Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Farmers warn of high milk prices without farm bill
Associated Press ^ | Jun 28, 2013 5:59 PM EDT | M.L. Johnson

Posted on 06/28/2013 5:15:17 PM PDT by Olog-hai

Dairy farmers expressed frustration this week with Congress’ failure to pass a farm bill, saying the uncertainty made it hard to do business and some could go under without changes to the federal milk program.

Farmers also worried that if a current nine-month extension of the 2008 farm bill expires with no action, a 64-year-old law will kick in, sending milk prices spiraling. While that might provide short-term profits, they say, it’d hurt them in the long run because no one wants to buy milk at $6 a gallon. …

(Excerpt) Read more at hosted.ap.org ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; News/Current Events; US: District of Columbia
KEYWORDS: agribusiness; communistmanifesto; farmbill; milk

1 posted on 06/28/2013 5:15:17 PM PDT by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Oh, how sad. The country will never survive uncontrolled supply and demand for milk.


2 posted on 06/28/2013 5:17:58 PM PDT by Tax-chick (I want shrimp tacos.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Geez, how about repealing the stupid 1949 law?? That’s never an option of course, because then we wouldn’t need a manipulation of milk prices, and the graft that goes with them.


3 posted on 06/28/2013 5:18:15 PM PDT by cotton1706
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

What a bunch of crap. Milk price “supports” need to end now.


4 posted on 06/28/2013 5:18:20 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

I don’t drink milk even though I grew up on a dairy farm. Too much stuff in the strainer.


5 posted on 06/28/2013 5:20:09 PM PDT by Utah Binger (Southern Utah where the world comes to see America)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Works for me. Lots of other prices will come down. Sugar for one.


6 posted on 06/28/2013 5:20:30 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Who could have known that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional news?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Then separate the farm bill from the food stamps bill and we can talk.......without that, forget about it


7 posted on 06/28/2013 5:21:59 PM PDT by blueyon (The U. S. Constitution - read it and weep)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Well Mr. Farmer, I must warn you that with all the subsidies in the MANY bills, this country is going to go broke.

Perhaps we should pay a bit more for the milk that we consume, instead of letting you have the money to use as you see fit.


8 posted on 06/28/2013 5:23:31 PM PDT by Irenic (The pencil sharpener and Elmer's glue is put away-- we've lost the red wheel barrow)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Another product I can live without and take off my grocery list.


9 posted on 06/28/2013 5:23:45 PM PDT by Wiggins
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blueyon

Exactly. This is nothing more than a blatant attempt to play the low-information voter.


10 posted on 06/28/2013 5:24:47 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Toddsterpatriot; Mase; expat_panama; 1010RD

Love to here some of our protectionists explain this one away. High-paying jobs? National security? China?


11 posted on 06/28/2013 5:25:32 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

I propose an experiment: Let’s not do the price supports, and let’s see what happens to the price. I don’t think we’ve seen this tried for quite a while.


12 posted on 06/28/2013 5:27:12 PM PDT by Cyber Liberty (I am a dissident. Will you join me? My name is John....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Where I live milk prices are kept artificially high by the federal governments rules.


13 posted on 06/28/2013 5:27:31 PM PDT by Iron Munro (Rubio's New Book: From Nobody To Senator, To Conservative savior, Then Back To Nobody")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Utah Binger

I was raised on a dairy farm as well, drank a lot of milk back in the day ... still do, guess it couldn’t be too bad, made it to age 67 ... guess the strainers work. LOL!


14 posted on 06/28/2013 5:27:31 PM PDT by doc1019 (There is absolutely no difference between pro-choice and pro-abortion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Hahahahaha! No morons, for the millionth time, centralized planning is not more efficient than the “invisible hand”. Price supports are never a good deal for an economy as a whole.


15 posted on 06/28/2013 5:28:03 PM PDT by RightInEastLansing
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

How about we allow the small farmer to compete with the Goliath and allow raw milk sales? That will help lower the price!

Oh, that’s not the kind of price lowering you were talking about is it Mr Milk Mogul.


16 posted on 06/28/2013 5:30:59 PM PDT by American in Israel (A wise man's heart directs him to the right, but the foolish mans heart directs him toward the left.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

I’m gonna buy a goat.


17 posted on 06/28/2013 5:31:33 PM PDT by RoosterRedux (You can't eat Sharia)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RightInEastLansing

When I was a kid in the 1960’s, milk was about one dollar a gallon and my Dad made $8,000 a year. Now he would be making over 80,000 a year and I paid $2.69 for a gallon in Costco the other day. Really.


