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April 26th is Confederate Memorial Day in Georgia
Canada Free Press ^ | April 23, 2013 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 04/23/2013 3:28:30 PM PDT by BigReb555

Did you know Black Confederate soldiers are buried on the grounds of Atlanta’s Morehouse College, a 4 year historically Black college, located on the highest ground where the Battle of Atlanta was fought?

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: heritage; southern
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April 26th is Confederate Memorial Day in Georgia

Do you remember when Confederate Memorial Day was observed in public schools?

It was a special time when businesses and schools closed in observance of Confederate Memorial Day. It was a day when many thousands of people would congregate at the Confederate cemetery for the day's events that included: a parade, memorial speeches, military salute and children laying flowers on the soldiers' graves. The band played "Dixie" and the soldier played taps.

April is Confederate History and Heritage Month throughout the Southern USA and it’s also the month that many States of Old Dixie still celebrate Confederate Memorial Day! The State of Georgia will celebrate it this Friday.

Confederate Memorial Day has been a legal holiday in Georgia since 1874 by an act of the Georgia General Assembly and bill signed by then Governor James Smith, who also served as Confederate Colonel, Lawyer and Congressman.

Efforts to mark Confederate graves, erect monuments, hold memorial services and get Confederate Memorial Day recognized as an official holiday was the idea of Lizzie Rutherford and Mrs. Charles J. Williams of the Ladies Memorial Association of Columbus, Georgia.

April is a great time to take your family lately to Stone Mountain Memorial Park located near Atlanta, Georgia. The larger than life Southern Memorial carving there of American heroes Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee is awesome to behold and a great educational experience for young and old, Black and White, Northerner and Southerner and people from around God’s good earth.

Did you know Black Confederate soldiers are buried on the grounds of Atlanta’s Morehouse College, a 4 year historically Black college, located on the highest ground where the Battle of Atlanta was fought?...And, not far from here is Marietta’s Confederate Cemetery which is the final resting place of Black Confederate Drummer Bill Yopp and 3,000 of his fellow comrades.

Tennessee Senator Edward Ward Carmack said it best in 1903; quote “The Confederate Soldiers were our kinfolk and our heroes. We testify to the country our enduring fidelity to their memory. We commemorate their valor and devotion. There were some things that were not surrendered at Appomattox. We did not surrender our rights and history; nor was it one of the conditions of surrender that unfriendly lips should be suffered to tell the story of that war or that unfriendly hands should write the epitaphs of the Confederate dead. We have the right to teach our children the true history of the war, the causes that led up to it and the principles involved.” unquote

Black History Month, Jewish History Month, Hispanic History Month and Women’s History Month is a time set aside to remember the best contributions of a people and the word “controversial” is never used to describe these Americans.

Why then do people including some in the news media refer to remembering our family on Confederate Memorial Day as controversial? The fact is that men and women of European, African, Hispanic, American Indian, Jewish and even Chinese took their stand in defense of the South “Dixie” during the War Between the States, 1861-1865.

The Constitution of the Confederates States of America will be exhibited from 8:00 am until 5:00 pm at the University of Georgia on “Confederate Memorial Day” Friday, April, 26, 2013, Special Collections Library, 300 South Hull St – Athens, Georgia.

See complete details at: http://www.libs.uga.edu/blog/?event=confederate-constitution-on-display

Today, those of little knowledge about those men of gray attack the Confederate flag that was bravely carried in many battles...And they want the Confederate flag removed from many places including the Confederate statue at the State Capitol in Columbia, South Carolina. When the soldiers of Blue and Gray walked the earth, few criticized these men.

April is Confederate History and Heritage Month. Read more on face book at: https://www.facebook.com/ConfederateHeritageMonth

1 posted on 04/23/2013 3:28:30 PM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

Save your confederate money boys! The south will rise again!

From my childhood in the old south.

2 posted on 04/23/2013 3:43:20 PM PDT by mc5cents
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To: BigReb555

There was a cover-up of the Civil War going way back, and records of the cover-up still exist today.

