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New “Micro-Batteries” Show Great Potential, Now The Most Powerful Batteries On The Planet
Clean Technica ^ | April 17, 2013 | "Nathan"

Posted on 04/18/2013 1:22:55 PM PDT by Wonder Warthog

Newly created “micro-batteries” that are only a few millimeters in size are now the most powerful batteries in the world. The new batteries, created by researchers at the University of Illinois, greatly out-power “even the best supercapacitors,” while being only a fraction of their size.

“The graphic illustrates a high power battery technology from the University of Illinois. Ions flow between three-dimensional micro-electrodes in a lithium ion battery.”

“They pack such a punch that a driver could use a cellphone powered by these batteries to jump-start a dead car battery – and then recharge the phone in the blink of an eye,” a University of Illinois press release put out yesterday noted.

Sounds like a potentially significant technological improvement. Such batteries could certainly have a use in electric vehicles, and as a means of renewable energy storage, if they can be produced cheaply enough.

“This is a whole new way to think about batteries,” said William P. King, University of Illinois professor of mechanical science and engineering. “A battery can deliver far more power than anybody ever thought. In recent decades, electronics have gotten small. The thinking parts of computers have gotten small. And the battery has lagged far behind. This is a microtechnology that could change all of that. Now the power source is as high-performance as the rest of it.”

What makes this new technology sound interesting though isn’t simply the increased power, it’s the potential for simultaneously possessing high power transmission and high energy storage. As of now, there’s a trade-off forced by technological limitations — it’s either one or the other, not both.

“There’s a sacrifice,” said James Pikul. “If you want high energy you can’t get high power; if you want high power it’s very difficult to get high energy. But for very interesting applications, especially modern applications, you really need both. That’s what our batteries are starting to do. We’re really pushing into an area in the energy storage design space that is not currently available with technologies today.”

Some of the potential uses are certainly interesting: electronic devices as much as 30 times smaller, credit-card-thin cell phones that can recharge in a second, high-power lasers, portable high-power medical devices, etc.

What makes these batteries so much better than others? How did the researchers do it? I’ll let the University explain:

“The batteries owe their high performance to their internal three-dimensional microstructure. Batteries have two key components: the anode (minus side) and cathode (plus side). Building on a novel fast-charging cathode design by materials science and engineering professor Paul Braun’s group, King and Pikul developed a matching anode and then developed a new way to integrate the two components at the microscale to make a complete battery with superior performance.”

The researchers indicate that the batteries are indeed rechargeable and that they can charge approximately 1,000 times faster than competing technologies. That’s no incremental improvement, but we’ll see if they can bring the technology to market.

The researchers are currently working on developing a low-cost manufacturing paradigm for the technology.

The new technology is outlined in the April 16 issue of Nature Communications.


TOPICS: Technical
KEYWORDS: baatteries; powerstorage

1 posted on 04/18/2013 1:22:55 PM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: Wonder Warthog; a fool in paradise

The Incredible Revolutionary Amazing Discovery of the Month! (To be not heard from ever again!)


2 posted on 04/18/2013 1:25:06 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: Wonder Warthog; a fool in paradise

The Incredible Revolutionary Amazing Discovery of the Month! (To be not heard from ever again!)


3 posted on 04/18/2013 1:25:14 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: Wonder Warthog; rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; ...

4 posted on 04/18/2013 1:25:27 PM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: Wonder Warthog
Related: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3009407/posts
5 posted on 04/18/2013 1:27:13 PM PDT by Yo-Yo
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To: Wonder Warthog

As a technical person, I am skeptical of a battery only a few millimeters in size which can jump start a car. And if a tiny battery can put out 600+ amps, I don’t want it in my pocket. What is it, antimatter?


6 posted on 04/18/2013 1:28:29 PM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: ShadowAce; Wonder Warthog

Very interesting article.

Please add me to your ping list Ace.


7 posted on 04/18/2013 1:29:43 PM PDT by LuvFreeRepublic
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To: Wonder Warthog
Wonder what the initial cost would be for these batteries ?
Another question ? when new inventions or products come to the market and the cost is way over the heads of adverage people , is the curve when the price comes down to more earth like levels where everyone can afford it getting smaller ?
What I mean is ? the amount of time to wait to where most people can afford it, as in ? decades ago ? we would have to wait 2 years ? 5 years ? 10 years when the prices would be more reasonable.
8 posted on 04/18/2013 1:31:20 PM PDT by American Constitutionalist
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To: Wonder Warthog

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v4/n4/full/ncomms2747.html

Abstract and, for a fee, the paper ($32 for a PDF!). But someone in the field might think it worth that price.

