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James Holmes' psychiatrist warned he may pose threat
LA Times ^ | April 4, 2013 | Jenny Deam

Posted on 04/05/2013 3:55:53 PM PDT by neverdem

Unsealed documents in the Colorado theater shooting case reveal that the suspect told his university psychiatrist a month before the attack that he was having homicidal thoughts.

CENTENNIAL, Colo. — About a month before the Aurora movie theater rampage left 12 dead and at least 70 injured in July, James E. Holmes told a psychiatrist he was having homicidal thoughts and she concluded he could pose a danger to the public, according to documents released Thursday...

--snip--

Along with chemicals used for explosives, rounds of ammunition, pistol cases and paper targets, police seized movie posters, video games, apartment lease papers, numerous computers, 48 containers of beer and other liquor and stacks of school textbooks. They found prescription medication for sertraline, a generic version of Zoloft used to treat depression, panic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder; and Clonazepam, usually prescribed to treat anxiety and panic attacks...

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Extended News; News/Current Events; US: Colorado
KEYWORDS: aurorashooting; banglist; colorado; guncontrol; jamesholmes; partisanmediashill; partisanmediashills; secondamendment; sertraline; zoloft

1 posted on 04/05/2013 3:55:53 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

The government knew he was dangerous 30 days in advance of his killing spree.

We need tougher laws to regulate the government.


2 posted on 04/05/2013 3:58:35 PM PDT by NoLibZone (I predict the exact same Freepers will hate the GOP Candidate for: 2016,2020,2024,2028, 2032.)
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To: neverdem

Not Bush’s fault...OBAMA’S fault!!!!!


3 posted on 04/05/2013 4:06:23 PM PDT by Don Corleone ("Oil the gun..eat the cannoli. Take it to the Mattress.")
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To: neverdem

http://blogs.findlaw.com/injured/2013/03/when-do-therapists-have-to-disclose-threats.html


4 posted on 04/05/2013 4:08:20 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau

Thanks for the link.


5 posted on 04/05/2013 4:12:05 PM PDT by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: All

One of my questions is what kind of whacky drugs was she feeding him. She was treating him for what...or was he another of her experiments? Who was paying for it??


6 posted on 04/05/2013 4:12:15 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: neverdem

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/07/28/details-emerge-on-psychiatrist-accused-colorado-massacre-gunman/


7 posted on 04/05/2013 4:14:06 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: neverdem

Gee, ya think?


8 posted on 04/05/2013 4:14:26 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Sacajaweau

Apparently nothing. I think the drugs were from another physician. Basically, no one did a thing. “Not my job.” Comes to mind.


9 posted on 04/05/2013 4:16:40 PM PDT by Smogger
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To: Smogger

Law enforcement is reactive. To get arrested before committing a crime is almost unheard of. There are special stalker statutes, but that’s the exception. Remember the movie The Minority Report? If I recall, that was about a police unit that arrested murderers before they committed murder. Do we want that? We do have something in Florida called The Baker Act. Any official can arrest you if they judge you are a threat to yourself or others. But then the state has to take care of you; which is expensive. So it’s not often used. You have to really be nutso to get Baker Acted. Incarceration usually lasts 2 weeks. Two weeks would not have deterred this assailant.

Even if the doctor had a signed “I’m-gonna-kill-you” note, chances are they would have done nothing.


10 posted on 04/05/2013 4:20:26 PM PDT by Gen.Blather
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To: Smogger

http://www.naturalnews.com/039796_James_Holmes_psychiatric_drugs_antidepressants.html


11 posted on 04/05/2013 4:20:41 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Smogger

http://www.denverpost.com/nationworld/ci_22960543/aurora-theater-shooting-documents-doctor-reported-james-holmes


12 posted on 04/05/2013 4:33:06 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Gen.Blather

Maybe not, but this isn’t the government peering into a crystal ball. This is a kid going to a mental health PROFESSIONAL and I emphasize that word saying that he is having delusions and homicidal thoughts. She should have asked him to have himself voluntarily committed right there on the spot, and if he didn’t agree set in motion a way to have him involuntarily committed. Geesh. What’s was James Holmes’alternative? Go home and flip through the yellow pages to try to find a hospital that would admit him? If he had gone into a campus clinic and said he needed to have an abortion they would have helped him right away and followed up I’m sure.


13 posted on 04/05/2013 4:35:22 PM PDT by Smogger
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To: neverdem

How does a “university psychiatrist” know if a college kid is crazy or not these days? It has to be a tough job.