Because Lincoln’s Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, estimated that after the war there were going to be enormous numbers of lawsuits, he ordered extraordinary levels of records retention. And when the Union Army captured Confederate records, their records were added to the mix. Today this provides an incredible snapshot into the people of the time.

From 1891, many Confederate soldiers applied to receive their pensions from the former Confederate states. So when the southern states decided to pay pensions, they had extensive enlistment rosters to work from, from the archive.

However, when black veterans applied for their pensions, and when asked, replied they had been soldiers, if their names were annotated in the Confederate records as “soldier”, it was lined through, and an alternative occupation, usually “servant” was handwritten next to it.

Even before the turn of the century, the official story was dictated that no blacks had served in the Confederate army as soldiers. And that official story remains today, and is vehemently defended as the truth in most histories.

The real truth is far less clear. In some southern states, there was a substantial population of black freemen, many of whom were entrepreneurs. And while in some states there was a strict prohibition against black enlistments, in other states there was far less so.

Likewise many officers of means did retain servants, black and white, and sometimes these servants were indeed enlisted men. And it would not be uncommon for them to be armed for their duties, such as guarding the officers goods and horse from thieves.


3 posted on 04/23/2013 4:30:15 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: BigReb555

15th Virginia Salute, Patrick Henry Rifles.

4 posted on 04/23/2013 4:34:54 PM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BigReb555

State Government is closed on this day.


5 posted on 04/23/2013 6:44:23 PM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to thoe tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: autumnraine

A monument should be erected honoring the Black Confederates—or a movie should be made of them who gave so much—hoping that, after the war their lot, and the lot of blacks in the south would improve. Records exist of their heroism under fire—writen by White Confederate offices—some even slave owners—of what they did. Records exist in Yankee files as well of these men. It is time to tell the story of these forgotten Rebels.


6 posted on 04/23/2013 9:28:42 PM PDT by Forward the Light Brigade (Into the Jaws of H*ll)
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To: BigReb555

All those people who took up arms against the US in 1860-1865 were committing treason. In the main, they were deluded by the slave power which started the war. The survivors were, with one exception, given pardon by the generosity of the US government on the condition that they cease treason.


7 posted on 04/23/2013 9:42:11 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

North Carolina had a large proportion of freedmen, and these had, until 1835, been permitted to vote.

As antebellum slavery became more lucrative, freedmen’s rights were diminished, and limitations on them became greater.

The slave power continued to enforce slavery over a population that became increasingly white due to the frequent rape of slave women by white masters and overseers, so much so that some poor whites were captured by slave catchers, and sold into slavery, with paperwork forged as necessary. Mostly white female slaves sold at a premium into the brothels, and were very popular with the southern gentlemen.

After the war, to the extent possible, defeated southerners tried to reestablish the antebellum conditions via the KKK, or through black codes, literacy tests, harsh sentences to plantation-jails such as the infamous Angola prison. Mass murders of blacks occurred such as the Rosewood Massacre right after a KKK rally at Gainesville Florida in 1922. Southern Democrats were long able to use southern mythos to block federal laws to punish lynching. Blacks were routinely prevented from voting, serving on jury, or serving in civil service positions.


8 posted on 04/23/2013 9:54:11 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

One officer of means, a R.E. Lee had a servant who was both black and white. His cook, Mack Lee was his son by a slave woman.


9 posted on 04/23/2013 9:56:18 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: donmeaker

“All those people who took up arms against the US in 1860-1865 were committing treason. “

All those people who took up arms against Great Britain in 1775-1783 were committing treason. A comparison that you never can explain away in your monomaniacal hatred of the South.

BTW, donny, do you get a lot of your material from ‘The Rad Geek’s People’s Daily”? I think that you do.


10 posted on 04/23/2013 10:15:08 PM PDT by Pelham (Without Deportation you have De Facto Amnesty.)
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To: donmeaker
One officer of means, a R.E. Lee had a servant who was both black and white. His cook, Mack Lee was his son by a slave woman.

Mack Lee was a fraud. He had no connection with Lee during the war much less any blood relationship to him.