Seems to me nanorobots would be the ticket for making high-surface area batteries.


9 posted on 04/18/2013 1:34:12 PM PDT by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: LuvFreeRepublic

You’ve been added.


10 posted on 04/18/2013 1:36:25 PM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: Wonder Warthog
and they'll blow your head clean off?

Love, Clint.

11 posted on 04/18/2013 1:38:46 PM PDT by NonValueAdded
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To: Wonder Warthog

I want some answers::

what is the energy density of these batteries:: Currently, we are doing well indeed to get over 300WH/LB of density. There have been some 500WH/LB tests, but nothing on the market.

To get to 1000 times this...you are ow talking 50KW/LB.!! This is WAY more than GASOLINE!!

This would allow a battery of 4 POUNDS to have 200KW/H of power!!

Don’t forget some of the high-density formulas out there are ALREADY seeing “catastrophic energy release” of their energy, as fires and/or explosions. This is on UNDER 300WH/LB batteries!! Imagine a battery with say 300 KILOWATT hours of energy, “going up” on someones car!!

Converted into a few milliseconds of power—that is MEGAJOULES of explosive power!! Think of an IED!!

and to recharge all of this in “seconds” would require a LOT of power in—power produces heat. heat can be dangerous...

I love new technology, but the thermodynamic laws are hard to beat.


12 posted on 04/18/2013 1:39:18 PM PDT by Rca2000
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To: Sender
As a technical person, I am skeptical of a battery only a few millimeters in size which can jump start a car. And if a tiny battery can put out 600+ amps, I don’t want it in my pocket. What is it, antimatter?

BTTT

13 posted on 04/18/2013 1:41:49 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: mrsmith

All-Solid-State Lithium-Ion Microbatteries: A Review of
Various Three-Dimensional Concepts
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aenm.201000002/pdf
Free but not the same paper, just more info


14 posted on 04/18/2013 1:44:32 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Sender

I’m going to guess that they intend to stick a large array of these batteries into a larger battery case.


15 posted on 04/18/2013 1:45:45 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: Rca2000

“To get to 1000 times this...you are ow talking 50KW/LB.!!”

Finally I will able to install Phaser banks on my Jeep.


16 posted on 04/18/2013 1:48:02 PM PDT by Brooklyn Attitude (Obama being re-elected is the political equivalent of OJ being found not guilty.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

If (!) true, this is insane. I want a laser gun :)

This does raise serious concerns though. Being able to carry that much power around, game changer in many contexts.


17 posted on 04/18/2013 1:48:16 PM PDT by fuzzylogic (welfare state = sharing consequences of poor moral choices among everybody)
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To: Sender
The key word in this is 'could jump start' - which in reality isn't possible. Yes the battery can be charged with a potential 600 amps, but there is no way to 'get at it' if it's built into a cell-phone. You'll get very long battery life, perhaps not having to charge the thing up but perhaps once a month.

On the other hand, the same type of battery built into an appropriate housing with the needed larger conductors, and clamps to hook the thing to your battery would perhaps get the job done. But, even then, crank-time is likely to be very short, therefore not being what it needs to be when you're dealing with a hard-starting vehicle.

Bottom line - it's more hype than reality.

18 posted on 04/18/2013 1:48:48 PM PDT by Ron C.
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To: Sender
God help you if you`re carrying it in your front pants pocket and it shorts, you may be singing soprano after that one!
19 posted on 04/18/2013 1:51:28 PM PDT by nomad
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To: Wonder Warthog

“The batteries owe their high performance to their internal three-dimensional microstructure. Batteries have two key components: the anode (minus side) and cathode (plus side). Building on a novel fast-charging cathode design by materials science and engineering professor Paul Braun’s group, King and Pikul developed a matching anode and then developed a new way to integrate the two components at the microscale to make a complete battery with superior performance.”

That’s nice, but they haven’t told how they work. I’m leaning toward thinking they’re an array of capacitors.

Of course there’s a plus and a minus. But how is the charge stored!


20 posted on 04/18/2013 1:51:51 PM PDT by I want the USA back (Pi$$ed off yet?)
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To: Rca2000

These huge advances stem from a brand new cathode and anode structure, pioneered by the University of Illinois researchers. In essence, a standard li-ion battery normally has a solid, two-dimensional anode made of graphite and a cathode made of a lithium salt. The new Illinois battery, on the other hand, has a porous, three-dimensional anode and cathode. To create this new electrode structure, the researchers build up a structure of polystyrene (Styrofoam) on a glass substrate, electrodeposit nickel onto the polystyrene, and then electrodeposit nickel-tin onto the anode and manganese dioxide onto the cathode. The diagram above does a good job of explaining the process.