18 posted on 06/28/2013 5:32:38 PM PDT by cumbo78
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Tax-chick

I’d rather pay the honest price for milk at the store than the dishonest price through taxes and farmer welfare.


19 posted on 06/28/2013 5:34:05 PM PDT by Poison Pill (Take your silver lining and SHOVE IT!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

The farmers took “Dane geld” and now are owned by the feral gov’t.


20 posted on 06/28/2013 5:34:40 PM PDT by dynachrome (Vertrou in God en die Mauser)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tax-chick
The problem is that they have an old law on the books that, rather then repealing it like any thinking person would, they have just been overriding.

Which is why all laws should be written with a sunset date included but that is another rant.

I wish the government would just keep their fingers out.

21 posted on 06/28/2013 5:38:22 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Revenge is a dish best served with pinto beans and muffins)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Well, like that old saying goes: “Might as well buy the cow, if milk is going to cost $6 a gallon”.


22 posted on 06/28/2013 5:40:37 PM PDT by Gator113 ( ~just keep livin~ I drink good wine, listen to good music and dream good dreams.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Wiggins

OMG! How will the children eat all of that crappy sugar infused pulp that is called breakfast cereal? See at least two more groups will be pushing for this.


23 posted on 06/28/2013 5:40:43 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

I would be willing to bet that even WITH a farm bill
we’ll see higher milk and food prices...


24 posted on 06/28/2013 5:41:37 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Farmers warn of high milk prices without farm bill


Good.

My friends sell raw milk for $5 a gallon, including all the milk fat.


25 posted on 06/28/2013 5:43:30 PM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: doc1019
"I was raised on a dairy farm as well, drank a lot of milk back in the day ... still do, guess it couldn’t be too bad, made it to age 67 ... guess the strainers work. LOL!"

Raised on a dairy farm too in my youth. At 69.5 years of age, I still drink two big glasses of milk daily.

26 posted on 06/28/2013 5:46:28 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

cheaper to pay the higher price at the store than through taxation.


27 posted on 06/28/2013 5:48:38 PM PDT by cableguymn (The founding fathers would be shooting by now..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Buy a goat if you can’t afford factory milk. Actually, adults don’t need milk and children only need a glass a day, so at $6/gal., there could be a drastic decrease in this commodity with negligible effects.


28 posted on 06/28/2013 5:50:38 PM PDT by txrefugee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Makes me even more glad we switched to unsweetened almond milk.


29 posted on 06/28/2013 5:52:40 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

And millions of welfarestitutes warn of higher taxes with Farm bill.


30 posted on 06/28/2013 5:58:33 PM PDT by IllumiNaughtyByNature ($1.84 - The price of a gallon of gas on Jan. 20th, 2009.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cumbo78

8 years ago milk was about $3 and I made 50,000 this year it is about $3 and I made 170,000. Do you judge whether or not prices are based on your income?


31 posted on 06/28/2013 6:05:49 PM PDT by FreedomNotSafety
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: 1rudeboy

If, say Iceland, was exporting milk you would from many on this site that we need to do something. If, OMG, China was exporting milk almost everyone here would be in support of all the government intervention they could get.

I want to know if Dairies are allowed to export milk. It is after all “our” milk produced on our land is it not? Milk should not be allowed to be exported, it should stay here and help feed our people and help create our jobs. /s


32 posted on 06/28/2013 6:13:18 PM PDT by FreedomNotSafety
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Too bad. Everyone has to ‘give’ their fair share. 0bama says so.


33 posted on 06/28/2013 6:14:10 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (0bama's agenda¬óDivide and conquer seems to be working.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Milk prices are high now. So are meat, produce and lots of food items. Don’t dairy farmers ever visit the grocery store?


34 posted on 06/28/2013 6:21:50 PM PDT by stevem
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: American in Israel
How about we allow the small farmer to compete with the Goliath and allow raw milk sales? That will help lower the price!

You have it backwards. Goliath would very quickly put all the small farmers out of business. The milk and sugar programs are probably the worst sections of the farm bill and should be radically reformed, but ....

The truth is, the big farmers and agribusinesses don't need the commodity programs. They use them, of course; if the feds have a thumb in the scale, anyone competing in an affected market has to play ball to remain competitive. But that said, the big guys could easily go full free market. The programs are there to keep the small farmers in business.