11 posted on 04/24/2013 3:42:21 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: Pelham
All those people who took up arms against Great Britain in 1775-1783 were committing treason. A comparison that you never can explain away in your monomaniacal hatred of the South.

That's true, and had they lost their rebellion then no doubt most of the American leadership would have been hung. But the difference is that they didn't lose their rebellion, did they?

12 posted on 04/24/2013 3:43:43 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: Forward the Light Brigade
A monument should be erected honoring the Black Confederates—or a movie should be made of them who gave so much—hoping that, after the war their lot, and the lot of blacks in the south would improve. Records exist of their heroism under fire—writen by White Confederate offices—some even slave owners—of what they did. Records exist in Yankee files as well of these men. It is time to tell the story of these forgotten Rebels.

Why not? I have no doubt that such a move would have all the historical accuracy of Speilberg's Lincoln.

13 posted on 04/24/2013 3:46:01 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: Pelham
Any comparison between the War for Independence and the Civil War is specious.

I understand why the secessionists wanted to make that comparison - it had great usefulness as propaganda. But it is still specious.

The cause of war in 1775 was the government refusing to allow Americans any representation in Parliament at all. They were barred from participating in any election and had no voice in their government.

The secessionists had no such grievance: their cause of war was - despite the fact that they were heavily overrepresented in Congress - that they had lost an election.

14 posted on 04/24/2013 7:30:06 AM PDT by wideawake
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To: Forward the Light Brigade
In reality, blacks were not legally permitted to serve as Confederate soldiers until March 13th, 1865 and the order was not authorized until March 23rd, 1865.

According to Confederate records only 40 or 50 had been recruited and had yet to be deployed before the Confederacy dissolved on May 5th, 1865. So as far as the Confederate government was concerned, no black men fought for the Confederacy.

There are a number of anecdotal claims that black men were allowed to take up arms on an ad hoc basis in a number of engagements, but those remain anecdotal.

Certainly many blacks worked as camp servants, as mule drivers and as musicians in the Confederate forces and there were some units from Louisiana that never saw combat which were allowed a brief ceremonial existence by that state, but that really isn't the same.

On the other hand, the service of black men as Union volunteers and combat veterans is very well-documented both from direct personal accounts during and immediately after the war, as well as in official records including enlistment rolls, after-action reports, contemporary press accounts, and also in the memoirs of Union officers.

We have the names, ranks, and service records of large numbers of these men.

15 posted on 04/24/2013 7:54:29 AM PDT by wideawake
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To: donmeaker

“As antebellum slavery became more lucrative...”

This is an important point, because before the popularity of the cotton gin, slavery was pretty much dying as an institution. Slaves were limited to the upper classes, being relatively very expensive, and about half were domestic servants. Troublesome slaves were “sold down the river” (the origin of that expression), to do (very) hard labor on the delta sugar cane plantations.

But plantation economics were very different than imagined.

To start with, there were several periods of time when large amounts of field work was needed: planting, weeding, harvesting, then both transporting to market and processing for food storage, and brewing beer and distilling liquor, which was “rural currency” for excess crops, and for when potable water was not reliable.

And though itinerant work gangs would sell cords of wood for fuel, its use required a lot of wood chopping, hauling and fire stoking and cleaning. Likewise, recent archaeology has noted that main plantation buildings had water towers next to them, that must have taken a lot of water, and labor, to fill.

Likewise the slaves themselves needed cooked food, water, shelter, etc., that had to be provided for.

Everything that could not be fabricated had to be purchased, which meant either that the plantation had to be profitable, or would diminish the assets of the plantation owner, who likely had to have other business interests.

And these could be roller coasters. Leading up to the Panic of 1819, commodities prices became very inflated, so plantations would get a great inflow of cash. But with the panic, prices collapsed.

This was so onerous that by 1828, South Carolina created the “nullification crisis” against the “Tariff of Abominations”, the Tariff of 1828.

“The major goal of the tariff was to protect industries in the northern United States which were being driven out of business by low-priced imported goods by putting a tax on them. The South, however, was harmed directly by having to pay higher prices on goods the region did not produce, and indirectly because reducing the exportation of British goods to the US made it difficult for the British to pay for the cotton they imported from the South.”

