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Rand Paul stumbles but doesn’t fall at Howard University
Washington Examiner ^ | 04/11/2013 | Charlie Spiering

Posted on 04/11/2013 7:46:57 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

Sen. Rand Paul R-Ky. delivered an effective speech at Howard University, even though he rhetorically stumbled at points.

The audience was mostly silent through Paul’s prepared speech, which highlighted traditional Republican policies such as school choice, free markets, and limited government.

Paul’s more libertarian ideas, however, appeared to resonate with the audience, as they applauded for his views on reduced jail penalties for non-violent drug users and a more humble foreign policy.

“Republicans are often miscast as uncaring or condemning of kids who make bad choices,” Paul said. “I, for one, plan to change that.”

Paul admitted that Republicans had failed to highlight the importance of their rich heritage of supporting civil rights, which was part of the reason he decided to give a speech.

Paul created a stir when he asked the students if they were aware that the NAACP was founded by Republicans – a line that the crowd apparently perceived as insulting.

The audience also laughed when Paul forgot the name of Edward Brooke when he tried to cite the black Massachusetts senator who was a graduate of Howard University.

Paul admitted that people told him he was either “brave or crazy” for speaking at a historically black college, especially after the controversial comments he made about the Civil Rights Act during an MSNBC interview with Rachel Maddow in 2010.

“Here I am a guy who once presumed to discuss a section of the Civil Rights Act,” Paul said, admitting that “it didn’t go so well.”

The audience, however, had this event in mind, as a student accused Paul during the Q-and-A session of believing in the federal government’s legal right to discriminate against individuals.

“I’ve never been against the Civil Rights Act,” Paul stated flatly in response. “Ever.”

After the audience was silent in response, the host of the event encouraged Paul to explain his position further, reminding him that “this was on tape.”

Paul responded that he was only concerned about certain portions of the Civil Rights Act that were beyond race.

His attempt to explain earned him a little bit of applause from the audience but it perhaps he should have been more prepared to address the topic.

Paul made an effective argument that Republicans weren’t targeting black voters by requesting a photo I.D. in order to vote – insisting that it was different from the Southern Democrat “literacy tests” of the 1850′s.

“I think that if you liken using a driver’s license to a literacy test, you demean the horror of what happened,” he stated.

During the Q-and-A session one student suggested there were two Republican parties, one of the party of Abraham Lincoln and civil rights – and the other the party of Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.

After the audience applauded the question, Paul argued that there wasn’t any difference between the two historical eras of Republicans, but that the party had failed to talk about it enough.

Judging by the audience’s response, Paul perhaps should have spent less time talking about Republicans and their role in civil rights movement to students who likely had the facts fresh in their mind from their history classes.

Instead, Paul probably should have done more to diffuse accusations of racism within the modern Republican party and asked the students themselves how the party was perceived.

At the end of the event, a student challenged Paul’s belief that government should just “leave us alone,” and suggested that he wanted a government that could help him go to college.

Paul’s response to the question relied heavily on the federal government’s budget and deficit numbers that perhaps sounded a bit cynical for a young man who saw government as his path to opportunity.

In the end, Paul’s humble demeanor and earnest approach probably saved him from any embarrassing boos or ridicule – such as Mitt Romney’s speech to the NAACP during the presidential campaign.

Paul deserves credit for reaching out, but his effort illustrated that more Republicans need to spend more time speaking and listening to the black community.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: blacks; damage; disaster; embarrassing; embarrassment; epicfail; fail; howarduniversity; libertarian; randpaul; randpaulspeech; stupidparty; unprepared

1 posted on 04/11/2013 7:46:57 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

MORE HERE:

RAND PAUL TO HOWARD UNIVERSITY: ‘Big Government Is Not A Friend To African Americans’

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/rand-paul-howard-black-voters-2013-4#ixzz2QANKfOcr


2 posted on 04/11/2013 7:47:37 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Here’s the take from a Hispanic writer:

http://www.policymic.com/articles/34141/rand-paul-howard-university-speech-he-didn-t-bomb-but-it-was-a-little-embarassing

Rand Paul Howard University Speech: He Didn’t Bomb, But it Was a Little Embarassing

EXCERPT:

A little embarrassing, but not a catastrophe. That seems to be the overall consensus rolling in from Senator Rand Paul’s (R-Ky.) speech at Howard University, a historically black university located in Washington D.C. Paul. He received a respectful but tough response from the audience, understandable given the Republican Party’s reputation among the African American community and Ran Paul’s own controversy regarding past remarks concerning race.

