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Lies About Trade Agreements
GOP USA ^ | 7/24/2013 | Phyliss Schlafly

Posted on 07/25/2013 3:24:46 AM PDT by IbJensen

When will Republicans wake up to the way U.S. jobs are betrayed by Barack Obama and the corporate interests that hide under the moniker "free trade"? It's an embarrassment that Republican powers-that-be have joined with the Obama Democrats to push the new Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement.

We should have recognized free trade as bad news when Obama hammered on it in his State of the Union message. He probably looks upon it as another strategy to redistribute the wealth of our country, which is a major goal of his administration.

In 2012 when Congress was passing the Korea-U.S. Trade Agreement (KORUS), Obama predicted that it would create 70,000 U.S. jobs for Americans who would then pay taxes and not need food stamps. He even predicted, "soon, there will be new cars on the streets of Seoul imported from Detroit."

The bad effect was immediate. In the first year after KORUS took effect, the U.S. trade deficit with South Korea increased by $5.8 billion, costing 40,000 jobs, mostly in manufacturing, according to the Economic Policy Institute.

KORUS was really good in creating jobs in Korea but caused a big loss of American jobs. While the U.S. trade deficit with the world increased 21 percent, our trade deficit with Korea jumped 81 percent.

We're still waiting to see Detroit-made cars on the streets of Seoul. With that experience, it makes no sense for our trade negotiators to expand and imitate the KORUS model.

Remember NAFTA? The year before NAFTA, the U.S. ran a $1.6 billion trade surplus with Mexico. Last year, the U.S. ran a $64 billion deficit.

NAFTA was predicted to create 20,000 new U.S. jobs by increasing our exports to Mexico. That turned out to be another pipe dream; by 2010, NAFTA had eliminated 682,900 U.S. jobs, some in every state.

Business news sources have recently been predicting that U.S. manufacturing is on the verge of a large, permanent comeback because labor costs in China are rising and U.S. energy costs are dropping. Some writers became so excited that they dubbed the change "the insourcing boom."

Dream on. It isn't happening. Even after labor costs increase in China, there is no way they will rise enough to send U.S. plants back to the U.S. (Many will move to Vietnam.)

Trade agreements are supposed to be about increasing job-creating exports. They are not. They are about creating imports from low-wage countries that often cheat us coming and going.

Even our friend South Korea is into the cheating racket. In order to sell us some products even cheaper than those produced by their own low wages, South Korea arranged for some products to be manufactured over the border in North Korea, which means we are helping to finance North Korea to build its nuclear weapons to threaten us.

These trade agreements are supposed to be about promoting U.S. exports. Since we started going along with these free-trade agreements, imports have increased much faster than exports, creating jobs in other countries.

The U.S. has consistently run trade deficits with South Korea ($13 billion last year), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The deficit soared after the agreement took effect. Since 2000, the United States has lost almost a third (5.5 million) of its manufacturing jobs, according to the Congressional Research Service.

The evidence is so overwhelming that one wonders about the honesty of those who advocate more such trade deals. Do they really want American workers to be in competition with low-wage countries that don't respect any of our hard-fought employment rights and benefits, and work in conditions where the building can collapse at any time (as happened a few months ago, killing more than a thousand employees)?

The trade agreements are a violation of U.S. sovereignty and our Constitution. The sponsors of these trade agreements realize they are unwelcome to the American people.

Since they are treaties with foreign governments, they should be handled only in a procedure that requires a two-thirds vote in the Senate. Instead, their handlers are putting them through both Houses of Congress by a simple majority vote.

Fifty-thousand Americans gave their lives in the 1950s to keep South Korea free, and we've maintained an expensive border patrol ever since to protect the South Koreans against Communist North Korea, so South Korea doesn't have to pay for its own defense. We shouldn't give South Korea American jobs, too.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: evilobamaregime; liars; trade
Republicans are chowing down on the central socialist government's Gravy Train, along with their cousins, the Democrats. They are NOT going to stop because it's just too good and they're fat & happy so why mess up the “Free” Trade Racket.

Many, many years ago Congress did things, took actions, that benefited The Republic thereby benefitting their constituents . Those days are long gone and our nation is dying and will be dead like the city of Detroit.