And thus slavery was dying, but facing a new resurgence, with the arrival of the cotton gin around 1830.

Times improved considerably until the Panic of 1837, the worst depression until the Great Depression, which crashed the price of cotton and likely wiped out many plantations, and yet it accomplished two things, consolidating southern agriculture from many crops to just a few, mostly cotton, with production expanding from 750,000 bales in 1830 to 2.85 million bales in 1850.

But cotton was so profitable that slavery was no longer the domain of the wealthy, but was opened to middle class entrepreneurs, strictly interested in the bottom line. With just their own work in a single year, they could earn enough to buy a slave, which would double the land they could use to produce cotton. And with the profit from that, to double again. Soon they were wealthy.

And the demand for, and treatment of slaves became much, much worse.


16 posted on 04/24/2013 8:58:13 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: 0.E.O

“But the difference is that they didn’t lose their rebellion, did they?”

That doesn’t change the logical equivalence of the two one iota.


17 posted on 04/24/2013 11:47:29 AM PDT by Pelham (Without Deportation you have De Facto Amnesty.)
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To: Pelham
That doesn’t change the logical equivalence of the two one iota.

Winning changes everything. I think Tiger Woods said that in a Nike ad.

18 posted on 04/24/2013 11:49:01 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: 0.E.O

Yes, and we all know what a philosopher Tiger Woods is.

Using the ‘Winning changes everything’ premise the Red Army was ‘right’ as long as they managed to crush everyone trying to escape from the Iron Curtain.

But then the Brezhnev Doctrine did sound eerily similar to the demand for an unbreakable union that we have seen elsewhere, so go figure.


19 posted on 04/24/2013 12:06:44 PM PDT by Pelham (Without Deportation you have De Facto Amnesty.)
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To: Pelham
But then the Brezhnev Doctrine did sound eerily similar to the demand for an unbreakable union that we have seen elsewhere, so go figure.

Or a cause dedicated to keeping 3 million of its own people in perpetual bondage as property?

20 posted on 04/24/2013 12:10:50 PM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: Pelham; 0.E.O
Actually the reverse applies to the Civil War.

The Lost Cause contingent got to write much of the history and produce much of the cultural lore surrounding the Civil War.

The losing side wrote the script that the US operated under from 1876 to 1963.

Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind were the movies that epitomized the war in American minds for generations.

Gone With the Wind was the most important novelistic treatment of the war for the same period.

William Faulkner and John Crowe Ransom and Robert Penn Warren helped build a literary world that made the old Confederacy seem like a noble, if flawed, project.

Douglas Southall Freeman wrote the preeminent hagiography of Robert E. Lee and Shelby Foote wrote probably the most popular treatment of the Civil War for the general populace.

The Civil War is the first war where the losers and their descendants wrote most of the history.

21 posted on 04/24/2013 12:54:50 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: wideawake

“The Civil War is the first war where the losers and their descendants wrote most of the history. “

Don’t despair. The Era of the South Haters is in full bloom right now. Enjoy.


22 posted on 04/24/2013 8:10:23 PM PDT by Pelham (Without Deportation you have De Facto Amnesty.)
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To: Pelham

I have, on my desk, a copy of the oath of one George Washington.
I George Washington, Commander in Chief of the Armies of the United States of America do acknowledge the United States of America to be Free, Independent, and Sovereign States, and declare that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obediance to George the Third, King of Great Britain; and i renounce, refute and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him; and I do Swear that I will to the utmost of my power, support, maintain and defend to said United States, against the said King George the Third, his heirs and successors and his or their abettors, assistants and adherents, and will serve the said United States in the office of Commander in Chief ... which I now hold, with fidelity, according to the best of my skill and understanding. G. Washington”

The difference: The colonies did not pretend to legal secession, rather they revolted, which only became legal because they won. If they had lost, G. Washington and the others would probably have been hung. That requires real bravery, real commitment, and is only attempted for the most serious of causes, which you can find explained in the Declaration of Independence.

