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King of My Castle? Yeah, Right (tenants' rights laws discourage renting)
New York Times ^ | June 6, 2013 | SCOTT JAMES

Posted on 06/07/2013 7:00:07 AM PDT by reaganaut1

SAN FRANCISCO — VISITORS have forever left their hearts in San Francisco. But leaving the rest of your body here isn’t so easy: there’s no place to live.

The City by the Bay is going through one of its worst housing shortages in memory. With typical high demand intensified by a regional boom in tech jobs, apartment open houses are mob scenes of desperate applicants clutching their credit reports. The citywide median rental price for a one-bedroom is $2,764 a month, but jumps to $3,500 in trendy areas.

One reason for the shortage? Me.

I’ve recently joined the ranks of San Francisco landlords who have decided that it’s better to keep an apartment empty than to lease it to tenants. Together, we have left vacant about 10,600 rental units. That’s about five percent of the city’s total — or enough space to house up to 30,000 people in a city that barely tops 800,000. I feel a twinge of guilt for those who want to settle in this glorious city but can’t find a flat. But after renting out a one-bedroom apartment in my home for several years, I will never do it again. San Francisco’s anti-landlord housing laws and political climate make it untenable.

My partner and I bought our home in the city’s Castro neighborhood in 2004. We live upstairs and there’s a smaller rental downstairs. At first we had wonderful tenants, and the income helped make our mortgage payments more affordable.

Then we rented to a man who began as a good neighbor, but who soon became a nuisance — and who eventually became destructive and dangerous. It started one night when the tenant forgot his keys and rang our doorbell at 2 a.m. until we let him in. Then it happened again and again and again.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; US: California
KEYWORDS: realestate; sanfrancisco
In the comments sections, many former landlords echo the author's experience.
1 posted on 06/07/2013 7:00:07 AM PDT by reaganaut1
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To: reaganaut1

2 posted on 06/07/2013 7:03:51 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: reaganaut1

“...My partner and I bought our home in the city’s Castro neighborhood in 2004...”

Maybe he should grow up and marry a woman instead of hanging out with faggots in faggotown.


3 posted on 06/07/2013 7:04:31 AM PDT by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: reaganaut1

Thank the Lord for a small, paid in full house in a non-demented area (generally speaking). They can keep their high dollar rental birdhouses in the chity dwellings.


4 posted on 06/07/2013 7:06:54 AM PDT by tflabo (Truth or Tyranny)
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To: reaganaut1

“I’ve recently joined the ranks of San Francisco landlords who have decided that it’s better to keep an apartment empty than to lease it to tenants.”

This is nonsense. Landlords don’t keep apartments empty, even where there are really bad tenant ordinances that are stacked against the landlord. It’s just not financially viable to pay the mortgage on a rental property if you are not renting it out.

“Together, we have left vacant about 10,600 rental units. That’s about five percent of the city’s total”

This demonstrates my point. Five percent vacancy is well within the natural range of vacancy in the apartment market. Three to five percent of the apartments in any area are usually vacant, not because landlords don’t want to rent them, but because they can’t lease them quickly enough to avoid some vacancy. There is no trend of landlords intentionally not renting, or the number would be higher.


5 posted on 06/07/2013 7:10:00 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: reaganaut1

See the Movie Pacific Heights, starring Michael Keaton and takes place in San Francisco.

He played the Ultimate “Problem Tenant” whose ultimate goal was to push the Landlord into an action that would allow him the ‘take’ the house legally. In the movie he failed but the tactics and extreme legal ramifications were discussed very frankly.


6 posted on 06/07/2013 7:11:03 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: reaganaut1

Look for the city to either commandeer or compel people to rent out their property through further fascist regulations. I wouldn’t put it passed them in this day and age.


7 posted on 06/07/2013 7:11:55 AM PDT by headstamp 2 (What would Scooby do?)
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To: reaganaut1

There is an easy way to handle tenants

Put in a high rent in the paper (in this cast $3000 a month should do) and then tall people who come to see that the rent is only $2500 - but you are VERY STRICT, you demand first, last, deposit, license, credit report, on-site inspecions on demand and signing a WAIVER OF THOSE STUPID RIGHTS - its amazing how many people will.