The Paul family has not had the best time when it comes to race. Rand’s father, Representative Ron Paul (R-Texas), himself has a history of statements that many saw as racially insensitive. Rand Paul himself stoked controversy regarding remarks about the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rand Paul’s speech at Howard University, however, represents an attempt to broaden the Republican electoral brand, even if the first step is a little embarrassing.

The speech itself focused on pre-1964 racial history. Paul gave several standard conservative talking points, reminding the audience that Abraham Lincoln was a Republican, Democrats passed Jim Crow laws, and that the founders of the NAACP were republicans. As reported by Talking Points Memo:

“’Would everyone know here they were all Republicans?’ he said at one point, referring to the NAACP’s founders.

‘Yes!’ came the booming response from nearly the entire audience, who appeared offended Paul would even raise the question.”

Still, Paul showed political astuteness in bringing up parts of his libertarian ideology that would resonate with the audience. His position that mandatory sentencing for drug crimes should be reduced was popular. When he claimed “I will do everything I can to keep nonviolent criminals out of jail,” Paul drew applause from the audience.

The response to Paul’s speech was mixed, with some appreciative of his remarks and other grateful that he had made an effort to come out. At one point two audience members interrupted Paul’s speech by holding up a sign that had written upon it “Howard University doesn’t support white supremacy” and were quickly escorted out by security. But this was the only major altercation, and for the most part, Paul was treated with respect.

CLICK ABOVE LINK FOR THE REST...


3 posted on 04/11/2013 7:49:13 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

“as they applauded for his views on reduced jail penalties for non-violent drug users and a more humble foreign policy.”

The Occupy crowd will be pleased.


4 posted on 04/11/2013 7:52:17 AM PDT by Rennes Templar (If guns kill people, how come no one dies at gun shows?)
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To: SeekAndFind

WATCH THIS SHORT VIDEO TO UNDERSTAND THE BLACK LIBERAL MINDSET AND WATCH RAND PAUL’s RESPONSE ( whether it sinks it or not remains to be seen ):

Rand Paul tries to reason with a Howard University moron who says “I want a government that is gonna help me”

http://www.mofopolitics.com/2013/04/10/rand-paul-tries-to-win-over-howard-university-student-who-says-i-want-a-government-that-is-gonna-help-me/

Explaining the “Leave Me Alone” governing philosophy to Melissa Harris-Perry’s ideological twin. A monumental task indeed…

“I want a government that is gonna help me. I want a government that is gonna help me fund my college education…”

Howard University, April 10.


5 posted on 04/11/2013 7:52:55 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: Rennes Templar

WATCH THIS SHORT VIDEO TO UNDERSTAND THE BLACK LIBERAL MINDSET AND WATCH RAND PAUL’s RESPONSE ( whether it sinks it or not remains to be seen ):

Rand Paul tries to reason with a Howard University moron who says “I want a government that is gonna help me”

http://www.mofopolitics.com/2013/04/10/rand-paul-tries-to-win-over-howard-university-student-who-says-i-want-a-government-that-is-gonna-help-me/

Explaining the “Leave Me Alone” governing philosophy to Melissa Harris-Perry’s ideological twin. A monumental task indeed…

“I want a government that is gonna help me. I want a government that is gonna help me fund my college education…”

Howard University, April 10.


6 posted on 04/11/2013 7:53:14 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: Rennes Templar

RAND OPAUL IN THE LION’s DEN.

Here is the full text of Paul’s prepared remarks:

I’d like to thank President Ribeau, the Howard University faculty, and students for having me today.

Some people have asked if I’m nervous about speaking at Howard. They say “You know, some of the students and faculty may be Democrats...”

My response is that my trip will be a success if the Hilltop will simply print that a Republican came to Howard but he came in peace.

My wife Kelley asked me last week do you ever have doubts about trying to advance a message for an entire country?