By contrast, secession at pleasure, as pretended by the slave power which ruled the southern states, followed by attempting a war against the legitimate US government for spurious causes deserves nothing but my contempt, no matter the courage of their devoted but deluded soldiers.


23 posted on 04/24/2013 10:20:49 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

In particular the demand for partly white slaves to serve in the ‘Big House’ and mostly white female slaves to serve in the brothels greatly increased.


24 posted on 04/24/2013 10:23:34 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: donmeaker

“The difference: The colonies did not pretend to legal secession, rather they revolted, which only became legal because they won. If they had lost, G. Washington and the others would probably have been hung. “

And those of us with patriot ancestors would be listening to independence haters denouncing Washington and company as evil slave owning traitors. The same drill that neoyankees now do, but just with a new target.


25 posted on 04/24/2013 10:29:02 PM PDT by Pelham (Without Deportation you have De Facto Amnesty.)
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To: Pelham

Depends on if you think that taking a city, disarming its citizens, starving the people, and seizing their property is a legitimate peacetime function of the government.

If you do, then you would be a Tory during the Revolution. If you don’t you would perhaps be a Patriot.

Of course during wartime, especially a war begun and declared by others against your nation, different rules apply.


26 posted on 04/24/2013 11:24:53 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: Pelham

We don’t hate the south, rather we love the truth.


27 posted on 04/24/2013 11:25:46 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: donmeaker

“We don’t hate the south, rather we love the truth”

That’s really sad. If someone were to try to choose FR’s premier purveyor of malicious falsehoods about the South you’d be in the running.

You ought to at least admit what you do, as it’s obvious to everyone else. What was your latest? That Mack Lee was Robert E Lee’s illegitimate son? Well Mack Lee would certainly have been honored were that true considering the affection that he held for Lee. Those who are curious can read Mack Lee’s book for themselves:

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/lees%20slave.htm

But your claim has even less credibility than the Collander tales about Jefferson and Sally Hemmings. You post it simply to try to slander Lee, which is little surprise. Let’s contrast your scurrilous ravings with what one Republican President had to say about Lee:

“In 1907, on the 100th anniversary of Lee’s birth, President Theodore Roosevelt expressed mainstream American sentiment, praising Lee’s “extraordinary skill as a General, his dauntless courage and high leadership,” adding, “He stood that hardest of all strains, the strain of bearing himself well through the gray evening of failure; and therefore out of what seemed failure he helped to build the wonderful and mighty triumph of our national life, in which all his countrymen, north and south, share.”

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/robertlee.html#ixzz2RSMJwBdY


28 posted on 04/25/2013 12:17:14 AM PDT by Pelham (Without Deportation you have De Facto Amnesty.)
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To: donmeaker

Things were incredibly more diverse in the South than are typically known. Louisiana is jaw droppingly complex compared to most of the rest, yet comparing them to, say, North Carolina of the time, it is amazing they could both exist in the same United States.

Here is a well written piece on the subject:

http://christophelandry.com/2011/02/04/louisiana-myths-quadroons-octoroons/


29 posted on 04/25/2013 7:04:11 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: Pelham
The Era of the South Haters is in full bloom right now.

That clearly isn't true.

Much of the new history being written on the Civil War over the past two decades has been written by sympathetic Southerners or non-ideological Southerners and Northerners.

I would point to Gordon C. Rhea's ongoing project on Grant's Overland Campaign, and Peter Cozzens excellent multi-volume series on the war in the West on the Southern side.

Stephen Sears' (Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Peninsula) and Noah Trudeau's (Gettysburg, Sherman's March, Petersburg) works on the Northern side, while they do not buy into the unsustainable Lost Cause myth any more than Rhea or Cozzens do, present a hard-headed picture of the Union's achievements - not a fawning portrait.

I am not aware of any best-selling writer or prominent military historian specializing in the Civil War who takes an aggressive, partisan, one-sided view of the conflict.

I would also point out that the best-selling social historian on the antebellum South, the late Eugene Genovese, was also extremely evenhanded in his treatment of the subject and exploded a number of ideological myths about the South in his work.