Ross Perot was right about one thing and that was the sucking sound of American Jobs and industries disappearing due to NAFTA. And it just gets worse. Just when America needs a true Conservative leader, the Republicrat Party dishes up Mitt Romney. In only one speech at the end of his campaign he dared to mention a desire of the rebirth of Major American Industry. Too late Mitts, you would have, at that, been a far better choice than retaining the American-hating African. But it gets worse. We are then forced to offer up our children to fight in wars and have those children that survive, to come back and get in line for a tough interview for a job at Walmart… Yet, those who can pull the strings, the Power Players scream about the need for “competition”, waving Adam Smith’s book, The Wealth of Nations, around like Mao’s Little Red Book.

No it gets much much worse. “Our” Government has turned into a Police State Banana Republic without the bananas, and has at its head a phony, un-vetted mystery man who is allowed stay in office, and rule as if he were a King.

1 posted on 07/25/2013 3:24:46 AM PDT by IbJensen
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To: IbJensen

Bump for later. Lots of interesting items about a very complex issue, and I’m afraid the author oversimplifies too many things here.


2 posted on 07/25/2013 4:04:59 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: Alberta's Child

Give it your best shot, the “free” trade gambit has been co-opted by the Fascii aka Crony Capitalist. Time to go full on protectionism!


3 posted on 07/25/2013 4:35:32 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: iopscusa

Protectionism kills


4 posted on 07/25/2013 4:37:00 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Travon... Felony assault and battery hate crime)
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To: bert

Yeah, China, Korea’s, Japan’s, Mexico’s, Europe’s Protectionism killed US manufacturing. These Fair Trade Treaties are nothing but unfair trade for the US.
Try again!


5 posted on 07/25/2013 4:40:01 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: iopscusa

Blah blah blah yada yada yada brigadier balderdash


6 posted on 07/25/2013 4:43:32 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Travon... Felony assault and battery hate crime)
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To: bert
Protectionism kills

Yeah, Red China's protectionist trade policies sure killed their economy!


7 posted on 07/25/2013 4:54:39 AM PDT by Count of Monte Fisto
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To: iopscusa

It never was about free trade.


8 posted on 07/25/2013 4:57:47 AM PDT by freedomfiter2 (Brutal acts of commission and yawning acts of omission both strengthen the hand of the devil.)
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To: Count of Monte Fisto

Then there's this..... what trade can and does do

9 posted on 07/25/2013 5:00:20 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Travon... Felony assault and battery hate crime)
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To: iopscusa; conservatism_IS_compassion; TexGrill
...Japan’s...   ...Protectionism killed US manufacturing....

Wait a second.  Japan's trade deficit is soaring--

 

 

 

[click to enlarge]

 

 

 

 

--along with their GDP:

 

I mean, a trade deficit is what foreign investment is and Japan's running with it (related thread).

10 posted on 07/25/2013 5:20:03 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: 1rudeboy; Toddsterpatriot; Mase; SAJ; 1010RD

fyi


11 posted on 07/25/2013 5:22:09 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: expat_panama
As Mr. Lincoln once famously noted, "Calling a tail a leg does not make the tail a leg.".

The same sentiment applies with even more force to the concept of "free trade". As practised today (in the US and virtually everywhere else), "free trade" means, mas o menos, "first hog to the trough, and hogs already there stay put".

"Free trade" (sic) is these days little or nothing other than goobermint-sanctioned rent seeking on the part of established interests.

Hey, Pete -- Panama has a shiny new "free trade" agreement with the US, right? Seen any increase in newly imported products, or any decrease in prices of existing imports? Right, you haven't, with the minimal exception of int'l giants such as Nabisco expanding product lines somewhat.

But you have seen attempts by goobermint to confiscate the land of the peones to build more warehouse space in that wonderful "free trade" zone of Colon (remember the short-lived and widely protested Ley 73?)

Bah! What rubbish.

12 posted on 07/25/2013 6:34:41 AM PDT by SAJ
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To: SAJ

Not following you here. Are you saying you want to pay higher Panamanian taxes on American goods, and you want Americans paying higher US taxes on Panamanian coffee/chocolate/bananas?