The truth is, sometimes. When I do have doubts, I think of a line from T.S. Eliot, “how should I presume to spit out all the butt ends of my days and ways, and how should I presume.”

And when I think of how political enemies often twist and distort my positions, I think again of Eliot’s words: “when I am pinned and wriggling on the wall, how should I presume?
And here I am today at Howard, a historically black college. Here I am, a guy who once presumed to discuss a section of the Civil Rights Act.

Some have said that I’m either brave or crazy to be here today. I’ve never been one to watch the world go by without participating. I wake up each day hoping to make a difference.

I take to heart the words of Toni Morrison of Howard University, who wrote: “If there is a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”

I can recite books that have been written, or I can plunge into the arena and stumble and maybe fall but at least I will have tried.

What I am about is a philosophy that leaves YOU — to fill in the blanks.

I come to Howard today, not to preach, or prescribe some special formula for you but to say I want a government that leaves you alone, that encourages you to write the book that becomes your unique future.

You are more important than any political party, more important than any partisan pleadings.

The most important thing you will do is yet to be seen. For me, I found my important thing to do when I learned to do surgery on the eye, when I learned to restore a person’s vision.

I found what was important when I met and married my wife.
Although I am an eye surgeon, first and foremost, I find myself as part of the debate over how to heal our sick economy and get people back to work.

I truly believe that we can have an economy that creates millions of jobs again but we will have to rethink our arguments and try to rise above empty partisan rhetoric.

My hope is that you will hear me out, that you will see me for who I am, not the caricature sometimes presented by political opponents.

If you hear me out, I believe you’ll discover that what motivates me more than any other issue is the defense of everyone’s rights.

Of strong importance to me is the defense of minority rights, not just racial minorities, but ideological and religious minorities.

If our government does not protect the rights of minorities, then democratic majorities could simply legislate away our freedoms.

The bill of rights and the civil war amendments protect us against the possibility of an oppressive federal or state government.

The fact that we are a Constitutional Republic means that certain inalienable rights are protected even from democratic majorities.

No Republican questions or disputes civil rights. I have never waivered in my support for civil rights or the civil rights act.

The dispute, if there is one, has always been about how much of the remedy should come under federal or state or private purview.

What gets lost is that the Republican Party has always been the party of civil rights and voting rights.

Because Republicans believe that the federal government is limited in its function-some have concluded that Republicans are somehow inherently insensitive to minority rights.
Nothing could be further from the truth.

Republicans do, indeed, still believe many rights remain with the people and states respectively.

When some people hear that, they tune us out and say: he’s just using code words for the state’s right to discriminate, for the state’s right to segregate and abuse.
But that’s simply not true.

Many Republicans do believe that decentralization of power is the best policy, that government is more efficient, more just, and more personal when it is smaller and more local.
But Republicans also realize that there are occasions of such egregious injustice that require federal involvement, and that is precisely what the 14th amendment and the Civil Rights Act were intended to do-protect citizens from state and local tyranny.

The fourteenth amendment says, “No state shall . . .” The fourteenth amendment did change the constitution to give a role for the federal government in protecting citizenship and voting regardless of race.

I did not live through segregation nor did I experience it first-hand. I did grow up in the South in public schools comprised of white, black, and Latino students largely all getting along with each other.

So, perhaps some will say that I can never understand. But I don’t think you had to be there to have been affected by our nation’s history of racial strife.

The tragedy of segregation and Jim Crow in the South is compounded when you realize that integration began in New England in the 1840’s and 1850’s.

In 1841, Frederick Douglas was pulled from the white car on the Eastern Railroad, clutching his seat so tightly that he was thrown from the train with its remnants still tightly in his hands .

But, within a few years public transportation was integrated in the northeast.

It is a stain on our history that integration didn’t occur until more than 100 years later in the South. That in the 1960’s we were still fighting to integrate public transportation and schools is and was an embarrassment.

The story of emancipation, voting rights and citizenship, from Fredrick Douglas until the modern civil rights era, is in fact the history of the Republican Party.
How did the party that elected the first black US Senator, the party that elected the first 20 African American Congressmen become a party that now loses 95% of the black vote?

How did the Republican Party, the party of the great Emancipator, lose the trust and faith of an entire race?
From the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement, for a century, most black Americans voted Republican. How did we lose that vote?