30 posted on 04/25/2013 7:14:23 AM PDT by wideawake
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To: donmeaker

If George Washington had been born in the 1820’s, do you think he would have been a Confederate?


31 posted on 04/25/2013 7:26:12 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: donmeaker; Pelham
August 9, 1960

Dear Dr. Scott:

Respecting your August 1 inquiry calling attention to my often expressed admiration for General Robert E. Lee, I would say, first, that we need to understand that at the time of the War Between the States the issue of Secession had remained unresolved for more than 70 years. Men of probity, character, public standing and unquestioned loyalty, both North and South, had disagreed over this issue as a matter of principle from the day our Constitution was adopted.

General Robert E. Lee was, in my estimation, one of the supremely gifted men produced by our Nation. He believed unswervingly in the Constitutional validity of his cause which until 1865 was still an arguable question in America; he was thoughtful yet demanding of his officers and men, forbearing with captured enemies but ingenious, unrelenting and personally courageous in battle, and never disheartened by a reverse or obstacle. Through all his many trials, he remained selfless almost to a fault and unfailing in his belief in God. Taken altogether, he was noble as a leader and as a man, and unsullied as I read the pages of our history.

From deep conviction I simply say this: a nation of men of Lee’s caliber would be unconquerable in spirit and soul. Indeed, to the degree that present-day American youth will strive to emulate his rare qualities, including his devotion to this land as revealed in his painstaking efforts to help heal the nation’s wounds once the bitter struggle was over, we, in our own time of danger in a divided world, will be strengthened and our love of freedom sustained.

Such are the reasons that I proudly display the picture of this great American on my office wall.

Sincerely,

Dwight D. Eisenhower

32 posted on 04/25/2013 7:31:07 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: donmeaker

“All those people who took up arms against the US in 1860-1865 were committing treason.”

You could say the same ting about the Revolutionary War, so do you hate this nation, too, because it was started by treason?


33 posted on 04/25/2013 7:32:32 AM PDT by CodeToad (Liberals are bloodsucking ticks. We need to light the matchstick to burn them off.)
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To: 0.E.O

“Or a cause dedicated to keeping 3 million of its own people in perpetual bondage as property”

Slavery was started in the North by a black man enslaving another black man, so do you hate black men and the North, too?


34 posted on 04/25/2013 7:34:34 AM PDT by CodeToad (Liberals are bloodsucking ticks. We need to light the matchstick to burn them off.)
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To: donmeaker
Total number of persons arrested after the war for treason: 1 (Jefferson Davis)

Total tried for treason: 0.

Total number arrested for war crimes: 2

Henry Wirz was one of only two Confederates, tried convicted and executed for war crimes during the Civil War. The other was Samuel "Champ" Ferguson. Ferguson was a Confederate Guerrilla who admitted to killing more that 100 people, mostly civilians, who were sympathetic to the Union. He was tried for 53 murders and on October 10, 1865, was convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged on October 20, 1865.

35 posted on 04/25/2013 7:43:43 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: CodeToad

I accept the reasons give in the Declaration of Independence as adequate to justify their actions.

I reject the reasons given in the documents of the pretended confederacy as inadequate to justify their actions.

Clear enough?


36 posted on 04/25/2013 9:57:47 AM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: central_va

Thank you for the correction.


37 posted on 04/25/2013 9:58:17 AM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: Pelham

See, I am not a politician interested in creating a false mythos for political gain.


38 posted on 04/25/2013 9:59:31 AM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: CodeToad

Slavery had actually been started long before then, if the Bible has any truth in it. The Romans had slavery. The Greeks had slavery. The Spanish had slavery. The Arabs had slavery. Native Americans had slavery too, but its nature was sufficiently different that I suggest its differences were greater than its common features with that as instituted in the antebellum south.


39 posted on 04/25/2013 10:02:32 AM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: central_va

Darned if I know. Why don’t you ask him?


40 posted on 04/25/2013 10:04:18 AM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
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To: Pelham
“In 1907, on the 100th anniversary of Lee’s birth, President Theodore Roosevelt expressed mainstream American sentiment, praising Lee’s “extraordinary skill as a General, his dauntless courage and high leadership,” adding, “He stood that hardest of all strains, the strain of bearing himself well through the gray evening of failure; and therefore out of what seemed failure he helped to build the wonderful and mighty triumph of our national life, in which all his countrymen, north and south, share.”

