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How Does An Ice Age Start? With One Snowflake
News Optimist ^ | 4-17-2013 | Brian Zinchuk

Posted on 04/28/2013 8:00:37 AM PDT by blam

How Does An Ice Age Start? With One Snowflake

Illustration by Brian Zinchuk

The Empire has decided to invade the ice plant of Earth.

April 17, 2013
By Brian Zinchuk

Hindsight is 20/20, they say. So looking back several decades, the scientists agreed – if they had to pick a date when it all started, it was 2013.

Thirteen is aptly considered unlucky, for it was the year with no summer. Scratch that. It was the first year with no summer.

Moods were glum throughout Western Canada that spring. April showers were supposed to bring May flowers. Instead, all the precipitation would come as the “white stuff.” Regina kept reporting another centimetre every few days. Roofs started collapsing. Brendenbury lost the roof of its rink. Still, these things can happen any given year.

But by the May long weekend, people really began to worry. There was still snow on the ground. No farmer could plant a crop. Half-million dollar tractor-and-air seeder combinations sat idle. Premiers called emergency cabinet sessions to deal with the crisis. Without a spring planting, for anyone, the economy wasn’t just going to take a tailspin, it was going to crash and burn much worse than the 1930s. Farmers not seeding meant the base industry was in total collapse. While that was hard on the pocketbooks, it was worse for the stomach.

While much of the people’s food was imported– vegetables from California, fruit from overseas, you couldn’t truck in enough hay to feed the beef industry, nor grain to feed the pigs. With no hay crop that year, and a severe drought in the United States the previous year, there was no surplus to feed the animals. By July, three-year-old bales that were used for wind protection were fetching $200 a piece, if you could find them. By September, the beef herd had been culled by 75 per cent. There was no food, anywhere, to feed the cattle. After a brief time when stores couldn’t give away all the recently slaughtered beef, and pork, North America suddenly found itself on a vegan diet, deprived of most of its milk, too. After all, you couldn’t drink milk if you couldn’t feed the cows.

World grain prices quadrupled over four months with the realization that there would be no grain production from the Canadian West, and substantially less from the American plains.

Natural gas prices also shot up, well beyond their 2007 peaks. With people running their furnaces year round, stockpiles dried up and, by fall, drilling resumed in earnest.

“Climate change,” the people were told. “This is what happens when we drive gas-guzzling SUVs and burn coal. The world is getting warmer.”

But it wasn’t.

Statistical arguments can be made for anything, given enough numbers. For the past 30 years, climate scientists told anyone who would listen that the world was going to warm up. Sea levels would rise. Coastal populations would flee inland as massive cities the world over became inundated. But what they neglected to mention was that back in the 1970s, the same scientists had other concerns. Back then, they were concerned about another ice age coming.

What is an ice age? The math was simple, really. It snows more than it melts, and the snow stays year over year. Eventually it accumulates to form ice sheets. Over thousands of years, these ice sheets grow to be miles thick. Precious little can live on them, and nothing can live under them.

Yet this was the natural state for nearly all of Canada for roughly 80,000 of the past 100,000 years, and countless cycles before that. Mankind, for all of its recorded history from the time Abraham left Ur in Mesopotamia, had been living during the peak of the interglacial period. No one had written on clay tablets of the great ice age. So it was conveniently forgotten, even though the evidence of it was all around. Nearly every piece of land north of the 49th parallel around the world had been sculpted by those massive glaciers, everything from the hills to the rivers that flowed from them.

This time, the scientists could be more definitive. It started in 2013, when the snow stayed. The high reflectivity of snow prevented the ground’s absorption of the sun’s rays. The air is warmed by the ground radiating heat originally absorbed from the sun. The result was snow instead of rain.

Three years on, Canada was a shambles. Two thirds of the nation was out of work and on the run, almost all of them to the south. The rest were packing. The Americans welcomed them with open arms, at first. After all, if a million or so Mexicans came across the Rio Grande every year, surely they could absorb some Canucks. But they faced pressures too. With a shortened growing season, corn, one of the most caloric-intense foods on the planet, and the staple of the American diet, could no longer be grown. Millions would go hungry.