To understand how Republicans lost the African American vote, we must first understand how we won the African American vote.

In Kentucky, the history of black voting rights is inseparable from the Republican Party. Virtually all African Americans became Republicans.

Democrats in Louisville were led by Courier-Journal editor Henry Watterson and were implacably opposed to blacks voting.

Watterson wrote that his opposition to blacks voting was “founded upon a conviction that their habits of life and general condition disqualify them from the judicious exercise of suffrage.”

In George Wright’s “Life Behind the Veil,” he writes of Republican General John Palmer standing before tens of thousands of slaves on July 4th, 1865, when slavery still existed in Kentucky, and declaring:

“my countrymen, you are free, and while I command, the
military forces of the United States will defend your right to freedom.”

The crowd erupted in cheers.

Meanwhile, Kentucky’s Democrat-controlled legislature voted against the 13th, the 14th, and the 15th amendments.

William Warley was a black Republican in Louisville. He was born toward the end of the nineteenth century.

He was a founder of Louisville’s NAACP but he is most famous for fighting and overturning the notorious Louisville segregated housing ordinance.

Warley bought a house in the white section in defiance of a city segregation law. The case, Buchanan v. Warley, was finally decided in 1917 and the Supreme Court held unanimously that Kentucky law could not forbid the sale of a house based on race.

The Republican Party’s history is rich and chock full of emancipation and black history.

Republicans still prize the sense of justice that MLK spoke of when he said that “an unjust law is any law the majority enforces on a minority but does not make binding upon itself.”

Republicans have never stopped believing that minorities, whether they derive from the color of their skin or shade of their ideology should warrant equal protection.

Everyone knows of the sit-ins in Greensboro and Nashville but few people remember the sit-it in the Alexandria public library in 1938.

Samuel Tucker, a lawyer and graduate of Howard University, recruited five young African American men to go to the public library and select a book and sit and read until they were forcibly removed.

Tucker’s sit-in set the stage for students who organized the sit-in at Woolworth’s in Greensboro that brought down Jim Crow in many areas, years before the civil rights act of 1964.

I think our retelling of the civil rights era does not give enough credit to the heroism of civil disobedience.
You may say, oh that’s all well and good but that was a long time ago what have you done for me lately?

I think what happened during the Great Depression was that African Americans understood that Republicans championed citizenship and voting rights but they became impatient for economic emancipation.

African Americans languished below white Americans in every measure of economic success and the Depression was especially harsh for those at the lowest rung of poverty.
The Democrats promised equalizing outcomes through unlimited federal assistance while Republicans offered something that seemed less tangible-the promise of equalizing opportunity through free markets.

Now, Republicans face a daunting task. Several generations of black voters have never voted Republican and are not very open to even considering the option.

Democrats still promise unlimited federal assistance and Republicans promise free markets, low taxes, and less regulations that we believe will create more jobs.
The Democrat promise is tangible and puts food on the table, but too often doesn’t lead to jobs or meaningful success.
The Republican promise is for policies that create economic growth. Republicans believe lower taxes, less regulation, balanced budgets, a solvent Social Security and Medicare will stimulate economic growth.

Republicans point to the Reagan years when the economy grew at nearly 7% and millions upon millions of jobs were created.

Today, after four years of the current policies, one in six Americans live in poverty, more than at any other time in the past several decades.

In fact, the poor have grown poorer in the past four years. Black unemployment is at 14%, nearly twice the national average. This is unacceptable.

Using taxes to punish the rich, in reality, punishes everyone because we are all interconnected. High taxes and excessive regulation and massive debt are not working.
The economy has been growing at less than 1% and actually contracted in the fourth quarter.

I would argue that the objective evidence shows that big government is not a friend to African Americans.
Big government relies on the Federal Reserve, our central bank, to print money out of thin air. Printing money out of thin air leads to higher prices.

When the price of gas rises to $4 per gallon, it is a direct result of our nation’s debt. When food prices rise, it is a direct result of the $50,000 we borrow each second. Inflation hurts everyone, particularly the poor.

If you are struggling to get ahead, if you have school loans and personal debt, you should choose a political party that wants to leave more money in the private sector so you will get a job when the time comes.