Then things get tricky. Critics who understand the above will sometimes argue that we should means test the programs. That's a plan, Sherlock: let's have a farm program that systematically discriminates against our most innovative, productive, and competitive producers. Strikes me as stupid, but others' mileage may vary.

Then the international dimension kicks in. As bad as U.S. farm policy is, the fact is, on the international scene, we are one of the good guys. Our hands are not clean, but we are a lot better than most of the furriners, and our farmers are competing in global markets. The best way to unwind the farm policy mess would be in the context of multilateral trade negotiations, but that is notoriously difficult.

So here we are. I am not a defender of the current mess, but I do think it's useful to recognize that reform is not as simple as some think. It's also useful to recognize that our farm programs have produced a U.S. food system that is remarkably cheap and wonderfully abundant. American consumers are currently spending less than 6% of disposable income on food at the grocery store, the lowest ratio in the world and the lowest in U.S. history, at least since USDA has tracked the number. Including food eaten away from home, we spend less than 10% of disposable income, again the lowest in the world. This is popularly regarded as a policy failure. Go figure.

35 posted on 06/28/2013 6:39:15 PM PDT by sphinx
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: sphinx

Yet we force corn and milk into huge co-ops that “reprocess” the products. And send swat teams to stop someone from selling raw milk.

What the heck is up with that?! There has to be a real reason.


36 posted on 06/28/2013 7:00:13 PM PDT by American in Israel (A wise man's heart directs him to the right, but the foolish mans heart directs him toward the left.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: cumbo78

Have you driven through farm country lately?

While farmers are living much, much better than they did just 10 or 15 years ago, their income doesn’t even begin to measure up to a comparable ‘in-the-city’ businessman’s.

That can be assessed from behind the windshield. examining farm income would confirm your initial assessment.


37 posted on 06/28/2013 7:03:23 PM PDT by Balding_Eagle (When America falls, darkness will cover the face of the earth for a thousand years.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai; All
Before Constitution-ignoring socialist FDR had nuked the Supreme Court with activist majority justices, Constitution-respecting justices had clarified, in terms of the 10th Amendment nonetheless, that the states have never delegated to Congress via the Constitution the specific power to regulate intrastate agriculture.
"From the accepted doctrine that the United States is a government of delegated powers, it follows that those not expressly granted, or reasonably to be implied from such as are conferred, are reserved to the states, or to the people. To forestall any suggestion to the contrary, the Tenth Amendment was adopted. The same proposition, otherwise stated, is that powers not granted are prohibited. None to regulate agricultural production is given, and therefore legislation by Congress for that purpose is forbidden (emphasis added)."--Mr. Justice Roberts(?), United States v. Butler, 1936.

Noting that one of the few aspects of intrastate commerce that Congress does have the constitutional Article I, Section 8-limited power to address is postal services (Clause 7 of Section 8 of Article I) the only reason that corrupt Congress is now regulating intrastate commerce, including agricultural production, is because of the Supreme Court unreasonably wide, 10th Amendment-ignoring interpretation of the Commerce Clause in Wickard v. Filburn.

In fact, contrast the Court's clarification that intrastate agricultural production is protected by 10A in Butler with how outcome-driven activist justices used terms like "some concept" and "implicit" to water down 10A in Wickard.

"In discussion and decision, the point of reference, instead of being what was "necessary and proper" to the exercise by Congress of its granted power, was often some concept of sovereignty thought to be implicit in the status of statehood (emphasis added). Certain activities such as "production," "manufacturing," and "mining" were occasionally said to be within the province of state governments and beyond the power of Congress under the Commerce Clause."--Wickard v. Filburn, 1942.

The bottom line is that the states have never delegated to Congress via the Constitution the specific power to regulate intrastate agriculture imo, or most other aspects of intrastate commerce.

38 posted on 06/28/2013 7:37:22 PM PDT by Amendment10
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Olog-hai

Weird. I pay $5.50 per half gallon of unpasteurized milk from a local dairy.

End all government price supports. Let’s try out a free market and see what happens.


39 posted on 09/11/2013 7:16:55 PM PDT by andyk (I have sworn...eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: andyk

The farm bill that affects milk prices was passed in July.

And God forbid anyone should actually pay a fair market price for their milk without government help! /s


40 posted on 09/11/2013 7:23:25 PM PDT by hlmencken3 (Originalist on the the 'general welfare' clause? No? NOT an originalist!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson