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Why 3D-Printed Untraceable Guns Could Be Good For America
forbes.com ^ | 7 May, 2013 | Paul Hsieh

Posted on 05/07/2013 7:47:00 PM PDT by marktwain

(snip)

Similarly, honest citizens should not have a general obligation to disclose to the government what firearms they’ve built or bought, provided they are for honest purposes. An honest person may wish to keep this information private to avoid becoming the target of thieves or unwanted political attacks. A desire for private firearms ownership is not proof of “criminal intent.” And if the government has a specific concern that someone is planning a crime with a gun (or any other tool), the burden of proof should be on the government prior to any search or other invasion of his privacy. Otherwise, anyone owning an “untraceable” 3D-printed gun should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Wilson’s innovation could thus spark a much-needed re-examination of American gun laws, including the current paradigm of imposing ever-increasing restrictions on millions of honest gun owners in an attempt to stop relatively fewer bad guys from committing gun crimes. By making it harder (if not nearly impossible) for the government to regulate gun possession and transfers, his development could move the government to instead (properly) focus its efforts on punishing gun misuse.

That is why I’m encouraged by the development of 3D-printed guns. Not because I want bad guys committing more gun crimes. But because I hope it sparks some vigorous discussions on deeper themes such as “innocent until proven guilty” and the proper scope of government. If enough people start debating these questions, Cody Wilson will have done America a real service.

(Excerpt) Read more at forbes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 3dprinted; banglist; constitution; guncontrol; liberator; secondamendment
This innovation is a wonderful reminder of what has been the truth all along. Guns are 16th century technology. They have been made in home workshops for centuries.

The idea that you can control criminal access to guns has always been a totalitarian cover for controlling innocent men.

1 posted on 05/07/2013 7:47:00 PM PDT by marktwain
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To: marktwain
As a last resort, you can always buy one from a crooked cop. Lots of firearms go missing from property rooms.

/johnny

2 posted on 05/07/2013 7:50:17 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: marktwain

Remember when the Japanese decided against attacks to the US Mainland because there was a gun behind every blade of grass ?


3 posted on 05/07/2013 8:09:28 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The monsters are due on Maple Street)
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To: UCANSEE2

“Remember when the Japanese decided against attacks to the US Mainland because there was a gun behind every blade of grass?”

That can be used as slogan for the marijuana legalization campaign as well.


4 posted on 05/07/2013 8:26:26 PM PDT by Jyotishi (Seeking the truth, a fact at a time.)
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To: marktwain

Guns also ended feudalism. Minimum two week training for musket allowed farmers to kill a knight which took 7+ years to train.


5 posted on 05/07/2013 8:34:35 PM PDT by Fee (9/11 first shaking; 2008 finance collapse second shaking; 2015 ????)
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To: Fee

One of my college prerequisites (I thought at the time, a waste of time) was Asian History and during the feudal times in Japan, the turn of the tide that wasted the samurai was the advent of firearms. Whomever had guns usually wins the war.


6 posted on 05/07/2013 8:37:54 PM PDT by max americana (fired liberals in our company after the election, & laughed while they cried (true story))
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To: marktwain

What makes people believe printed guns/bullets would be untraceable?

The government has been able to trace every printout from every printer for a LONG time now.

The 3D printers will just add some code no one can normally see.

The government will use whatever means they did to make the printer manufacturers fall in line (including lots of foriegn mfgs).

It’s probably already fait accompli.


7 posted on 05/07/2013 8:40:52 PM PDT by swamp40
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To: swamp40
The government has been able to trace every printout from every printer for a LONG time now.

Trace - or match?

8 posted on 05/07/2013 8:48:16 PM PDT by jonno (Having an opinion is not the same as having the answer...)
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To: marktwain

Can’t wait to read the first thread after some punk uses an untraceable 3D printed gun to blow a cops brains out.


9 posted on 05/07/2013 9:02:34 PM PDT by bigbob
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To: jonno
Well, the printer serial # is on there, and the date it was printed - down to the minute.

They can probably match a serial # to a credit card, if one was used.

Or, the distributors probably forward security camera footage anytime cash is used for a printer purchase at Best Buy.

I'll bet the US government is 3 steps ahead of the average person's wildest dreams.

The 3D printers will probably print out your picture and address on the head of each firing pin - to be stamped into each casing when fired.

(Slightly facetious, but not by much.)

10 posted on 05/07/2013 9:09:55 PM PDT by swamp40
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To: bigbob; All

“Can’t wait to read the first thread after some punk uses an untraceable 3D printed gun to blow a cops brains out.”

I do not understand this fetish with “traceability”. Tracing guns almost never solves crimes. Once a gun is stolen, traceability does not matter.

The only thing traceability does is set up former owners for lawsuits, or more commonly, allow stolen guns to be returned to their lawful owners. That does nothing to stop crime.


11 posted on 05/07/2013 9:16:53 PM PDT by marktwain (The MSM must die for the Republic to live. Long live the new media!)
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To: swamp40; All
“The 3D printers will probably print out your picture and address on the head of each firing pin - to be stamped into each casing when fired.”