Some Republicans, let’s call them the moss-covered variety, mistake war for defense. They forget that Reagan argued for Peace through strength, not War through strength.<
The old guard argues for arms for Ghaddafi and then the following year for boots on the ground to defeat Ghaddafi.

I want you to know that all Republicans do not clamor for war, that many Republicans believe in a strong national defense that serves to preserve the Peace.

In Louisville, in the predominantly African American west end of town, it was recently announced that 18 schools are failing. The graduation rate is 40%.

The head of Kentucky’s education called it academic genocide. Johns Hopkins researchers call these schools dropout factories.

I defy anyone to watch Waiting for Superman and honestly argue against school choice.

A minister friend of mine in the West End calls school choice the civil rights issue of the day. He’s absolutely right.

By the sixth grade, Ronald Holasie was failing most of his classes, but through school choice he was able to attend a Catholic school in the DC area.

There he learned that he had a natural gift for composing music, but before that, his reading level was so low that he had struggled to write lyrics. Ronald then went on to matriculate at Barry University.

There are countless examples of the benefits of school choice - where kids who couldn’t even read have turned their lives completely around.

Maybe it’s about time we all reassess blind allegiance to ideas that are failing our children.

Every child in every neighborhood, of every color, class and background, deserves a school that will help them succeed.
Those of you assembled today are American success stories. You will make it and do great things.

In every neighborhood, white, black or brown, there are kids who are not succeeding because they messed up.

They had kids before they were married, or before they were old enough to support them, or they got hooked on drugs, or they simply left school.

Republicans are often miscast as uncaring or condemning of kids who make bad choices. I, for one, plan to change that.
I am working with Democratic senators to make sure that kids who make bad decisions such as non-violent possession of drugs are not imprisoned for lengthy sentences.

I am working to make sure that first time offenders are put into counseling and not imprisoned with hardened criminals.
We should not take away anyone’s future over one mistake.
Let me tell you the tale of two young men. Both of them made mistakes. Both of them were said to have used illegal drugs.

One of them was white and from a privileged background. He had important friends, and an important father and an important grandfather. You know, the kind of family who university’s name dorms after.

The family had more money than they could count. Drugs or no drugs, his family could buy justice if he needed it.
The other man also used illegal drugs, but he was of mixed race and from a single parent household, with little money. He didn’t have important friends or a wealthy father.

Now, you might think I’m about to tell you a story about
racism in America, where the rich white kid gets off and the black kid goes to jail

It could well be, and often is, but that is not this story. In this story, both young men were extraordinarily lucky. Both young men were not caught. They weren’t imprisoned.

Instead, they both went on to become Presidents of the United States.

Barack Obama and George Bush were lucky. The law could have put both of them away for their entire young adulthood. Neither one would have been employable, much less president.
Some argue with evidence that our drug laws are biased-that they are the new Jim Crow.

But to simply be against them for that reason misses a larger point. They are unfair to EVERYONE, largely because of the one size fits all federal mandatory sentences.
Our federal mandatory minimum sentences are simply heavy handed and arbitrary. They can affect anyone at any time, though they disproportionately affect those without the means to fight them.

We should stand and loudly proclaim enough is enough. We should not have laws that ruin the lives of young men and women who have committed no violence.

That’s why I have introduced a bill to repeal federal mandatory minimum sentences. We should not have drug laws or a court system that disproportionately punishes the black community.

The history of African-American repression in this country rose from government-sanctioned racism.
Jim Crow laws were a product of bigoted state and local governments.

Big and oppressive government has long been the enemy of freedom, something black Americans know all too well.
We must always embrace individual liberty and enforce the constitutional rights of all Americans-rich and poor, immigrant and native, black and white.

Such freedom is essential in achieving any longstanding health and prosperity.
As Toni Morrison said, write your own story. Challenge mainstream thought.

I hope that some of you will be open to the Republican message that favors choice in education, a less aggressive foreign policy, more compassion regarding non-violent crime and encourages opportunity in employment.

And when the time is right, I hope that African Americans will again look to the party of emancipation, civil liberty, and individual freedom.


7 posted on 04/11/2013 7:58:06 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Did he mention education spending, food stamps, medicare and SS, affirmative action, HUD, all that stuff they love?