Of the Canadians who remained, they soon realized it was a losing battle. There’s only so much snow you can push. You can only build a snowblower so big. All trains were equipped with massive snowblowers, the types that previously had been seen only in the mountains. A few years later, trains could no longer run. The snow and ice had accumulated to the point where a track was simply a blown-in tunnel in a 15-foot tall snow bank.

By 2020, 85 per cent of Canada was no longer inhabitable. The capital for those that remained was moved to Vancouver. Most provinces ceased to exist, their borders erased by the ice sheets.

The funny thing is, in the earlier years, popular culture was enthralled with zombie apocalypses. Too bad they never realized the simple snow flake was their undoing. Like a zombie, it, too, would never yield.

— Pipeline News editor Brian Zinchuk drives a gas-guzzling SUV and lives within six miles of two coal-fired power plants, yet he still has nearly two feet of snow in his front yard. He can be reached at brian.zinchuk@sasktel.net.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: agenda21; climate; climatechange; globalcooling; globalwarming; globalwarminghoax; iceage; inevitable; reality; weather
It's Always Something. (IAS)

When Abraham lived in Ur, it was a coastal village on the Persian Gulf. Today, it is 100 miles inland.

Also, the Persian Gulf was completely dry during the Ice Age.

1 posted on 04/28/2013 8:00:37 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam

It starts with that damned neanderthal squirrel always trying to find somewhere to hide his nut.


2 posted on 04/28/2013 8:03:21 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: blam
Pipeline News editor Brian Zinchuk drives a gas-guzzling SUV and lives within six miles of two coal-fired power plants, yet he still has nearly two feet of snow in his front yard.



3 posted on 04/28/2013 8:03:49 AM PDT by tomkat
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To: blam

I was in Saskatoon for the May 2-4 weekend about 25 years ago. We were wearing parkas. It’s no colder now.


4 posted on 04/28/2013 8:12:48 AM PDT by Former Proud Canadian (Obamanomics-We don't need your stinking tar sands oil, we'll just grow algae.)
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To: Black Agnes; Kartographer
Saskatchewan Has Coldest Spring In A Century

Forecast is cold comfort for Calgarians tired of the chilly spring

Cold weather affecting spring-born calves in region

Target joins retailers’ cold-weather woes with forecast cut

(IAS)

5 posted on 04/28/2013 8:13:40 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam

You right wing nuts should not link me to this thread ... and you should not refer to me as a snowflake!

6 posted on 04/28/2013 8:13:54 AM PDT by Zakeet (If idiots could fly, Washington would be an airport)
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To: blam

7 posted on 04/28/2013 8:15:48 AM PDT by Zakeet (If idiots could fly, Washington would be an airport)
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To: blam

For 80,000 of the last 100,000 years most of Canada was essentially no different than Antarctica. Reverting to that is scary stuff...this is very well written.

People, understandably, have trouble understanding geologic time versus recorded history time. Recorded history goes back about 5,000 years - ice ages go back and forth every 100,000 years or so. The entire recorded history of the planet fits into one warm period. That period will end...and it may start during our lives, or it may not - but it will end, and the world will be a vastly different place from what it is now.


8 posted on 04/28/2013 8:20:02 AM PDT by BobL (Look up "CSCOPE" if you want to see something really scary)
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To: Former Proud Canadian

I was in Sacramento for the May 2-4 weekend about 25 years ago. We were wearing shorts. It’s not warmer now. ;)


9 posted on 04/28/2013 8:21:21 AM PDT by TauntedTiger (Keep away from the fence!)
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To: blam

From Texas to Florida, the states will be HUGE.

Imagine the crops we can grow if the Gulf of Mexico drops 200 feet or so.

Oh yeah, and the higher CO2 will make all plants grow much faster.