13 posted on 07/25/2013 7:00:01 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: expat_panama
Pete, if that were ALL there was to it, of course not.

However, that is NOT all there is to it, and you know this perfectly well. Actual free trade agreements would have the very nearly immediate effect of increasing the number and variety of available goods. This agreement has had no such effect, to my observation (based principally on retail shops in Playa Coronado and Ciudad Panama).

The only product -- only the one -- where I have seen new product entries is, oddly enough, pie shells. (?!?) Keebler are now marketing their product(s) to a limited extent.

Electronics? No. Household goods, kitchen items? Not a chance. Dairy products? You're kidding, right -- checked the prices of import cheeses recently? At least we've Toledano Farms right near El Valle, where eggs are very reasonable (and excellent quality, btw). I'll have to check out their cheeses next visit.

Priced dill pickles recently? They're ridiculously high, the more so because cukes are so cheap here. So, I've taken to growing my own dill -- let's face it, making pickles is simply NOT difficult, eh. Have you noted that you can find all the Spanish brands of olives you want...but hardly any Italian or US olives? Have you noticed that paper products -- easily 30% or more above comparable products in other nations -- have stayed exactly where they were. Where are Scott's or Tiger's brands, eh?

"Free trade", my backside.

14 posted on 07/25/2013 7:27:05 AM PDT by SAJ
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To: IbJensen
"Ross Perot was right about one thing and that was the sucking sound of American Jobs and industries disappearing due to NAFTA"

OK one last time...

The absolute BEST number the unionistas can come up with to support their claim that NAFTA had a net loss of Jobs for the USA is 700,000. And that is a TOTAL Number since NAFTA was put into enforcement.

So NAFTA webt into effect on January 1st 1994, Now using basic math. 700,000 divided by 19 years = 36,842 jobs a year. But I'll be generous and say the Unionistas underestimated the number and we will call it 50K a year. In 2008 Jobs lost in the USA was 2.6 MILLION and that was ONE YEAR.

So do the rest of us FReepers a favor and try not to embarrass us by touting a bunch of BULLSHIT.

OH and for the record the Unionistas run the NAFTA Jobs lost numbers without figuring in jobs gained from goods imported into the USA (Shipping, Customs, Dock Workers and Retail and Warehousing jobs etc.) So figure the unionistas are high by a good 10% - 15% in their Jobs lost claim.

15 posted on 07/25/2013 7:47:15 AM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: Mad Dawgg
So do the rest of us FReepers a favor and try not to embarrass us by touting a bunch of BULLSHIT.

Try to contain yourself. You're sounding like a mad dog. Oh. That's very appropriately your handle here. At any rate you resemble an obtuse Neanderthal with personal attacks such as this. What's your opinion, if indeed you have one, regarding the WTO?

16 posted on 07/25/2013 8:03:35 AM PDT by IbJensen (Liberals are like Slinkies, good for nothing, but you smile as you push them down the stairs.)
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To: IbJensen
"At any rate you resemble an obtuse Neanderthal with personal attacks such as this."

Showing that blaming NAFTA for a current jobless woes is a steaming pile, may be in your book a "personal attack" but in the real world its just BULLSHIT!

I wish the NAFTA jobless numbers were all we had to complain about jobs wise. I will lay you odds that if we were only talking about 40k more or less jobs lost a year we would all be dancing in the streets. But if you want to go on touting NAFTA as the jobs boogieman be my guest. Just know that anyone with an IQ north of 65 can ascertain your argument is full of Barbara Streisand!

17 posted on 07/25/2013 8:29:53 AM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: bert

“Protectionism kills”

The USA experienced one of the fastest rates of economic and industrial expansion the world has ever seen from the end of the Civil War into the 20th century. Tariffs were very high during the 19th century and early 20th century. In fact, tariffs and duties funded the cost of the federal government until the 16th Amendment to the Constitution was passed in 1913.

The USA has experienced a significant loss of manufacturing infrastructure, loss of middle class jobs, and a declining standard of living for the first time in its history during the two decades of the globalist free trade experiment (NAFTA, CAFTA, WTO, etc.). Plus the deindustrialization of the US has allowed China to emerge quickly as an economic and military rival of the US, threatening our national security.