That is when reality sets in.

Obviously he is targeting some other voters by talking to them....asians?


8 posted on 04/11/2013 7:58:12 AM PDT by sickoflibs (To GOP : Any path to US citizenship IS putting them ahead in line. Stop lying about your position.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Q and A Session at Howard University

Howard University student to Sen. Rand Paul: “Good afternoon, Senator. My name is Keenan Glover, I’m an administration of justice major from Rochester, New York. A freshman, as well. You say you want to provide a government that leaves us alone. Quite frankly, I don’t want that. I want a government that is going to help me. I want a government that is going to help me fund my college education. I want a government that won’t define me by my FAFSA or by my family’s income. I’m a dollar sign with a heartbeat in this nation. This society is a mirror image of Capitol Hill. Do you, Senator Rand Paul, have a solution to come up with new American values so that the citizens of this nation have a worth of more than dead presidents and Ben Franklin?”

CLICK HERE TO WATCH RAND PAUL’s RESPONSE TO THE QUESTION:

http://realclearpolitics.com/video/2013/04/10/howard_student_to_rand_paul_i_want_a_government_that_is_going_to_help_me.html


9 posted on 04/11/2013 7:59:22 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: sickoflibs

Q and A Session at Howard University

Howard University student to Sen. Rand Paul: “Good afternoon, Senator. My name is Keenan Glover, I’m an administration of justice major from Rochester, New York. A freshman, as well. You say you want to provide a government that leaves us alone. Quite frankly, I don’t want that. I want a government that is going to help me. I want a government that is going to help me fund my college education. I want a government that won’t define me by my FAFSA or by my family’s income. I’m a dollar sign with a heartbeat in this nation. This society is a mirror image of Capitol Hill. Do you, Senator Rand Paul, have a solution to come up with new American values so that the citizens of this nation have a worth of more than dead presidents and Ben Franklin?”

CLICK HERE TO WATCH RAND PAUL’s RESPONSE TO THE QUESTION:

http://realclearpolitics.com/video/2013/04/10/howard_student_to_rand_paul_i_want_a_government_that_is_going_to_help_me.html


10 posted on 04/11/2013 7:59:42 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind
Paul probably should have done more to diffuse accusations of racism within the modern Republican party
Why? WTH does he, or any Republican, have to deny or even reply to "accusations? Make the accusers prove it or STFU.
I surfed onto a CNN panel of "experts" racists this morning, and they made it sound like Paul whipped out a burning cross.
11 posted on 04/11/2013 8:03:09 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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Honestly, I think he is wasting his time. The black culture in our nation is so utterly depraved and corrupt that efforts like this are akin to Charlie Brown kicking the football. There are some very intelligent, thoughtful and rational African-Americans in this nation who understand the values of conservatism, but the umbrella over it all casts a dark shadow of dysfunction and perversion of values.


12 posted on 04/11/2013 8:03:23 AM PDT by Arkansas Toothpick
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To: Arkansas Toothpick

“It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness” — Edmund Burke


13 posted on 04/11/2013 8:07:50 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

mark and Bttt


14 posted on 04/11/2013 8:09:01 AM PDT by higgmeister ( In the Shadow of The Big Chicken!)
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To: SeekAndFind
I applaud Paul for trying. The libertarian message of reining in the excesses of the War on Drugs is probably the only thing that can invoke even a glimmer of sympathy from his audience. Nothing else he said has any chance of resonating.

The black education/civil rights establishment has created an elaborate alternate reality with just enough cherry-picked historical facts to make it seem true to black students and MSNBC hosts. That isn't going to be overthrown by weakly presenting an alternate set of facts and trying to seem nice and non-threatening. Rage against historical injustice is too convenient an outlet for frustrations over personal failure. There is little chance the black political establishment will voluntarily let go of it.

As a practical - if somewhat cynical - alternative, Republicans would get more votes if they spoke to Hispanic community groups instead and rather than wasting time on immigration issues promising to crack down hard on the epidemic of urban black-on-Hispanic crime.

15 posted on 04/11/2013 8:23:43 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves (CTRL-GALT-DELETE)
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To: SeekAndFind
Looks like Rand tried to brush over those programs in his speech.