And if you are not intending to screw them yourself, then it is a win-win for all.


8 posted on 06/07/2013 7:13:02 AM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: dfwgator

Beat me! Great minds think alike. Oh yes, personally I hated the movie. But I watched it because of the premise and learned a lot from it.


9 posted on 06/07/2013 7:13:10 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: reaganaut1

9.6....... the Biggun

That will solve all the problems


10 posted on 06/07/2013 7:15:14 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 .....Lerner must be tried and executed..... crime against the Republic)
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To: Monterrosa-24

Maybe he should grow up and marry a woman instead of hanging out with faggots in faggotown.


My thoughts too, though you said it more eloquently. :-)


11 posted on 06/07/2013 7:16:32 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: reaganaut1

When you understand that marxists want to abolish private property, this makes perfect sense. They can’t seize it just yet, as they would like to, so they put restrictions on it so that it isn’t private property any more but we can enjoy the illusion that we actually ‘own’ something while we let the government confiscate a portion of it each year in what are called ‘property taxes.’


12 posted on 06/07/2013 7:17:23 AM PDT by I want the USA back (Pi$$ed off yet?)
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To: reaganaut1

—yep—thirty years ago when I lived there , it was already known by tenants that you could get away with about a ‘free’ year by starting the “protest” process-—


13 posted on 06/07/2013 7:18:30 AM PDT by rellimpank (--don't believe anything the media or government says about firearms or explosives--)
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To: dfwgator

If you check out padmapper, 2 bedrooms in SF run from 3000 to 5500. Which is nuts. I don’t get how people afford it; while rent control in old buildings men’s some people are paying little, I don’t get where the people with enough money to rent those places are coming from. You’d have to make 250k+ to actually afford those places. Either people who want to live in so-so apartments are richer than I thought, or they are sacrificing retirement savings and any hope of savaging up enough to buy a home.


14 posted on 06/07/2013 7:21:42 AM PDT by socalgop
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To: reaganaut1
"...those who want to settle in this glorious city"

...and don't mind stepping in human excrement on the sidewalks, fending off panhandlers, putting up with druggies at every turn, and worst of all existing in the "political climate" that produced everything Scott rales against in this article.

I couldn't wait to get as far away as possible from "Everyone's Favorite City". The last time I was there I left with the first throbbing headache I had had in years.

Every complaint launched in this article results from the mad atmosphere of "liberalism" that pervades San Francisco.

15 posted on 06/07/2013 7:21:47 AM PDT by Savage Beast (The forces of decadence are the forces of evil.)
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To: The Working Man
Rush mentioned that movie a while after it came out. He was talking to a California realtor who told him that under renter protection laws, that movie's scenario was very possible. The renter had all of the rights and could easily do what Keaton's character did.
16 posted on 06/07/2013 7:25:15 AM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult (Liberals make unrealistic demands on reality and reality doesn't oblige them.)
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To: reaganaut1

Housing prices are just ludicrous. I pay less than $1500 a month mortgage (including taxes) on a 2900 sq ft $300,000 new home in Texas. You people of the left and the other left coast are just nuts.


17 posted on 06/07/2013 7:28:30 AM PDT by Resolute Conservative
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To: socalgop

“2 bedrooms in SF run from 3000 to 5500. Which is nuts. I don’t get how people afford it”

They afford it by having 4 or 5 roommates. I guess that’s OK if you’re 22 and “finding yourself” in SF, but once puberty is completed it gets unbearable.


18 posted on 06/07/2013 7:35:48 AM PDT by Wordkraft (Remember who the Collaborators are.)
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To: Resolute Conservative

Plus in Texas you can shoot hookers when they don’t put out...


19 posted on 06/07/2013 7:36:49 AM PDT by stormer
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To: Boogieman

You must not have read the article (I KNOW!! THIS HAPPENS ON FR? LOL)

It’s a lower small apartment in the home they live in.