History shows protectionism worked for the US historically and works for China today. Free trade has been an economic disaster for the middle class and a windfall for the elites in government and on Wall Street.

We’ve tried “free trade” with mercantilist nations for over 2 decades and it has failed to enhance the US economy. Time to go back to high tariffs and more manufacturing jobs.


18 posted on 07/25/2013 8:41:59 AM PDT by Soul of the South (Yesterday is gone. Today will be what we make of it.)
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To: IbJensen
Remember NAFTA? The year before NAFTA, the U.S. ran a $1.6 billion trade surplus with Mexico. Last year, the U.S. ran a $64 billion deficit.

Trade only creates jobs when we run a surplus? Really?

In 1994, we sold about $51 billion worth of goods to Mexico. In 2012, we sold almost $216 billion to Mexico.

NAFTA was predicted to create 20,000 new U.S. jobs by increasing our exports to Mexico. That turned out to be another pipe dream; by 2010, NAFTA had eliminated 682,900 U.S. jobs, some in every state.

Let's see your math, don't just shove a union "calculated" number down our throat.

Ross Perot was right about one thing and that was the sucking sound of American Jobs and industries disappearing due to NAFTA.

Sorry, Ross was wrong, wrong, wrong.

19 posted on 07/25/2013 8:44:01 AM PDT by Toddsterpatriot (Science is hard. Harder if you're stupid.)
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To: Toddsterpatriot

I didn’t vote for him; however, there are some aspects of the trade agreements, both NAFTA and WTO that I don’t like.

That being said, the reason U. S. manufacturers moved to Asia was due to the onerous taxes levied on them by a clueless central socialist government.


20 posted on 07/25/2013 8:54:08 AM PDT by IbJensen (Liberals are like Slinkies, good for nothing, but you smile as you push them down the stairs.)
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To: Mad Dawgg

So where did the 10 Million manufacturing jobs go after they left the USA?


21 posted on 07/25/2013 10:26:36 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: IbJensen

So the slave wages paid by the Commie Chinese had nothing to do with the exodus of Crony Caps to China. Agree about the tax/reg burdens in US but whose GD fault is that? Those 10 million manufacturing jobs exported represent one of the few stepping stones to joining and strengthening the Middle Class, the only group of people capable of defeating the Commie takeover! Look what ‘free’ aka Global Regulated Trade (World Bank, BIS, WTO, G20, etc.) has done. Don’t be trapped in a bogus world view. These are the days of eat or be eaten!


22 posted on 07/25/2013 10:35:41 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: IbJensen; bert

Sorry IbJ, comment #21 & #22 were meant for Bert.


23 posted on 07/25/2013 10:39:07 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: iopscusa

No jobs were exported.

Plants closed because American workers were not competitive on the world market. Had the manufacturing not been moved, the jobs would have been lost because the place went broke.

That happened in England when the textiles industry moved to New England. It happened again when New England was deserted and the textile industry moved to the Carolinas. It is gone from there now for the same reason. Americans just were not competitive.

You speak of jobs as an object. Jobs are labor. Labor is a commodity to be purchased at a competitive rate.

When you begin to think in terms of Chicaps, you will begin the process of enlightenment.

Dwelling in an anomalous past is to live in the dark


24 posted on 07/25/2013 10:47:19 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Travon... Felony assault and battery hate crime)
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To: iopscusa
"So where did the 10 Million manufacturing jobs go after they left the USA?"

First you need to deal with the assumption that they actually left the country.

So if Manufacturing Output for the USA is increasing BUT Manufacturing Jobs are decreasing are these Jobs being sent elsewhere OR are they being eliminated with technology and robotics and increased efficiency?

25 posted on 07/25/2013 10:59:03 AM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: SAJ
Are you saying you want to pay higher Panamanian taxes on American goods, and you want Americans paying higher US taxes on Panamanian coffee/chocolate/bananas?

that is NOT all there is to it,

We agree that we're talking about import taxes (even though it's not all there is to it) and we understand that I want lower taxes and I understand you disagree with me on something but you don't want to answer my question.  So even though I'm still not following your thinking we have come quite a ways here.