As a response to the question hes says “We dont have to agree on every issue...I want a government that leaves you alone...that doesnt mean no government..

Trying to create this picture for them: ‘WOW, leave me alone?? I love that idea, I still get all those freebees and Rand will stop the POLL-ICE from their stop and search missions though my neigborhood? I can smoke weed without getting hassaled?”

My point is that to be serious Rand needs to at least try to convince them his real positions are good for them.

I still remember the Jack Kemp disaster.

16 posted on 04/11/2013 8:24:19 AM PDT by sickoflibs (To GOP : Any path to US citizenship IS putting them ahead in line. Stop lying about your position.)
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To: SeekAndFind
“I’ve never been against the Civil Rights Act,” Paul stated flatly in response. “Ever.”

I appreciated his filibuster, because it changed the game. But this is the speech of an unprincipled suck-up who also manages to shoot himself in the foot. Making nice on behalf of illegal drugs in front of people basically destroyed by them. Not addressing moral issues, where most would have agreed with him—except, maybe he's not so big on those issues after all.

And as far as the so-called Civil Rights Act is concerned, local malfeasance and corruption can't be cured by Federal malfeasance and corruption. Don't have the brass to say that either? What is it you do, Rand?

17 posted on 04/11/2013 8:26:26 AM PDT by SamuraiScot
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To: SeekAndFind
Judging by the audience’s response, Paul perhaps should have spent less time talking about Republicans and their role in civil rights movement to students who likely had the facts fresh in their mind from their history classes.

"Facts" my arse.

18 posted on 04/11/2013 8:29:55 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: skeeter

Rand Paul is a socially liberal and fiscally conservative isolationist like his old man. He will never be taken seriously because of his whacky libertarian (if it feels good do it, just leave us alone), mentality.


19 posted on 04/11/2013 8:50:52 AM PDT by NKP_Vet ("The only glory in war is surviving")
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To: Rennes Templar
We, as a society, would be much better off if we took a more liberal, (NOTE SMALL L)approach to drugs and drug abuse.

The fact is that our police force, through the ‘War on Drugs’ has become a standing army of automatic rifle toting thugs. They have infringed on the rights of ordinary Americans to simply be left alone.

They burst in unannounced breaking private property and terrorizing citizens, often completely innocent citizens, exercising often spurious search warrants.

Our prisons and court system are clogged with drug abusers who haven't done anything violent. This leaves violent criminals able to run wild. Imagine how much cheaper it would be to require treatment on demand as apposed to the tens of thousands a year that it costs per inmate to house and feed the hundreds of thousands of nonviolent drug offenders every year.

In a country that has found an invisible right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution in order to allow women the ability to kill their unborn children because it is her body and she can do what she wants to that body. I find it difficult to believe that a person would not have the right to destroy ones body, or in the case of steroids, improve certain aspects of their body without the Federal Government getting involved.

20 posted on 04/11/2013 9:29:52 AM PDT by Jim from C-Town (The government is rarely benevolent, often malevolent and never benign!)
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To: Jim from C-Town

The issue is non-violent crime. Someone using weed in their own home is one thing. Someone trafficking in it or other drugs is contributing to the violent drug culture. Most drug- related prisoners are in for trafficking, and this is why crime and drug crime in particular is down from 30 years ago. To lump in drug dealers with occasional users for reduced sentences because they are “non-violent” is a big mistake, and this is where it could lead.


21 posted on 04/11/2013 9:46:34 AM PDT by Rennes Templar (If guns kill people, how come no one dies at gun shows?)
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To: Rennes Templar
“as they applauded for his views on reduced jail penalties for non-violent drug users and a more humble foreign policy.”

The Occupy crowd will be pleased.


As will anyone who prefers a smaller government.
22 posted on 04/11/2013 11:08:59 AM PDT by highball ("I never should have switched from scotch to martinis." -- the last words of Humphrey Bogart)
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To: SeekAndFind
“I want a government that is gonna help me. I want a government that is gonna help me fund my college education…”

And it does for this young man. It guarantees college loans. What more is needed?

23 posted on 04/11/2013 11:32:18 AM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: NKP_Vet

RE: Rand Paul is a socially liberal and fiscally conservative isolationist like his old man.