The end result is that these porous electrodes have a massive surface area, allowing for more chemical reactions to take place in a given space, ultimately providing a massive boost to discharge speed (power output) and charging. So far, the researchers have used this tech to create a button-sized microbattery, and you can see in the graph below how well their battery compares to a conventional Sony CR1620 button cell. The energy density is slightly lower, but the power density is 2,000 times greater. On the opposite end of the bleeding-edge spectrum — increased energy density, but lower power density — then IBM’s lithium-air battery currently leads the pack.


Energy density vs. power density for a variety of battery technologies, including University of Illinois’ new microstructured anode/cathode li-ion battery

More at:
New lithium-ion battery design that’s 2,000 times more powerful, recharges 1,000 times faster
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/153614-new-lithium-ion-battery-design-thats-2000-times-more-powerful-recharges-1000-times-faster

21 posted on 04/18/2013 1:52:05 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Sender
Re: “I don’t want it in my pocket.”

Micro-batteries.....

The new Viagra!

22 posted on 04/18/2013 1:56:34 PM PDT by zeestephen
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To: Wonder Warthog

Ahhhhhhh. This could probably power a shoulder fired rail gun. Remember I thought of it so I’m first in line!


23 posted on 04/18/2013 1:57:32 PM PDT by 762X51
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To: Wonder Warthog; neverdem; sickoflibs
“They pack such a punch that a driver could use a cellphone powered by these batteries to jump-start a dead car battery – and then recharge the phone in the blink of an eye,” a University of Illinois press release put out yesterday noted.

Ping

24 posted on 04/18/2013 1:58:11 PM PDT by GOPJ (The screed of so-called journalists: 'If it doesn't fit, you must omit.' - - freeper Vigilanteman)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Actually the anode is the plus side and the cathode is the minus side. I caught that error and it makes me even more skeptical until proven.


25 posted on 04/18/2013 1:59:01 PM PDT by Nowhere Man (Whitey, I miss you so much. Take care, pretty girl. (4-15-2001 - 10-12-2012))
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To: thackney

Help me out with the vocabulary.

What’s the difference between “energy density” and “power density?”

Or, more simply, what’s the difference between “energy” and “power?”


26 posted on 04/18/2013 2:02:08 PM PDT by zeestephen
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To: Rca2000

27 posted on 04/18/2013 2:06:29 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: zeestephen

Energy is the capacity to do work, power is the rate at which the work can be done.


28 posted on 04/18/2013 2:08:10 PM PDT by Boogieman
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To: zeestephen

Energy is energy

Power is power

;-)

If you were talking about a car, energy is the size of the fuel tank, power is the size of the engine.

Energy is power multiplied by time.

The same amount of energy can be a little power for a long time, or a lot of power for a little time.


29 posted on 04/18/2013 2:08:46 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Sender

600 amps is easy, they don’t say how microseconds it will provide that amperage. A big capacitor can do it for a fraction of a second.

Of course, That little battery would require some really big terminals to keep from vaporizing.


30 posted on 04/18/2013 2:12:54 PM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Rca2000

What is W/H? Sorry, technically challenged.


31 posted on 04/18/2013 2:22:01 PM PDT by squarebarb ( Fairy tales are basically true.)
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To: squarebarb

Watts per Hour


32 posted on 04/18/2013 2:27:07 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Once the battery is installed in your cell phone you’ll never have to recharge the phone again.The phone will probably burst into flames like certain notebook pc’s have recently.


33 posted on 04/18/2013 2:29:07 PM PDT by puppypusher (The World is going to the dogs.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Bump for later


34 posted on 04/18/2013 2:31:30 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Obama is the Chicken Little of politics)
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To: Revolting cat!
"The Incredible Revolutionary Amazing Discovery of the Month! (To be not heard from ever again!)"

LOL! I hear ya... I love to read about "over the horizon" tech. But, I made a similar comment about a prominent N.E. company famous for making headline-grabbing announcements about "breakthrough" technology, only to say in the fine print that it won't be commercially available for the next 10 - 20 years. I won't mention their name since the FR attack dogs will come out in mass and I'm already inundated from proponents of statism.

Conversely, Apple likes to keep new tech close to the vest and only reveals it when the product in in the pipeline...