26 posted on 07/25/2013 10:59:28 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: bert

Chicaps?


27 posted on 07/25/2013 11:02:57 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: IbJensen
American Jobs and industries disappearing due to NAFTA

America has more jobs and industries since NAFTA began than before.

28 posted on 07/25/2013 11:06:35 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: Mad Dawgg

Yep you are right about the mfg output having risen, assuming that this compares apples to apples. Output could be final product value/price but the many parts of the final product are mfg’d in other countries, (aircraft, automobiles, etc). The manufacturing jobs/employees have been replaced w/ low paying service jobs or w/ welfare...the perfect storm for civil chaos.


29 posted on 07/25/2013 11:11:58 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: iopscusa

Sometimes jobs vanish without moving overseas.

How many buggy-whip manufacturers went belly-up?


30 posted on 07/25/2013 11:13:48 AM PDT by GeronL
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To: iopscusa
...manufacturing jobs/employees have been replaced w/ low paying service jobs or w/ welfare...

Since 1975, average inflation adjusted personal incomes have doubled even while the number of American manufacturing workers has fallen by a third:


31 posted on 07/25/2013 11:26:21 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: iopscusa
"The manufacturing jobs/employees have been replaced w/ low paying service jobs or w/ welfare...the perfect storm for civil chaos."

Actually many of those jobs have been replaced by machines.

A couple of real life examples for you.

In a manufacturing plant located in Indiana they made parts for a FORD car AC unit one of the parts was a valve. Now when they started making this part the line had 12 people on it. After a few years the line was upgraded with a machine.

The machine replaced 10 of the people on the line. You literally could have one guy dump the raw material in one end, and at the other end a guy picked the parts up and put them in a box. Now I am told the guy at the end doing the boxing has been replaced as well. 11 jobs lost to automation on one line of one plant. There were multiple lines just like that one in the very same plant lost to the same automation.

BUT the unions will all cry about outsourcing because they can make Americans think someone else is getting the jobs when in truth they are being eliminated due to tech and efficiency. But its a hard argument to make that we need to toss our wooden sabots into the machines so Union Workers can have cushy jobs.

In a Kenworth plant a few miles northwest of where I live I was employed for a short time "grinding" the rough spots off of fiberglass truck tops. When this plant upgraded to newer process the need to grind these trucktops diminished to nearly zilch. Most of the section I was in was eliminated because they manufacturing process became more efficient.

This is the dirty little secret of US manufacturing. And many times unions will fight the implementation of these newer more efficient manufacturing techniques because their membership diminishes.

Yes there are factories that relocate. Locally there was a strike over a contract that finally sent about 400 jobs to Mexico. These jobs could've stayed here but the Union would not relent and the law in Ohio is that if a union gets its fingers into a company they can never get them out yet there were twice as many people for those 400 jobs that would have gladly worked the contract offered by the plant. So tell me, who sent those particular jobs to Old Mexico? Unions are stuck on stupid the reality of 21st Century America is that manufacturing jobs are shrinking and its easier for a company to either leave OR eliminate jobs by using newer tech.

This trend will continue until sanity is restored in the American Business landscape.

32 posted on 07/25/2013 11:35:28 AM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: iopscusa

Chicaps are Chinese capitalsts. They are ascendnet and the face of change


33 posted on 07/25/2013 12:18:43 PM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Travon... Felony assault and battery hate crime)
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To: expat_panama

Why is it, expat, that everything we buy comes from China or Korea?

Even many production line parts for the ‘Big Three’ come from Asia.

And another thing. Many products that are labeled ‘Mexico’ are shipped from China to Mexico then reshipped to the United States.

You’re not, by any chance, engaged in import are you?


34 posted on 07/25/2013 4:06:15 PM PDT by IbJensen (Liberals are like Slinkies, good for nothing, but you smile as you push them down the stairs.)
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To: iopscusa

As we say down on the friendly border with our neighbor to the south: no problemo.