Not even close in your fevered dreams. A 3D printer does not even have to be connected to the Internet or a phone line. It is like a hi-tech lathe in a way. Even if the printer put a number on a part (highly unlikely) it would only trace to that printer, and no federal agent knows where it is.

Add the emerging technology of printers being able to print more printers, and those imaginary numbers mean nothing.

12 posted on 05/07/2013 9:21:19 PM PDT by marktwain (The MSM must die for the Republic to live. Long live the new media!)
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To: marktwain

The government will never be able to find them all, and that keeps the government on its toes.


13 posted on 05/07/2013 9:39:39 PM PDT by TBP (Obama lies, Granny dies.)
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To: Jyotishi
I came up with the poster, you come up with the slogan.


14 posted on 05/07/2013 9:44:41 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The monsters are due on Maple Street)
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To: swamp40

They can only trace it if you mail the warranty card in.
Otherwise they can match it but they have to know where it is


15 posted on 05/07/2013 11:28:23 PM PDT by Fai Mao (Genius at Large)
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To: swamp40

“Well, the printer serial # is on there, and the date it was printed - down to the minute.”

iirc, thats only color laser printers.


16 posted on 05/07/2013 11:34:01 PM PDT by Yehuda
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To: marktwain
I really don't get all the hysteria about 3d printed guns.
It seems to me that with every shot the barrel will become soft and lose it's strength, accuracy and ability to handle the pressure.
Couple that with the fact that ZIP Guns have been a fact of crime for decades and you can go to a Hardware Store and piece on together $10 verses the $1000 minimum cost of a 3D printer.
Don't give in to Hysteria.

17 posted on 05/08/2013 3:44:21 AM PDT by Falcon4.0
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To: marktwain

What I like about this young mans work is the fact that a free man used his intellect to take a modicum of power away from an increasingly tyrannical government. Schumer was wetting his pants the next day.

The more liberty we can take from government with our innovation, the more liberty they will try to take and the less relevant they will become.


18 posted on 05/08/2013 3:52:03 AM PDT by IamConservative (The soul of my lifes journey is Liberty!)
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To: Yehuda

That was discovered in 2005.

I’ll bet they’ve been working a bit since then.

MAC address and hard-drive serial # embedded into common fonts and pictures would be my bet.


19 posted on 05/08/2013 10:03:58 PM PDT by swamp40
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To: marktwain

Well, if it were me - I would embed a small virus inside the most commonly downloaded 3D gun files.

Run an ultra-fast server so all the torrents are sure to grab my files first.

Send a slightly different version to each one, that is identifiable only via microscope and knowledge of teh encryption used.

Then the virus would also attempt to grab the MAC address of the computer and modify the 3D gun slightly to also embed that info.

(But, that’s just me. I’m sure the government would NEVER figure all that out.)

PS I’m not really worried about 3D guns in the foreseeable future. There are about 350 million REAL guns in the US. If you can’t get your hands on one of those, even AFTER a wide-band confiscation, then you aren’t going to be a threat to anybody.

I’m just pointing out that if something is worth tracking, the fed gov can and will run circles around 99.99% of the general public.


20 posted on 05/08/2013 10:20:55 PM PDT by swamp40
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To: swamp40; All
Of course, there are simple countermeasures that negate all your efforts.

Buy your “free market” computer at a swap meet or garage sale.

Only hook up online through public wifi. Most wifi spots do *not* have cameras, at least not yet.

Keep your “clandestine” laptop offline the rest of the time.

I worked in the federal government for decades.

Yes, they can do amazing things. They are also capable of great stupidity and inefficiency.

21 posted on 05/08/2013 11:20:05 PM PDT by marktwain (The MSM must die for the Republic to live. Long live the new media!)
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To: swamp40

“MAC address and hard-drive serial # embedded into common fonts and pictures would be my bet.”

“MAC address and hard-drive serial #” from the computer doing the printing? You don’t think someone would have spotted this already?


22 posted on 05/09/2013 1:00:37 AM PDT by Yehuda
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To: marktwain

Defense Distruted’s site just went down....

The gov is mad at him...


23 posted on 05/09/2013 10:53:25 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: Yehuda

It’s not the easiest stuff to spot.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steganography


24 posted on 05/10/2013 9:01:04 AM PDT by swamp40
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To: swamp40

from your link:

“The ciphertext produced by most digital steganography methods, however, is not printable. Traditional digital methods rely on perturbing noise in the channel file to hide the message, as such, the channel file must be transmitted to the recipient with no additional noise from the transmission. Printing introduces much noise in the ciphertext, generally rendering the message unrecoverable. There are techniques that address this limitation, one notable example is ASCII Art Steganography.[17]”

They also acknowledge the color HP and Xerox color laser printers and the infamous dots.


25 posted on 05/10/2013 9:17:52 AM PDT by Yehuda
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