35 posted on 04/18/2013 2:51:43 PM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: American Constitutionalist
These days, the price usually tanks after 1 or 2 years with global competition and production scaling up. The high end market (medical, military) usually adopts first, then production ramps up and prices fall. Think of new iPhones - price drops after 6 months and Apple doesn't have much perceived equivalents.
36 posted on 04/18/2013 2:57:04 PM PDT by uncommonsense (more laws = more government = more coercive power = more crimes of consequence)
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To: Sender
I am skeptical

As am I.

I think we will find a misunderstanding of how the battery functions or a misstatement, which is more likely. The point may have been that if enough of these were stacked they could start an internal combustion engine.

Battery, microphone, and speaker technology has grown by leaps and bounds over the last decade but this would be an amazing leap.

37 posted on 04/18/2013 3:02:19 PM PDT by MosesKnows
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To: Wonder Warthog

Instead of bigger batteries, a metric crap-ton of smaller batteries that take no time to recharge, but with a large quantity of them, a long time to discharge. Interesting thought!

/didn’t read story yet, just my thoughts


38 posted on 04/18/2013 4:38:39 PM PDT by ro_dreaming (G.K. Chesterton, “Christianity has not been tried and found wanting. It’s been found hard and lef)
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To: Sender
What is it, antimatter?

Well, they have been trying to reverse engineer it since Roswell, 1947.

They may have finally succeeded.

39 posted on 04/18/2013 5:04:11 PM PDT by hattend (Firearms and ammunition...the only growing industries under the Obama regime.)
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To: Rca2000

“the thermodynamic laws are hard to beat”

Yet in every generation of man there’s a sucker who tries.


40 posted on 04/18/2013 6:50:04 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: Sender
As a technical person, I am skeptical of a battery only a few millimeters in size which can jump start a car. And if a tiny battery can put out 600+ amps, I don’t want it in my pocket. What is it, antimatter?

And where on your phone do you hook the 4AWG wires? Or does this technology render 26AWG conductors capable of carrying enough current to start your car?

I used to work in an industry where there was a lot of large gauge extremely flexible cable, perfect for homemade jumper cables. So people would steal enough to make themselves a set, and the boss (not owner, just department boss) did the same. So he calls the engineer one night cause his car won't start and yes, he's even tried using the super-duper stolen jumpers with no effect. So the engineer goes out there and the guy had just trailed the "magic" cables out along the ground. And they didn't help! Amazing! Apparently he thought the cables MADE the energy to start the car or something.

41 posted on 04/18/2013 8:47:46 PM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: ro_dreaming
"Instead of bigger batteries, a metric crap-ton of smaller batteries that take no time to recharge, but with a large quantity of them, a long time to discharge. Interesting thought!"

Given the matrix geometry, it might also mean that the individual small cells could be spaced suffiently far apart that a failure of a single cell couldn't set off a "chain reaction" among the other cells.

42 posted on 04/19/2013 7:17:51 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: 762X51
No doubt the cost curve on these devices will bottom out pretty near modern gunpowder in terms of power per cubic cc ~ which will mean we can eliminate 'fire arms' and go to smaller, more concealable, more powerful weapons as cheap as Saturday Night specials.

Beef up the point of your finger with maybe a layered iron matrix interspersed with graphene and hook that up to these microbatteries spaced out in the long bones of your hand.

Just wave your hand at your enemies (to give the microprocessor in your thumb an idea of where you want to aim) then POINT and shoot!

Some of the details will need to be worked out, but there's an awful lot of long bones to stash these things (or their even more powerful successors) in!

43 posted on 04/28/2013 6:53:25 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Revolting cat!
Thought I'd see how this thread is going ~ just to make sure it's still here.

Occurred to me just last evening that this type of battery is just the ticket to weapons systems that carry target destroying energy in the form of electrons rather than chemicals, or kinetic energy in a heavy lead projectile.

You'd need little in the way of a 'firing station' to launch these batteries at any target ~ a small DRONE, maybe a bumble bee sized drone, could deliver a battery bomb on target. Those 3D printers could churn out all sorts of mounting brackets for deceptive launchpads and you'd never even know you were inside the perimeter of a pretty deadly 'mine field'.

I think the nature of war just changed a whole big bunch ~ and this will probably be the last article we see about this class of battery, or its competitor designed by that young woman who just won the national science fair.

Your basic AR15 could be turned into a really outstanding launch pad for delivery of bunkerbusters!

44 posted on 06/04/2013 5:38:37 PM PDT by muawiyah
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