14 posted on 04/05/2013 4:47:27 PM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Dude! Where's my Bill of Rights?)
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To: Gen.Blather
Definition of Class 5 Felony Menacing

Elements

In Colorado, menacing is defined as any person using a threat or physical action to knowingly place, or attempt to place, someone else in fear of imminent serious bodily injury. Menacing can be charged as either a Class 3 misdemeanor or a Class 5 felony depending on whether certain circumstances are present.

Felony Menacing

In addition to the act and intent required for menacing, Colorado law requires felony menacing include an added element. A person commits felony menacing when he uses a deadly weapon to commit the crime of menacing. For example, threatening to attack someone with your fists can result in a charge of misdemeanor menacing, but if you threaten to attack someone with a knife, you can be charged with a felony.

Deadly Weapon

The weapon or article need not be inherently deadly or able to cause death. The Colorado statute requires only that the item is used or presented in such a way as to cause a person to reasonably believe the weapon is deadly. For example, a person can commit felony menacing by use of a toy gun if the gun looks real enough to reasonably be confused with a real gun.

Threats

Colorado does not require a defendant to actually be in possession of a weapon. It is enough to threaten physical harm and intimate the possession of deadly weapon. So, threatening to stab someone with a knife you claim to have can be charged as felony menacing, even if no such knife exists.

Penalties

A Class 5 felony in Colorado brings with it the threat of fines and incarceration. The maximum sentence allowable is three years' incarceration in a state prison and up to $100,000 in fines. However, anyone convicted of such a crime must serve at least a year in prison and pay a minimum $1,000 fine.


15 posted on 04/05/2013 4:54:42 PM PDT by TigersEye (The irresponsible should not be leading the responsible.)
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To: neverdem
Apparently the psychiatrist saw Holmes only one time, and reported his homicidal thoughts to the campus police.

I wonder what else all the einsteins here think should have been done. Hint: it is not a crime to express general thoughts of violence against unknown or unnamed others.

16 posted on 04/05/2013 5:02:17 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: neverdem

Ya know, there’s a difference between whining to the campus beat cop and filing a formal complaint.

I’m pretty sure the shrink had a duty to fill out the paperwork.


17 posted on 04/05/2013 5:05:10 PM PDT by G Larry (Which of Obama's policies do you think I'd support if he were white?)
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To: hinckley buzzard
Fenton also told Lynn Whitten, a campus police officer, that after she stopped seeing Holmes he "threatened and harassed her via email/text messages," the documents said.

What about specific threats in writing? (see #15)

18 posted on 04/05/2013 5:06:28 PM PDT by TigersEye (The irresponsible should not be leading the responsible.)
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To: george76; dljordan; GraceG; dynachrome; unkus; loungitude; Washi; RandallFlagg; MileHi; G Larry; ...
Holmes was taking sertraline, a drug which is in a class that is problematic, to say the least. Some people appear to get violent with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). Some soon after they start the drug, or increase the dose or add another drug that increases serotonin in the blood. It's called serotonin syndrome. Others stopped it too quickly. They get what's called SSRI withdrawal syndrome or SSRI discontinuation syndrome.

SSRI Stories - Antidepressant Nightmares

A lot of primary care docs write scripts for these meds, but many are unaware of either serotonin syndrome or SSRI withdrawal syndrome.

19 posted on 04/05/2013 5:10:25 PM PDT by neverdem ( Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem

I’ve seen problems where people start, then stop, then start these types of meds over and over again on their own and that starting and stopping seems to trigger some sort of reaction. I have no study to prove this, just observed it in a certain line of work. An educated guess would be that starting and stopping psychotropic meds over and over again would make an unstable person even more unstable. You use to be able to force people to take their meds, now you can’t and there’s no monitoring. And there’s more mass shootings. And it has nothing to do with guns, but watered down mental health laws, IMHO. With monitoring, you could stop a med that didn’t work or made things worse, (not one med works for everyone) or make sure someone that benefits from SSRI’s or Antipsychotics take them regularly.


20 posted on 04/05/2013 5:45:32 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico
And added to my last post— people are sometimes given 3 months worth of these types of meds and sent on their way. (continuation of post #20)
21 posted on 04/05/2013 5:47:55 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: hinckley buzzard

First off, Einstein is capitalized and secondly, if you watched more movies you’d know that thoughtcrime is a felony!


22 posted on 04/07/2013 5:22:56 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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