve been out for 40 years. The bad changes to this country started for real in the 60s. And it’s gotten worse each year.


43 posted on 03/24/2013 10:34:11 AM PDT by Terry Mross (This country will fail to exist in my lifetime. And I'm gettin' up there in age.)
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To: Terry Mross

We are in complete agreement. What we see now is what the radicals of the sixties had hoped-their kind, wearing suits as PART of “the Establishment” corroding it from within.

Heh, almost became an AE, eh? That is an interesting way you made that switch...:)


44 posted on 03/24/2013 10:42:45 AM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: zot

That’s a great story. There’s always someone who can figure it out. My old seabee buddy, with whom I’m still in contact, always says “Give the hardest job to your laziest worker and he’ll figure out the easiest way to do it.”

Here’s one of my favorites:

On 15 September 1950 U.S. troops landed at Inchon in what has come to be known as one of the most brilliant amphibious assaults in history. Seabees achieved renown as the men who made it possible. Battling enormous thirty-foot tides and a swift current while under continuous enemy fire, they positioned pontoon causeways within hours of the first beach assault. Following the landing, the incident known as the “Great Seabee Train Robbery” took place. The need to break the equipment bottleneck at the harbor inspired a group of Seabees to steal behind enemy lines and capture some abandoned locomotives. Despite enemy mortar fire, they brought the engines back intact and turned them over to the Army Transportation Corps.


45 posted on 03/24/2013 11:28:43 AM PDT by Terry Mross (This country will fail to exist in my lifetime. And I'm gettin' up there in age.)
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To: rlmorel

Actually I was an AE. I went to AE “A” school. After school I checked in at NAS Corpus Christi and two days later Hurricane Celia hit. The Seabees were sent in from Gulfport to help clean up and rebuild and about 15 of us were assigned to them TAD for what was supposed to be two weeks. Seventeen months later we were sent back to our squadrons. Three of us hated it so bad we requested to be cross-rated. Two were ADRs so it was easy for them. I had to work at it a little harder since I was in a critical rate. After requesting a Captain’s Mast the Skipper wrote a letter on my behalf and sent it to the Bureau of Naval Personel. I’m told I’m the only sailor to cross rate from a critical to non-critical rate. Whether true or not, I’m certainly glad I did it.

Here is what was starting to happen to the military in the 60s and 70s.

http://www.history.navy.mil/library/special/racial_incidents.htm


46 posted on 03/24/2013 12:13:08 PM PDT by Terry Mross (This country will fail to exist in my lifetime. And I'm gettin' up there in age.)
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To: Terry Mross
Thank goodness I never really encountered much of that stuff, I was in from 1975 to 1979, though I did get assaulted by a gang of black guys.

I set this apart, though, and here is why: I was in Cecil Field, walking back from the chow hall one night in between the barracks, and I felt a very sharp, hard kick in the ass. I whirled around to see a black guy grinning at me, and when I asked why he had kicked me, he said "I don't like your hat" (referring to my squadron hat for the VA-46 Clansmen)

I said, "That is too damn bad because you and I are going to have at it" and as I removed my glasses, four other black guys stepped around the corner. They encircled me as I stepped backwards, and not knowing what else to do, I assumed a martial arts pose hoping to buy a few seconds of time with their uncertainty. It worked as one of them said "Ah, he knows karate..." but that only lasted a few seconds until one lunged at me, I took a swing and down I went.

They were kicking the crap out of me, so I balled up and protected my face and vitals as best I could. They were trying to kick me in the nuts and the face, but fortunately for me, they smelled like they had been drinking, and landed more kicks on each other's legs and ankles than they did on me.

It seemed like it went on for five minutes, but I suppose it may have been only 15 or 30 seconds, at which point I saw an opening in their circle, bolted up and shot through it in one motion with all five of them running after me. I jumped on the concrete steps into the barracks, but knew if I grabbed the door to open it, they would be on me, so I grabbed a swab that was sitting in a bucket there and began jabbing and swinging it at them. I think I had been screaming "HELP!" over and over again at the top of my lungs throughout the entire time, but I don't really remember doing it.

They finally melted away, and I went across the street to the hangar and found my boss, who was on duty, AD1 Woods. When I told him what happened, he said: "Do you want to get together a bunch of our squadron mates and go find them?"

That was Woods. A good man. While I searched the face of every black guy I passed on that base for months, I simply could not remember the faces. But that simple willingness of Woods to take my side and stand with me against a bunch of black thugs kept me, I think from developing any long-term hatred of blacks because of it. He'll never know, but I hope to somehow meet him again and thank him in some way.

47 posted on 03/24/2013 3:34:12 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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To: rlmorel

I assume this is a picture of Woods.


48 posted on 03/24/2013 4:08:02 PM PDT by Terry Mross (This country will fail to exist in my lifetime. And I'm gettin' up there in age.)
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To: Terry Mross

Yes...a very good mechanic, and a good guy.


49 posted on 03/24/2013 7:35:19 PM PDT by rlmorel (1793 French Jacobins and 2012 American Liberals have a lot in common.)
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