20 posted on 06/07/2013 7:57:04 AM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to thoe tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: reaganaut1

“The citywide median rental price for a one-bedroom is $2,764 a month,”

That’s about 5 years of property tax for my house, which has more than 5 bedrooms and cost only 5x more to purchase.

The crime rate here is pretty low too.


21 posted on 06/07/2013 8:23:59 AM PDT by HomeAtLast
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To: stormer

Ya might want to zot that comment. It is just bizzare.


22 posted on 06/07/2013 8:24:03 AM PDT by piytar (The predator-class is furious that their prey are shooting back.)
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To: reaganaut1

We rented to my wife’s sister and BIL until they were able to afford their own home. Then we converted to a one-family. We never wanted to be landlords and wouldn’t gotten this two family house if it hadn’t been for a couple of things that fell into place.


23 posted on 06/07/2013 8:30:46 AM PDT by Tanniker Smith (Rome didn't fall in a day, either.)
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To: dfwgator

LOL

No joke.


24 posted on 06/07/2013 8:39:03 AM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Boogieman

Actually, in a place like San Francisco you can reasonably leave a home unrented.

Victorian era homes, many times, are comprised 2 or 3 dwellings. That is, there may on front door the building with a residence on the main floor and a stair case leading to the other residence(s).

If I had one of those homes and had this guys experience, I can see myself letting the home below me stay vacant. I would use it for storage and guests, while avoiding tennants who do indeed have more rights than landlords and they know it.

Many renters feel entitled to abuse another person and their properly.

The law gives them imprimature and arrogance to trash someone el property and act in all kinds of manner.

I have a friend who owns several homes and she did just that.

No more BS interruptions to her life and if a friendhhas too much to drink they can spend the night downstairs and she is damned proud to be able to let her friends do just that.

Better they use what she calls her in-law home than to get beat up or robbed on the way home.


25 posted on 06/07/2013 8:58:19 AM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: piytar

http://freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/3028490/posts


26 posted on 06/07/2013 9:03:36 AM PDT by stormer
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To: stormer

My bad. Topical not bizzare.


27 posted on 06/07/2013 10:56:30 AM PDT by piytar (The predator-class is furious that their prey are shooting back.)
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To: Vendome

Well, you’re talking about owner-occupied buildings, which usually only have a couple rental units and are a small share of the market. They don’t have much impact on city-wide vacancy figures.


28 posted on 06/07/2013 11:45:48 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: autumnraine

I did read the article, and in it, he makes the claim that people like him refusing to rent are the cause of the vacancy numbers city-wide, which is just ridiculous.


29 posted on 06/07/2013 11:47:51 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

Probably not.


30 posted on 06/07/2013 11:48:39 AM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Wordkraft

Well, salaries are also proportionally higher in urban markets as well. 3,000 a month looks insane if you live in an area where the average income is 30,000 a year, but not so much when the average income is 80,000 a year.


31 posted on 06/07/2013 11:49:45 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

The average price of a single family home in SF is over 700k. Only 11% of the population can afford to own their own home.

I lived in SF for 25 years and even with rent control I paid $1000/month for a one bedroom apt in a 100 year old bldg. When I left SF in 2002 the rent was adjusted up to $3250/month.

While the physical setting of the city is beautiful the quality of life has deteriorated.


32 posted on 06/07/2013 12:18:46 PM PDT by Wordkraft (Remember who the Collaborators are.)
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To: Wordkraft

I think the rent control actually contributes to inflated rents, since when landlords finally get the chance to increase rents, they will raise them as much as possible. It actually makes it more of a “seller’s market”, instead of the natural rental market, where what tenants are willing to pay constrains how much rents are raised each year.

The rental prices are also naturally linked to home prices. When the credit is easy or home prices are low, rents drop because there is less demand for apartments. If the prices are high, like in SF, or there is limited inventory of homes, or tight credit, then more people rent and you can charge higher rents without risking vacancies.


33 posted on 06/07/2013 3:46:17 PM PDT by Boogieman
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