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Newsbytes: Japan Kills Climate Agenda What Kyoto?
watts Up With That? ^ | April 26, 2013 | Anthony Watts

Posted on 04/26/2013 1:39:04 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Turns Back To Coal, Abandons Emissions Targets

From Dr. Benny Peiser at The GWPF

The Japanese government is moving to speed up the environmental assessment process for new coal-fired power plants. According to Japanese media reports, the government intends to make 12 months the maximum period for assessing and approving new coal-fired power plants as its utilities seek to develop more power stations to stem surging energy supply bills. With the government considering the closure of much of the installed nuclear capacity over the medium term, the spotlight is back on coal as the cheapest energy source, notwithstanding plans to cut carbon emissions. A commitment to slice 2020 carbon emissions by 25 per cent from their 1990 level will be revised by October, according to Japanese newspaper reports. –Brian Robins, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 April 2013

Japan is likely to abandon an ambitious pledge to slash greenhouse gas emissions by a quarter, the top government spokesman said on Thursday. Asked to confirm if the new administration would review Tokyo’s 2009 pledge, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said the government was “moving in that direction in principle”. “I have been saying for some time that it is a tremendous target and would be impossible to achieve,” he told a regular news conference. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s business-friendly Liberal Democratic Party ousted the Democratic Party in December elections after pledging to review the emissions cut target in light of the post-Fukushima switch to fossil fuels. –AFP, 24 January 2013

New technology and a little-known energy source suggest that fossil fuels may not be finite. Estimates of the global supply of methane hydrate range from the equivalent of 100 times more than America’s current annual energy consumption to 3 million times more. –Charles C Mann, The Atlantic, May 2013

Across Europe, both policy makers and the public remain wary of the potential environmental impact of technologies like hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, used to extract shale gas. A slowdown in Europe’s efforts to exploit its shale gas reserves, roughly 10 percent of the world’s deposits, could not come at a worse time for Europe’s companies, which are already suffering from a continental debt crisis and anemic growth and are becoming increasingly uncompetitive compared with rivals in the United States. –Mark Scott, The New York Times, 25 April 2013

MPs criticised the government on Friday for unnecessarily delaying development of shale gas, saying it should now encourage companies to come up with more accurate estimates of recoverable reserves. The lack of progress over the past two years in exploration and development of UK shale gas is disappointing and needs to speed up, members of the influential cross-party Energy and Climate Change Committee in parliament said in a report. –Reuters, 26 April 2013

The 18-month moratorium on shale gas drilling was a “scandal”, member of the UK House of Commons select committee on climate change Peter Lilley said late Monday. Lilley said that a fortnight’s trip to the US — the birthplace of the shale gas revolution — could have answered all the questions surrounding the risks of hydraulic fracturing, enabling shale gas production to start that much earlier. “Most of the concerns are either exaggerations or lies,” he said. –Platts, 24 April 2013

Europeans have spent hundreds of billions of euros on renewable energy – ultimately borne by taxpayers, consumers and Europe’s competitiveness – for no gain. As the shale gas revolution spreads, it promises to swamp the economics of green energy, leaving it dependent on unaffordable subsidies. –Rupert Darwall, City A.M. 25 April 2013


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: climatechange; coal; energy; europe; fracking; globalwarminghoax; japan; kyotoprotocol; natgas; shalegas

1 posted on 04/26/2013 1:39:04 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Banzai! Banzai! Banzai!


2 posted on 04/26/2013 1:40:43 PM PDT by MeganC (You can take my gun when you can grab it with your cold, dead fingers.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
post-Fukushima switch to fossil fuels.

Actually, that's rather unfortunate. Even though the Japanese are wising up about 'green' BS, they're still being chicken little about nuke power. Japan is a very resource-poor country, and considering their current economic situation (which is worse than ours), spending boatloads of extra money on additional imports of hydrocarbon fuel would put them even deeper in debt.

Their biggest mistake was building that plant on top of an active fault line near the ocean. Newer designs and better locations would greatly reduce the threat of another Fukushima, and considering their knack for innovation, would likely result in a better overall end product.

Alas, the politics of fear trumps common sense.

3 posted on 04/26/2013 2:08:46 PM PDT by bassmaner (Hey commies: I am a white male, and I am guilty of NOTHING! Sell your 'white guilt' elsewhere.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

When your nuke plants are wiped out and your debt is over 200% of your GDP, you go to the cheapest source of energy available.

Emissions are important to those countries rich enough to absorb the extra cost of lowering them.

Ask a man who has to cook over a fire how worried he is about the carbon emissions.


4 posted on 04/26/2013 2:09:32 PM PDT by SaxxonWoods (....Let It Burn....)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Kind of nice to be able to look abroad at other countries and see governments that work to benefit their own citizens. Wish we did that.


5 posted on 04/26/2013 2:14:45 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

when you have 30-40 ft walls of water coming at you, 6 inches of sea level rise in the next 60-100 years is not #1 on your priority list.


6 posted on 04/26/2013 2:18:52 PM PDT by UNGN (I've been here since '98 but had nothing to say until now)
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To: bassmaner

I was thinking the exact same thing, so therefore I will say, good post! :)


7 posted on 04/26/2013 2:21:47 PM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
They are risking a return of this guy:

Godzilla vs. the Smog Monster, US lobby card. 1972

8 posted on 04/26/2013 2:24:06 PM PDT by toast
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I don’t think Japan has any active mines anymore. They are mostly importing from Australia, who will be the chief beneficiary. If Aussieland can’t handle the influx, the U.S. might benefit. Our coal is less per ton, however, we’ll be shipping a longer distance.


9 posted on 04/26/2013 2:43:14 PM PDT by chopperman
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To: bassmaner

Japan biggest mistake was allowing the CIA to brainwash their public into accepting nuclear power after WWII. That is perhaps one of the most dangerous places on the planet to place nuclear power plants. Far too many earthquakes.


10 posted on 04/26/2013 3:29:07 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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