Seven years ealier this is what Roosevelt had to say about another general:

"Grant, in short, stood for the great elementary virtues, for justice, for freedom, for order, for unyielding resolution, for manliness in its broadest and highest sense. His greatness was not so much greatness of intellect as greatness of character, including in the word "character" all the strong, virile virtues. It is character that counts in a nation as in a man. It is a good thing to have a keen, fine intellectual development in a nation, to produce orators, artists, successful business men; but it is an infinitely greater thing to have those solid qualities which we group together under the name of character—sobriety, steadfastness, the sense of obligation toward one's neighbor and one's God, hard common sense, and, combined with it, the lift of generous enthusiasm toward whatever is right. These are the qualities which go to make up true national greatness, and these were the qualities which Grant possessed in an eminent degree."

Link

41 posted on 04/25/2013 10:09:42 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: central_va

“I think Ulysses S. Grant is vastly underrated as a man and as a general. I know people think this and that about his drinking habits, which I think have been exaggerated way out of line. The fact is, he never demanded more men or material from the war department, he took over an army that had a long history of retreating and losing. That army had no confidence in their fighting ability and Grant came in as a real outsider. He had so many disadvantages going into the 1864 campaign, now 100 years ago. But he met every test and rose to the occasion unlike I’ve ever seen in American history. He was a very tough yet very fair man and a great soldier. He’s not been given his due...Grant devised a strategy to end the war. He alone had the determination, foresight, and wisdom to do it. It was lucky that President Lincoln didn’t interfere or attempt to control Grant’s strategic line of thinking. Lincoln wisely left the war to Grant, at least in the concluding moves after he came east. Grant is very undervalued today, which is a shame, because he was one of the greatest American generals, if not the greatest.” — Dwight Eisenhower, July 1964


42 posted on 04/25/2013 10:14:24 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: CodeToad
Slavery was started in the North by a black man enslaving another black man, so do you hate black men and the North, too?

That would come as a heck of a surpise to all those Indians that the Spanish enslaved for decades before anyone came to what is now the Northern U.S.

43 posted on 04/25/2013 10:17:15 AM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: central_va

Not a chance.


44 posted on 04/25/2013 7:55:41 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: rockrr

If George Washington had been born in 1820 he would have been in grey uniform in 1861, no question. Your intellectual dishonesty noted.


45 posted on 04/26/2013 5:37:53 PM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: donmeaker

I think Col Wirz got the shaft. Yes, the suffering at Andersonville Prison was bad, but not on purpose. Only by neglect. Northern Prison could have been much better as the resources were there, Yankee atrocities were on purpose.


46 posted on 04/26/2013 5:40:35 PM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: 0.E.O

Grant was the greatest general of the war mostly because, unlike Lee, he had to overcome a massive amount of politics to fight in his way. Grant had to fight politicians as hard as he fought Lee.


47 posted on 04/26/2013 5:46:44 PM PDT by AppyPappy (You never see a massacre at a gun show.)
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To: central_va

“intellectual dishonesty”? coming from you that’s rich. So tell me - why do you believe a man like Washington would even share the same room with a bunch of traitors like the confeds?


48 posted on 04/26/2013 6:06:51 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: central_va
If George Washington had been born in 1820 he would have been in grey uniform in 1861, no question. Your intellectual dishonesty noted.

What do you base that on?

49 posted on 04/26/2013 6:36:02 PM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: central_va
I think Col Wirz got the shaft. Yes, the suffering at Andersonville Prison was bad, but not on purpose. Only by neglect. Northern Prison could have been much better as the resources were there, Yankee atrocities were on purpose.

It was Captain Wirz, and conditions in prisons on both sides was deliberate. And reprehensible. Wirz deserved what he got, but he shouldn't have been there alone. There are others North and South who should have swung as well.

50 posted on 04/26/2013 6:37:56 PM PDT by 0.E.O
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