10 posted on 04/28/2013 9:30:30 AM PDT by darth
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To: darth
Imagine the crops we can grow if the Gulf of Mexico drops 200 feet or so.

Yeah....and 200 ft nearer all that OIL.

11 posted on 04/28/2013 9:44:19 AM PDT by spokeshave (The only people better off today than 4 years ago are the Prisoners at Guantanamo.)
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To: blam
Single snowflake....Wrong...

It has already started with a decline in the Sun's magnetic field.

Resulting in less sunspots over an extended period...

Welcome to another 400 year long mini ice age.

12 posted on 04/28/2013 9:46:49 AM PDT by spokeshave (The only people better off today than 4 years ago are the Prisoners at Guantanamo.)
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To: spokeshave

Imagine the drought that would ensue across the entire southeast if the Gulf were to be reduced in such a manner. I suspect it’s be a net loss of productive farmland.


13 posted on 04/28/2013 9:49:24 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: TEXOKIE

And another one...


14 posted on 04/28/2013 9:51:29 AM PDT by Twotone (Marte Et Clypeo)
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To: spokeshave
"It has already started with a decline in the Sun's magnetic field. "

Yup.

I've had my eye on that one too.

And, other possibilities...

Eighteen Hundred And Froze To Death (The Infamous 'Year Without Summer')

15 posted on 04/28/2013 10:05:55 AM PDT by blam
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To: spokeshave
It has already started with a decline in the Sun's magnetic field.

Resulting in less sunspots over an extended period...


Well, there goes 10 and 6 meter DX on the amateur radio bands. B-P
16 posted on 04/28/2013 10:18:39 AM PDT by Nowhere Man (Whitey, I miss you so much. Take care, pretty girl. (4-15-2001 - 10-12-2012))
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To: blam

It will start in NE Quebec.


17 posted on 04/28/2013 10:18:58 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (And winter is coming.)
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To: darth

Are you sure you don’t mean the “stakes will he hugh”?


18 posted on 04/28/2013 10:26:46 AM PDT by Theophilus (Not merely prolife, but prolific)
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To: spokeshave
Imagine the crops we can grow if the Gulf of Mexico drops 200 feet or so.

We could reclaim a lot of fertile submerged delta land.

19 posted on 04/28/2013 10:52:26 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (And winter is coming.)
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To: darth

In an Ice Age, cold dry wind blows hard directly west to east; the trees die out leaving cold dry grassland with lots of sand dunes all the way through Florida. The three bands of weather from the poles to the equator change to just two bands. Adequate rainfall for field crops will only exist near the equator. I think the massive chem-spraying is why we are colder and is to bring just that weather (Ice Age).


20 posted on 04/28/2013 10:58:44 AM PDT by RHS Jr (Pity the banksters when Jesus comes)
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To: darth

Can you just start planting corn or soybeans on lands that had been under a salty ocean for the last 10,000 years?


21 posted on 04/28/2013 11:04:24 AM PDT by Sawdring
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To: blam

“Also, the Persian Gulf was completely dry during the Ice Age.”

XLNT!!!! Less chance of getting swarmed by Iranian small boats loaded with VBIEDs....or attacked with their ASCMs.

Plus it is too hot up there in the Spring thru Fall.


22 posted on 04/28/2013 11:07:56 AM PDT by wxgesr (I want to be the first person to surf on another planet (Uranus)
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To: Mike Darancette; spokeshave
"We could reclaim a lot of fertile submerged delta land. "

Most scientists believe the worlds oceans dropped by 400 ft during the last Ice Age. I once had a map that showed the effect worldwide with a 400 ft (I believe it was 500 ft) drop in the oceans. Big Difference in the land mass.

Then you have Sundarland where I believe most of the worldwide human population lived and thrived during the Ice Age. The Bible will record the refugees from Sunderland as the wise men from the east, IMO.


