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The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again
National Bureau of Economic Research ^ | June 2013 | George J. Borjas

Posted on 06/12/2013 10:22:38 AM PDT by reaganaut1

This paper uses data drawn from the 1970-2010 decennial Censuses to examine the evolution of immigrant earnings in the U.S. labor market. The analysis reveals that there are cohort effects not only in the level of earnings, with more recent cohorts generally having relatively lower entry wages, but also in the rate of growth of earnings, with more recent cohorts having a smaller rate of economic assimilation. Immigrants who entered the country before the 1980s typically found that their initial wage disadvantage (relative to natives) narrowed by around 15 percentage points during their first two decades in the United States. In contrast, the immigrants who entered the country after the 1980s have a negligible rate of wage convergence. Part of the slowdown in wage convergence reflects a measurable reduction in the actual rate of human capital accumulation. In particular, there has been a concurrent decline in the rate at which the newer immigrant cohorts are “picking up” English language skills. The study isolates one factor that explains part of these trends: The rate of increase in English language proficiency is significantly slower for larger national origin groups. The growth in the size of these groups accounts for about a quarter of the decline in the rates of human capital acquisition and economic assimilation.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: aliens; borjas; immigration
Dicussed in a blog post Slowing immigrant assimiliation, which I will quote:

"George Borjas’s latest paper released at NBER shows that newer waves of immigrants are less able to assimilate than previous immigrants waves. Newer waves are increasingly worse at human capital accumulation – English language acquisition being the biggest which feeds into their lagging economic assimilation. Borjas finds that immigrant cohorts that entered the country before the 1980s showed a 15 percentage point increase in their fluency rates over twenty years. Cohorts entering after the 1980s showed only a 7 percentage point increase while immigrants who arrived between 1995 and 2000 have showed only a 2 percentage point increase in fluency over the past decade."

1 posted on 06/12/2013 10:22:38 AM PDT by reaganaut1
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To: reaganaut1

They must ave heard the phrase, “separate but equal”. They don’t have to assimilate in order to get the benefits that US taxpayers are robbed for.


2 posted on 06/12/2013 11:21:24 AM PDT by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like it)
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