35 posted on 07/25/2013 4:07:09 PM PDT by IbJensen (Liberals are like Slinkies, good for nothing, but you smile as you push them down the stairs.)
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To: iopscusa

Two things are going to have to be done. There are more, but that will have to come after the revolution.

1. Eliminate the corporate income tax.

2. Take a meat axe to all regulatory agencies of the central socialist government.


36 posted on 07/25/2013 4:08:48 PM PDT by IbJensen (Liberals are like Slinkies, good for nothing, but you smile as you push them down the stairs.)
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To: IbJensen
It's all about corporate taxes and regulation.

Free trade never creates an unlevel field, corporate taxes and excessive regulation do. We have one of the highest corporate tax rates in the industrialized world, and that puts our businesses in a disadvantage from the get-go.

37 posted on 07/25/2013 4:16:44 PM PDT by Partisan Gunslinger
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To: iopscusa
It's not a question of "free trade" vs. "protectionism." The real issue here is that an awful lot of people (including Phylis Schlafly, the author of this piece) never seem to understand that economic objectives are often completely at odds with each other, and it's impossible for a nation to meet all of them simultaneously.

The whole discussion about "free trade" largely revolves around the competing underlying objectives of: (1) maximizing U.S. employment in certain industries, and (2) improving the overall standard of living in the U.S. Where you fall on the issue of "free trade" is really a function of which of these two objectives you're looking to meet.

There are additional issues that come into play, too. Here's a good case in point from the original article:

Remember NAFTA? The year before NAFTA, the U.S. ran a $1.6 billion trade surplus with Mexico. Last year, the U.S. ran a $64 billion deficit.

What the author doesn't point out is that these enormous "trade deficits" with Mexico involve imports that have tremendous value to the U.S. According to U.S. trade statistics, total imports from Mexico into the U.S. were about $278 billion in 2012. The single largest product or raw material in these trade statistics is crude oil ($37B). Since NAFTA was passed in the early 1990s, Mexico and Canada have surpassed Saudi Arabia as the largest foreign suppliers of oil to the U.S. Is Ms. Schlafly -- or anyone here on FreeRepublic -- going to suggest that this is somehow a BAD thing?

The second-largest import from Mexico into the U.S. for 2012 was auto parts and accessories ($32B), which was almost twice the value of new/used cars ($17B). Most of these parts and accessories support the production of automobiles right here in the U.S. How is this a problem, especially if the sourcing of these parts and components from Mexico enables auto plants here in the U.S. to compete effectively with foreign manufacturers?

38 posted on 07/25/2013 5:37:10 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: Soul of the South
The single biggest factor in the loss of manufacturing and "middle class" jobs in the U.S. is not foreign trade -- it's automation. Anyone who thinks the U.S. economy would still be dominated by large-scale manufacturing with thousands of employees working in Rust Belt plants were it not for "free trade" is delusional. Many of those jobs were going to disappear, one way or another.
39 posted on 07/25/2013 5:41:09 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: Alberta's Child

“The single biggest factor in the loss of manufacturing and “middle class” jobs in the U.S. is not foreign trade — it’s automation. “

Textile, apparel, furniture making, and many consumer products assembly jobs did not disappear due to automation. Walk through any Walmart. Most of the consumer products sold in the store are not highly automated in production. If they were, the factories would be in the US and not China.


40 posted on 07/25/2013 7:30:25 PM PDT by Soul of the South (Yesterday is gone. Today will be what we make of it.)
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To: IbJensen
...everything we buy comes from China or Korea...

--or so it feels that way to many people, like a cat always landing on its feet or the toast always falling butter side down.  In real life we can't toss a cat with butter-side-up toast on its back and expect it to fly forever.  When it comes to money we either control out thinking better or we live with our parents. 

 

41 posted on 07/26/2013 3:22:03 AM PDT by expat_panama
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To: Soul of the South
For products that are not highly automated in their production, the shift of production from the U.S. to China has only delayed the inevitable. Asian labor is a cheap alternative to automation ... for now.

Keep in mind that in an age when robotic instruments are being used for something as delicate and precise as surgical procedures, there probably isn't a single manufacturing process that cannot be done through automation.

42 posted on 07/26/2013 4:45:14 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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