23 posted on 04/28/2013 11:15:57 AM PDT by blam
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To: Sawdring; darth
"Can you just start planting corn or soybeans on lands that had been under a salty ocean for the last 10,000 years?"

I expect you'll find an answer here:

ZuiderZee


24 posted on 04/28/2013 11:22:29 AM PDT by blam
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To: Mike Darancette; spokeshave
Imagine the crops we can grow if the Gulf of Mexico drops 200 feet or so.

We could reclaim a lot of fertile submerged delta land.

IIRC, a drop of 200 ft. in sea level will roughly double the size of Florida. It should be very good land for crops. The problem is that it will take many years of rain to wash the salt out of it.

Garde la Foi, mes amis! Nous nous sommes les sauveurs de la République! Maintenant et Toujours!
(Keep the Faith, my friends! We are the saviors of the Republic! Now and Forever!)

LonePalm, le Républicain du verre cassé (The Broken Glass Republican)

25 posted on 04/28/2013 11:45:14 AM PDT by LonePalm (Commander and Chef)
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To: LonePalm
"The problem is that it will take many years of rain to wash the salt out of it. "

Apparently not as long as we think...I just read this from the ZuiderZee article from Holland:

"The stations, completed in February 1930, managed to drain the polder after six months of continuous pumping. "Drained" in this context does not mean the land was wholly dry; extensive pools of shallow water still littered the muddy landscape. To make the soil usable it had to be further drained by a network of drainage canals. Small ditches were dug leading to larger watercourses, which in turn transported their water to the main drainage canals. These canals, dredged when the polder was still filled with water, conducted surplus water to the pumping stations. The resulting dehydration caused the former seabed to sink by over a metre in some places. Once the ground had settled, the smaller ditches were replaced with underground drainage tubes, which would be used for the normal drainage of the polder."

"With the hydrological infrastructure in place, the virgin land was developed to prepare for its later cultivation. The first plant to establish itself, though more so in the later polders than in the Wieringermeer, was reed, sown from the air by plane onto the muddy flats while the polder was still being drained. This sturdy plant helped evaporate the water and bring air into the soil, thereby solidifying its structure and further preventing the emergence of unwanted weeds."

"After the first infrastructure was put in place, the reed was burnt and replaced by rapeseed, turning the newborn polder into a yellow sea of flowers in spring. These crops were succeeded by various grains. In the Wieringermeer the first was rye, but the later polders plant wheat, then barley, and finally oats. This process took years, but once finished allowed planting other crops. At the same time, other infrastructure such as roads and housing were built."

26 posted on 04/28/2013 12:02:05 PM PDT by blam
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To: Vince Ferrer; Black Agnes
2012/2013 North American Snow And Ice Charts


27 posted on 04/28/2013 12:07:01 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Interesting link. I prefer global warming to ice age since I live in Minnesota.


28 posted on 04/28/2013 12:09:01 PM PDT by Sawdring
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To: Mike Darancette

Not very fertile after spending thousands of years under salt water.


29 posted on 04/28/2013 12:38:37 PM PDT by Bubba_Leroy (The Obamanation Continues)
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To: blam

It doesn’t matter whether we are in for global warming or another ice age. Either way it is Bush’s fault and the only solution is more taxes.


30 posted on 04/28/2013 12:41:22 PM PDT by Bubba_Leroy (The Obamanation Continues)
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To: darth
From Texas to Florida, the states will be HUGE. Imagine the crops we can grow if the Gulf of Mexico drops 200 feet or so.

Go on Google Earth and see how much of the continental shelf around Florida is less than 200 feet in depth. Florida's area would expand about 50%

31 posted on 04/28/2013 1:17:50 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: Bubba_Leroy

See post #26. Doesn’t matter how many years it’s been under salt water. What matters is how much rain it gets, and how good the drainage is. Salt dissolves ready in water, and the rain will wash it away.


32 posted on 04/28/2013 1:23:20 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: Twotone

Thanks for the ping, Twotone!


33 posted on 04/28/2013 2:46:04 PM PDT by TEXOKIE (We must surrender only to our Holy God and never to the evil that has befallen us.)
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To: PapaBear3625

Around here In the Permian Basin we have salt scalds, I have two on my place. They’re caused when a well blows out and floods the surface with salt water. The oldest one is 70 years old and still nothing will seed out in it.


34 posted on 04/28/2013 2:49:27 PM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: PapaBear3625; darth; Black Agnes; Vince Ferrer

Sea levels reduced by 394 feet.(above)

Notice there's no Persian Gulf at all and the Red Sea is land locked and probably dried up too.

Sea travel west of Indonesia was blocked until the sea levels rose enough to open up the Straits Of Malacca about 7,000 years ago.

Sea levels today.


35 posted on 04/28/2013 3:19:00 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam; 11B40; A Balrog of Morgoth; A message; ACelt; Aeronaut; AFPhys; AlexW; alrea; ...
DOOMAGE!

Global ?Warming? PING!

You have been pinged because of your interest in environmentalism, alarmist wackos, mainstream media doomsday hype, and other issues pertaining to global warming.

Freep-mail me to get on or off: Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to all note-worthy threads on global warming.

Climate scientists come to terms with the lack of global warming

Canadian Minister: Put Up Or Shut Up On Keystone XL

Global Warming on Free Republic

Latest from Global Warming News

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Latest from Greenie Watch

36 posted on 04/28/2013 4:12:54 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (Drag Me From Hell!)
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To: BobL
"That period will end...and it may start during our lives, or it may not - but it will end, and the world will be a vastly different place from what it is now.

Not necessarily. If it becomes incontrovertible that an Ice Age has begun, I think that geological engineering will be applied. Specifically, it is very easy to increase the greenhouse effect. Probable candidate...sulfur hexafluoride dispersed in the stratosphere from high-flying jets. VERY stable molecule, 24,000 times more "greenhouse intensive" than CO2.

37 posted on 04/28/2013 6:35:09 PM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: RHS Jr
I think the massive chem-spraying is why we are colder...

Uh-oh.... Now you done did it.

Hope you enjoy your 'welcome' to Free Republic.

38 posted on 04/28/2013 8:26:02 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: Dusty Road
Around here In the Permian Basin we have salt scalds, I have two on my place. They’re caused when a well blows out and floods the surface with salt water. The oldest one is 70 years old and still nothing will seed out in it.

That puts you around west Texas or eastern New Mexico. How much rainfall (compared to Florida) and how good is the drainage?

39 posted on 04/29/2013 3:52:45 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: PapaBear3625

Yep right in the middle of the Permian Basin. Rain is hit or miss, in the last two years I’ve caught less than 15 inches about 5 years ago I caught over 40 inches. On the average I’ll get 14 to 16 inches per year. I’d rather have an oil spill than a saltwater spill, oil does far less damage.


40 posted on 04/29/2013 4:39:00 AM PDT by Dusty Road
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To: Dusty Road
On the average I’ll get 14 to 16 inches per year. I’d rather have an oil spill than a saltwater spill, oil does far less damage.

Tampa, Florida averages 7 inches per month in the summer, which would serve to wash away salt faster. Like I said, the speed with which salt gets washed out depends on the rainfall and how well the soil drains.

41 posted on 04/29/2013 5:43:43 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: Dusty Road
"Yep right in the middle of the Permian Basin. Rain is hit or miss, in the last two years I’ve caught less than 15 inches about 5 years ago I caught over 40 inches. On the average I’ll get 14 to 16 inches per year."

We get about five feet a year:

The Rainest City In The US

42 posted on 05/01/2013 9:53:40 PM PDT by blam
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To: TauntedTiger; Former Proud Canadian

I was in South Carolina for that weekend about 64 of the last 68 years. This is the first time we were wearing jackets instead of wiping sweat as well as I can recall.


43 posted on 05/10/2013 7:48:33 AM PDT by RipSawyer (I was born on Earth, what planet is this?)
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