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To: marktwain

Perhaps somebody can answer a question for me, as I’m not really a gun expert.

It seems to me that existing 3d printed models, would tend to be very dangerous to fire.

Everybody agrees they only last so many rounds, and I assume one would really not want to be holding it when it fails.

Or am I missing something?


6 posted on 05/20/2013 8:58:06 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Sherman Logan
There is an engineering solution to that. Quantify the average lifetime. Get rid of the weapon when it is well within it's predicted lifetime and print another.

I don't intend to give up my heavy metal 1911 style carry piece, but these things are V1.0. I expect V12.8 will be much, much better. These are early days.

/johnny

11 posted on 05/20/2013 9:01:33 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Sherman Logan

When you’re defending your life, you only need it to fire once, for the most part. All the other cockroaches tend to scatter after that.


14 posted on 05/20/2013 9:04:50 PM PDT by Kevmo ("A person's a person, no matter how small" ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Sherman Logan
"It seems to me that existing 3d printed models, would tend to be very dangerous to fire...Everybody agrees they only last so many rounds, and I assume one would really not want to be holding it when it fails...Or am I missing something?"

All things are relative. Improvised firearms("zip guns") have long been made by prisoners, partisans, and others who have otherwise been prohibited access to conventionally manufactured weapons about as long as there have been firearms. They've been made from soft metals, wood, plastic etc. I suppose the users have conducted a rudimentary cost-benefit analysis and found that the risk of their firearms failure was an acceptable alternative to going entirely unarmed.

And certainly, while I would not want to be holding one when it blew, both the prior design from a week or two ago and this one fire the .380 which is a (relatively) low pressure cartridge which actually has a lower recommended chamber pressure than a .22 LR, which would minimize the collateral damage in the event of a catastrophic material failure.

22 posted on 05/20/2013 9:15:15 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: Sherman Logan

if you read up on the concept of liberator guns, you’ll know why.

also being able to make your wn guns freaks out anti-2a gun confiscators. which is funny because anyone can make a gun without a 3-d printer now.


36 posted on 05/20/2013 9:45:27 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I can neither confirm or deny that; even if I could, I couldn't - it's classified.)
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To: Sherman Logan

Two points:

1. I’ll take my chances with a dangerous gun in order to protect myself and loved ones from a dangerous criminal. I won’t take this gun to the range for sport shooting.

2. Printed guns will improve, just like all new technology. The Wright brothers’ first flight lasted 3 seconds. The first car wouldn’t qualify for the Indy 500.


54 posted on 05/21/2013 4:46:37 AM PDT by generally (Don't be stupid. We have politicians for that.)
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To: Sherman Logan
It seems to me that existing 3d printed models, would tend to be very dangerous to fire.

Everybody agrees they only last so many rounds, and I assume one would really not want to be holding it when it fails.

You're right, but as a former mechanical engineer, I wouldn't have expected a plastic gun barrel to survive a single test-firing.

So if plastic guns are already surviving 9 test-firings, it's not unreasonable to expect them to be safe and practical soon.

58 posted on 05/21/2013 5:00:13 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: Sherman Logan

There are a great many types of plastics. Some are brittle, while some are quite rubbery. It would be quite easy to print an outside layer of “rubbery” plastic around the hard interior plastic. That way, should the hard plastic fail, there would be no flying shards. This is essentially the same principle used in automobile safety glass (except that the stretchable plastic layer is sandwiched between two hard brittle layers of glass).


70 posted on 05/21/2013 12:40:10 PM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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