Well, on gay marriage, he wants government TOTALLY OFF the business of recognizing marriages altogether. How this is done in practice remains to be seen.


24 posted on 04/11/2013 11:39:10 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: sickoflibs
He said

"The Democrats promised equalizing outcomes through unlimited federal assistance while Republicans offered something that seemed less tangible-the promise of equalizing opportunity through free markets."

And Howard is a black college, so they were his target.

Howard is a very reputable school academically. But, there has been 2 or 3 generations of government indoctrinated dependents who have gone through those hallowed halls. It will take time and effort to turn this around. I think the impending SHTF government crash / crisis will wake some up...

25 posted on 04/11/2013 11:54:51 AM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: NKP_Vet
"Rand Paul is a socially liberal and fiscally conservative isolationist like his old man."

still trotting out the lies...

Rand Paul on the issues

- My opponents call me libertarian but I'm pro-life. (Feb 2011)
- Life begins at conception. (Jul 2010)
- Opposes federal abortion funding. (Aug 2010)
- Prohibit federal funding for abortion. (May 2011)
- Opposes same-sex marriage. (Nov 2009)
- Opposes affirmative action. (Aug 2010)
- Supports Amendment to prevent same sex marriage. (Aug 2010)

26 posted on 04/11/2013 12:01:17 PM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: SeekAndFind
LOL!!! There's a poll on the right sidebar to vote for POTUS nominations. The wording is hilarious!
27 posted on 04/11/2013 12:11:02 PM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: uncommonsense

I could care less what Rand Paul said his views were before the became a US senator. Only two of the positions you listed were after Jan 2011, when he became a member of Congress. His old man voted for sodomy to be allowed in the US Armed Forces. His old man said during the debates that anyone should have the right to “get married”. His old man said there was nothing wrong with Iran getting nuke. Rand Paul worked on Ron Paul’s campaign and supported him for US president. If you don’t agree with someone’s positions, you don’t support them for president, unless you are a hypocrite. And like his code pink father he is an isolationist and has never seen a drug he didn’t want legalize. Like his old man, Rand Paul ran for Congress as a republican because libertarians don’t stand a snowball’s chance in hell of getting elected to public office. End of story.


28 posted on 04/11/2013 2:18:16 PM PDT by NKP_Vet ("The only glory in war is surviving")
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To: NKP_Vet
"I could care less what Rand Paul said his views were before the became a US senator. Only two of the positions you listed were after Jan 2011"

Keep avoiding the challenge - Rand's actual positions in statement or deed (NOT his dad's).

Rand Paul said explicitly when stumping for his father that he was NOT his father. Couldn't have been more clear, but you don't care about facts. Are you exactly the same as your father? I sure as heck don't want to be tarred with the same brush as my father, but in similar circumstances, I'd do exactly what Rand did - it's his frikin' dad for crying out loud!

Rand Paul stated his positions and all you can trot out is "his father".... Nothing else. I give up.

29 posted on 04/11/2013 2:38:16 PM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: NKP_Vet
"Rand Paul worked on Ron Paul’s campaign and supported him for US president. If you don’t agree with someone’s positions, you don’t support them for president, unless you are a hypocrite."

Who did you support? Did you agree with everything they said? Are you a hypocrite?

30 posted on 04/11/2013 2:41:16 PM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: SeekAndFind

Dang, Rand Paul might have lost the black vote for 2016. HAHAHAHAHAHA.


31 posted on 04/11/2013 7:46:19 PM PDT by cdcdawg
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To: cdcdawg

A flying donkey has a better chance at getting the GOP nomination than Code Pink Rand Paul.


32 posted on 04/11/2013 8:20:52 PM PDT by NKP_Vet ("The only glory in war is surviving")
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To: NKP_Vet

That same flying donkey has a better chance of getting more than 5% of the black vote than Rand Paul or any other potential GOP nominee. Waste of time.


33 posted on 04/12/2013 7:37:28 AM PDT by cdcdawg
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Rand Paul calls on conservatives to embrace immigration reform
LATimes.com | March 19, 2013 | Michael A. Memoli
Posted on 04/21/2013 1:52:42 PM PDT by SoConPubbie
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/3010596/posts


34 posted on 04/21/2013 8:22:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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